Basic Butter Pie Crust

IMG_4560.jpg

Everybody needs a basic butter pie crust. A recipe that’s easy to make, turns out, and goes with all your baking ideas. Oh, and dinner too! Dinner is important.

Like last night. I decided I wanted to make a quiche for dinner, and it was SO nice to be able to pull up this recipe and be able to whip it out, knowing it would turn out, not shrink, and be flaky but sturdy enough to hold a whopping load of eggs, milk, and veggies. Too many veggies, actually. Even though I pre-cooked them, there just wasn’t enough of the custard part of the quiche to hold it all together. Ah well, you live and you learn. And I just had to choose veggies like tomatoes that lose a LOT of liquid when baked. It’s actually a really delicious quiche, I made it crustless a few weeks ago and wanted to share the recipe with you guys, but um. I’ll reduce the quantity of veggies and get back to you with a successful recipe. The crust was nice, regardless.

This crust is your easy buttery friend. If you bake things that need crusts a lot, like quiche, pies, pot pies, homemade poptarts, etc. you’ll have the recipe memorized in no time and can whip it up on command!

I like butter because it tastes the best and is definitely the healthier option when looking at lard and shortening. My mom always uses oil, but oil makes for a finicky and often tough crust. So for a reliable crust, I use butter. For a healthy crust, oil. That recipe will come, but it also won’t be touted as a fool-proof, everyday crust! :)

This butter crust is only flour, salt, butter, and water. If you’ve been burned by crusts in the past (or you’ve burned them, heheh) because they shrink, fall apart, or are tough, despair not, my friend! I think we’ve all been there, maybe on repeat and it can be very frustrating. Along with the recipe I’m also going to share with you all the tips and tricks I’ve learned to get a fool-proof pie crust every time!

Plan Ahead

If you normally eat dinner at 6:30pm and it’s now 6:21pm, I’m sorry but your pie crust will be compromised. Pie crusts need time if they’re going to be the flaky, tasty, shapely vessels for filling that we want them to be!

For this crust you need about 1 1/2 hours minimum, plus more if you need to blind-bake it.

It can be made up to 2-3 days ahead of time and kept in the fridge. It also freezes beautifully. Either way, you can store it as a block of dough or even already prepared in the pie dish.

Tips for a Flaky Crust

When cutting up the cold butter, the chunks don’t have to be super small. 1/2” chunks are great, and try to keep them all the same size so smaller chunks don’t melt while you’re still squishing the bigger chunks.

When crumbling the butter, less is always more. You may be tempted to really integrate the butter, but this is more likely to cause the butter to melt and result in a tough crust. Leave chunks of butter, really, it’ll turn out great!

Make sure your butter is cold and stays cold while you’re making the dough. If your house is warm or even hot like my house in the summertime, then you will probably need to stick your butter back in the fridge or freezer after you cut it into small pieces. If you do this first, you can then weigh your flour, salt, and prepare your ice water while it’s chilling.

If your cold butter softens up too much while crumbling it into the flour mixture, it’s best to stick it back into the fridge/freezer for a few minutes before adding the ice water.

Another note on the ice water, you can also just stick some water in the freezer, but this requires a bit of planning so it’s cold enough when you go to make the crust. I often do this because I have only one ice tray and don’t always have ice ready…especially in the summer. Sometimes an iced beverage takes preference over a crust, haha.

How to Avoid a Shrinking Crust

If your crust is shrinking, most likely it didn’t rest long enough in the fridge. While you are mixing the dough it is inevitable that a bit of gluten builds up, which is a very elastic-like substance. This is good when making bread, bad when making flaky pie crust. The dough needs to rest so that the gluten strands have time to relax. If the gluten strands didn’t have adequate time to relax they will shrink back on themselves, hence the shrinking crust.

If your crust is still shrinking, try to use a ceramic or metal pie dish instead of slippery glass. I LOVE my Emile Henry ceramic pie dish I received for Christmas. French baking ware like Emile Henry and Le Creuset are pricey but so worth it!

You can also try using pie weights if you are blind-baking, or dry beans if you have those on hand. Simply line the inside of your prepared crust with parchment paper and add the pie weights or dry beans. Bake as directed.

Still shrinking? Bake at low temperatures, like 325°F - 350°F / 163°C - 177°C.

Freeze the prepared crust for at least one hour or even overnight.

Make sure your crust reaches high enough that it rests on the lip of the pie dish, not beyond or too short, but just resting on the edge. It also helps to cut off the extra pie crust while leaving an overhang of about 1/2” all the way around. Tuck this overhang under and crimp the edge, or use a fork. The thicker crust edge not only gives you more to work with while crimping, it is also less likely to shrink down.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!


Basic Butter Pie Crust

Makes 1 bottom pie crust. For a bottom and top crust, double this recipe.

Ingredients:

IMG_4558.JPG
  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt

  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into equally-sized 1/2” chunks

  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water

Directions:

Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish.

  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt.  Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands.  You want the butter to end up in pieces, no smaller than peas. 

  2. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible.  The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry or too wet, but still a bit shaggy looking.  Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.  

  3. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly.  Place in fridge for 1 - 48 hours.  

  4. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat.  Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls.  Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.

  5. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang to within about 1/2” of the edge of pie dish if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork.  Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork.  The crust can also be refrigerated or even frozen at this point, if needed.  

  6. If blind baking, bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown.  Cool completely.  Otherwise fill and proceed according to your recipe.


Jenny’s Notes:

  • You can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency.  Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough.  You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be.  The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax.  

  • If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking.  You can also try using pie weights and baking at a lower temperature.

  • I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter.  If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7.  Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.   

easy crust, best crust, all-butter crust, pie crust, crust for quiche, flaky crust, tender crust, butter
dessert, dinner
American
Yield: 8 Servings
Author:

Basic Butter Pie Crust

An everyday all-butter pie crust that is easy, flaky, reliable, and can be made ahead. Great for all your pie crust needs.
prep time: 10 Mcook time: total time: 10 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt
  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into equally-sized 1/2” chunks
  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water

instructions:

How to cook Basic Butter Pie Crust

  1. Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt. Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands. You want the butter to end up in pieces, no smaller than peas.
  3. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible. The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry or too wet, but still a bit shaggy looking. Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.
  4. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly. Place in fridge for 1 - 48 hours.
  5. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat. Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls. Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.
  6. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang to within about 1/2” of the edge of pie dish if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork. The crust can also be refrigerated or even frozen at this point, if needed.
  7. If blind baking, bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown. Cool completely. Otherwise fill and proceed according to your recipe.

NOTES:

You can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency. Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough. You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be. The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax. If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking. You can also try using pie weights and baking at a lower temperature. I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter. If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7. Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.

Calories

122.99

Fat (grams)

5.87

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.63

Carbs (grams)

15.27

Fiber (grams)

0.54

Net carbs

14.73

Sugar (grams)

0.06

Protein (grams)

2.13

Sodium (milligrams)

192.78

Cholesterol (grams)

15.05
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_4555.JPG

The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

2018-12-20 14.16.59.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Fluffy? Isn’t key lime pie supposed to be creamy, custardy, silken? Yes! And this recipe is all of those things but with a special touch of fluffiness, thanks to our friends the egg whites. Whipped egg whites. It’s magical. And with Easter just around the corner, this is the perfect dessert to celebrate with! I even gave you two weeks time to plan ahead, aren't I nice?

I don’t know why I always want to make citrus desserts for Easter, maybe because it’s always in the spring. And in the spring everything is coming alive, the rebirth of nature, and calls for bright, happy citrus flavors. You can’t call citrus sad. And what is Easter but the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus, giving those who believe on Him new life? The celebration of rebirth. It all fits. Not to mention if you observe Lent, getting to eat what you gave up for 6 weeks is lovely.

And whether you have a big Easter meal planned or not, you’re going to want to make this pie. And if you’ve never made key lime pie before? This is not a bad place to start. Just be warned that other key lime pies after this one might be…tame.

Recipe adapted from the Williams-Sonoma cookbook Savoring America


The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Serves 8-12

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Ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust

  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)

  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans

  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger

  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon

  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled

For the Filling

  • 4 eggs, separated

  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here

  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice

  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest

  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

For the Topping and Garnish

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar

  • 1/8 tsp almond extract

  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

Directions:

Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.

Make the Gingersnap Crust

  1. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.

  2. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.

Make the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.

  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.

  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.

  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.

  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Make the Topping

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.

  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things!

  • Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice.

  • If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest.

  • No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

American
Yield: 8-12 servings
Author:

The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Classic key lime pie with a twist. Tart filling made extra light and fluffy by whipping the egg whites, a spicy gingersnap crust, and fresh whipped cream.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 80 M

ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust
  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)
  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans
  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled
For the Filling
  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here
  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
For the Topping and Garnish
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/8 tsp almond extract
  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

instructions:

How to cook The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Make the Gingersnap Crust
  1. Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.
  3. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.
Make the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.
  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.
  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.
  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.
  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.
Make the Topping
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.
  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

NOTES:

The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things! Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice. If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest. No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

Calories

590.80

Fat (grams)

29.69

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.77

Carbs (grams)

76.33

Fiber (grams)

1.88

Net carbs

74.45

Sugar (grams)

55.81

Protein (grams)

8.28

Sodium (milligrams)

256.68

Cholesterol (grams)

90.75
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2018-12-20 14.14.52-2.jpg



Chocolate Thumbprint Cheesecake Cookies

2017-12-19+13.08.33.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

I like cookies.  I like cheesecake.  What happens when you put them together?  These Cheesecake Cookies!  And you know what's great about this recipe?  Besides being delicious, of course, is that it calls for one sleeve of graham crackers.  Perfect for all those times you buy a box of graham crackers to make a crust or similar recipe that usually call for two sleeves of graham crackers and leave you hanging with just one lonely sleeve.  Cheesecake Cookies to the rescue!  They look more time consuming to make than they really are, it's pretty straightforward.  So let's get to it! 

Recipe adapted from Kitchme


Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

Makes about 24 cookies

Ingredients:

2017-12-19 13.12.33.jpg
  • 1 1/4 cups / 135g (1 sleeve) finely crushed chocolate graham crackers

  • 3/4 cup / 90g all-purpose flour

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter, softened

  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar

  • 1 egg, separated

  • 3 ounces / 85g cream cheese, softened

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, optional

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line 2 cookies sheets with parchment or silicone mats.  

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together graham cracker crumbs, flour, and baking powder.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the butter with the brown sugar.  Beat in the egg white.  Add the mixture to the graham cracker mixture and mix until combined.  

  3. Again, in the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat the cream cheese until smooth and creamy.  Add the sugar, egg yolk, zest, and vanilla and beat until smooth.  Set aside.

  4. Using a spoon or small ice cream scoop, scoop a very generous tablespoon worth of dough onto the prepared cookie sheet.  (If your graham cracker dough seems too soft to easily hold its shape, add a bit more flour.)  Repeat until all the dough has been scooped onto the cookies sheets, evenly spaced, leaving room for them to spread.  

  5. Press your thumb into the cookies to make a deep well; fill with the cream cheese mixture. 

  6. Bake 8-11 minutes or until the filling is just set.  

Can't do anything around here.

Can't do anything around here.

Jenny's Notes:

  • Use any flavor graham crackers, regular, cinnamon, chocolate! You could also experiment with similar cookies, such as teddy grahams.

  • Regular sugar can be substituted for the brown sugar with a slightly different texture for the cookie. Not bad, just slightly different. Or add a teaspoon or two of molasses to 1/2 cup regular sugar and mix before adding to the recipe.

  • You can fill the cookies right to the top with the cream cheese as the filling shouldn't do more than puff a bit in the oven.

  • Feel free to add different extracts and zests to your cream cheese filling, if you wish, or even cocoa to make it ALL chocolate! I'm thinking cinnamon graham crackers with a touch of orange extract and orange zest for a fall treat!

American
Yield: 24
Author:

Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

Chocolate graham cracker thumbprint cookies filled with a cream cheese filling.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 11 Mtotal time: 61 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups / 135g (1 sleeve) finely crushed chocolate graham crackers
  • 3/4 cup / 90g all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar
  • 1 egg, separated
  • 3 ounces / 85g cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, optional

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line 2 cookies sheets with parchment or silicone mats.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together graham cracker crumbs, flour, and baking powder.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the butter with the brown sugar. Beat in the egg white. Add the mixture to the graham cracker mixture and mix until combined.
  4. Again, in the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat the cream cheese until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar, egg yolk, zest, and vanilla and beat until smooth. Set aside.
  5. Using a spoon or small ice cream scoop, scoop a very generous tablespoon worth of dough onto the prepared cookie sheet. (If your graham cracker dough seems too soft to easily hold its shape, add a bit more flour.) Repeat until all the dough has been scooped onto the cookies sheets, evenly spaced, leaving room for them to spread.
  6. Press your thumb into the cookies to make a deep well; fill with the cream cheese mixture.
  7. Bake 8-11 minutes or until the filling is just set.

NOTES:

Use any flavor graham crackers, regular, cinnamon, chocolate! You could also experiment with similar cookies, such as teddy grahams. Regular sugar can be substituted for the brown sugar with a slightly different texture for the cookie. Not bad, just slightly different. Or add a teaspoon or two of molasses to 1/2 cup regular sugar and mix before adding to the recipe. You can fill the cookies right to the top with the cream cheese as the filling shouldn't do more than puff a bit in the oven. Feel free to add different extracts and zests to your cream cheese filling, if you wish, or even cocoa to make it ALL chocolate! I'm thinking cinnamon graham crackers with a touch of orange extract and orange zest for a fall treat!

Calories

111.78

Fat (grams)

6.07

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.44

Carbs (grams)

13.46

Fiber (grams)

0.31

Net carbs

13.15

Sugar (grams)

8.41

Protein (grams)

1.29

Sodium (milligrams)

108.74

Cholesterol (grams)

21.56
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2017-12-19+13.04.04.jpg

Caramel Cream Pie

2017-12-23+15.32.59.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Fellow citizens of the webs, I've missed you!  It's been a dreadfully long time since I've posted a new recipe.  Not that I haven't been baking, oh no, but going home for Christmas, festivities, and general merry-making have kept me quite occupied.  It has been difficult to find the time to carve out a window of several hours not only to bake something blog-worthy, but photograph said something, upload photos, edit photos, write the nonsense that is what you are currently reading, type up the recipe, add finished photos, proof read, and post the now finished blog form.  It's quite the process for something that is merely a hobby (yes, I don't in any way, shape, or form get paid for this, enjoy your ad-free recipes!!!) and even though I enjoy the blogging process, sometimes I don't feel that good at any of it.  Except the baking, that's the one thing I feel somewhat competent in.  And even then, there are definitely off days, off recipes, or off concentration.  And I think to myself, does the world need one more baking blog?  One that's, well, not fantastic?  (At least not yet, mwahaha.)  There are so many great ones out there.  But I think the blogs that inspire me the most, the ones that come across as fantastic, are the ones that are passionate about what they do.  Yes, they have picture-perfect photography, reliable recipes, and witty writing, (hey, look at all those alliterations!), but I don't think they all started that way.  How did they arrive there?  Passion, dedication, perseverance, and always looking for ways to improve, I think. 

The world has enough perceived perfection, what we need are those hungry to learn, with a little talent and a lot of humility, and who are then willing to share what they've learned.  I can only hope, in this tidbit of a clumsy blog, that you'd join me in this voyage of discovering and learning, average photography, and lots of good food.  Oh, and feedback and questions are always welcome, that’s what the comments are for below!

Here's to a bright and shiny new year! 

Now, back to that good food we were talking about...

Recipe adapted from Shugary Sweets


Caramel Cream Pie

2017-12-23+15.34.15.jpg

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Crust

  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt

  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into small pieces

  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water

For the Caramel Cream filling and topping

  • 1 14oz can / 380g dulche de leche, your favorite caramel, or 1/2 recipe of this Caramel Sauce

  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 2 1/2 cups / 605g heavy whipping cream

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

Directions:

Make the Crust

Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish. 

IMG_4555.JPG
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt.  Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands.  You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas. 

  2. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible.  The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet.  Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.  

  3. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly.  Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.  

  4. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat.  Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls.  Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.  

  5. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork.  Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork.  The crust can also be refrigerated at this point, if needed.  

  6. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown.  Cool completely.  

Make the Caramel Cream filling and topping

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese with 1/2 cup / 120g caramel.  Set aside.

  2. In the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat whipping cream and sugar until stiff peaks form.  Reserve 1/2 cup for the topping.  Fold the remaining whipped cream into cream cheese mixture, about a quarter at a time.  

  3. Reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the remaining caramel for the topping.  Spread the rest into the bottom of the crust.  Spread cream cheese mixture over caramel.  

  4. Top pie with reserved 1/2 cup whipped cream and caramel, using a spoon or piping desired.

Jenny's Notes:

  • For the crust, you can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency.  Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough.  You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be.  The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax.  

  • If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking.  

  • I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter.  If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7.  Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.   

American
Yield: 8-12 servings
Author:

Caramel Cream Pie

Flaky, buttery crust, whipped caramel filling, and fresh whipped cream with caramel drizzled on top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 1 H & 12 M

ingredients:

For the Crust
  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt
  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into small pieces
  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water
For the Caramel Cream filling and topping
  • 1 14oz can / 380g dulche de leche, your favorite caramel, or 1/2 recipe of this Caramel Sauce
  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 1/2 cups / 605g heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

instructions:

How to cook Caramel Cream Pie

Make the Crust
  1. Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt. Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands. You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas.
  3. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible. The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet. Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.
  4. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly. Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.
  5. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat. Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls. Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.
  6. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork. The crust can also be refrigerated at this point, if needed.
  7. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown. Cool completely.
Make the Caramel Cream filling and topping
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese with 1/2 cup / 120g caramel. Set aside.
  2. In the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat whipping cream and sugar until stiff peaks form. Reserve 1/2 cup for the topping. Fold the remaining whipped cream into cream cheese mixture, about a quarter at a time.
  3. Reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the remaining caramel for the topping. Spread the rest into the bottom of the crust. Spread cream cheese mixture over caramel.
  4. Top pie with reserved 1/2 cup whipped cream and caramel, using a spoon or piping desired.

NOTES:

For the crust, you can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency. Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough. You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be. The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax. If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking. I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter. If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7. Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.

Calories

652.74

Fat (grams)

42.84

Sat. Fat (grams)

26.73

Carbs (grams)

56.39

Fiber (grams)

0.54

Net carbs

55.85

Sugar (grams)

40.81

Protein (grams)

6.75

Sodium (milligrams)

437.41

Cholesterol (grams)

128.91
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
And yet, for as many times as I've made this pie, I've yet to get a photo of it sliced. Oh well, there's butter, caramel, and whipped cream, what more do you need to know?

And yet, for as many times as I've made this pie, I've yet to get a photo of it sliced. Oh well, there's butter, caramel, and whipped cream, what more do you need to know?


Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

But why are they so golden? Many thanks to butter and egg wash.

But why are they so golden? Many thanks to butter and egg wash.

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

I've been thinking about you a lot recently.  How sweet you are, how tender you are, how you like to butter me up. Yeah, you're a little soft, but I love that about you.  I wake up in the morning hoping you'll want to meet me for coffee.  Will you, brioche?  Please say yes.  Before life hardens you and you become like a rock.  But if not, how about your friend?  He looks yummy, too - Oh hey. Welcome to my blog!  Yep, I'm writing a recipe about brioche, mmm hmmm.  No, I was not talking to the brioche. Just eating. Nom nom nom.  See?  Delicious.  Yep.  Believe me and make these, and you'll be talking to your brioche, too.  

Brioche is a yeasted, enriched bread or bun.  By enriched I mean, rich in butter, with help from sugar and eggs.  The amount of butter in the recipe for brioche must be equal to or more than 20% of the flour weight, but can go up to 100%.  I like to think of brioche in three categories, as called by Peter Reinhart: 

  1. Poor man's brioche - consisting of at least 20% butter

  2. Middle-class brioche - consisting of around 50% butter

  3. Rich man's brioche - consisting of 50-80% butter, or on rare occasion, more!

To find the butter percentage, divide the weight of the butter by the weight of the flour and multiply by 100.  

Butter weight / flour weight x 100 = Butter percentage

For example, let's take the recipe below, which calls for 6 Tbsp butter or 85g by weight, divided by 2 1/2 cups flour or 300g by weight, which equals 0.28.  Multiply 0.28 by 100 and you get 28.  Thus the butter percentage is 28 percent in this recipe.  Poor man's brioche!  

85 / 300 x 100 = 28

If the words ratio, weight, percentage make you glaze over, stay with me.  It can be confusing at first, but understanding these concepts can really enhance your baking experience.  Think of it as the key that unlocks all recipes and links them together.  Instead of blindly following a recipe, always secretly wondering what will happen if you omit an egg, use baking soda instead of baking powder, add less flour or sugar than called for, formulas such as this can help you compare recipes across the board. start to notice similarities, how textures are affected by the ratio of liquids to flour, fat to flour, etc.  Ok, so baking soda vs. baking powder is more in the realm of science, but also helpful!  Science and math, who knew?  I know, it's a lot of work, with a scrunched up nose, calculator, and pencil eraser shavings everywhere as you figure out formulas, but it's worth it!  Of course, I'm not here to force you to do anything, so feel free to skip on down to the recipe and ignore all this fancy talk.  No shame or guilt.  

Trust me, I'm still new to this too, and figuring it out myself.  I feel like I've just discovered the tip of the iceberg, and I know, it's slippery along the way as you're calculating numbers, but at the end, you'll have a giant...iceberg...of...information?  Yeah, that.  My boat hit the er, iceberg, when I was gifted Peter Reinhart's bread book.  I had recently started my own levain, really wanting to learn how to make artisan breads.  I didn't really know what I was getting into when I mixed some flour and water together to make a levain.  Now I see there is so much to learn, and I hope to share some of the adventure with you.  I don't plan to become a master bread baker before I start to blog some recipes, so you can share in the discoveries with me.    

Are we done yet? No, on to the poor man's brioche!

Recipe adapted from Soup Addict


Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

Makes 12 rolls

Ingredients:

IMG_4887.jpg
  • 2 1/2 cups / 300g all-purpose flour

  • 2 tsp / 6g instant yeast

  • 1/3 / 67g cup sugar

  • 1 1/2 tsp / 11g salt

  • 1/2 cup / 118g milk

  • 1/2 cup / 118g buttermilk or sour milk

  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter, room temperature

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 1/3 cup / 234g chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat.

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix together flour, yeast, sugar, and salt.  

  2. In a small saucepan heat milk and buttermilk until about 105°F / 40°C.  Add to flour mixture and mix until well combined.  

  3. With the mixer running, add butter and allow to mix until fully immersed.  Add 1 egg.  

  4. Switch to the dough hook and knead on medium speed for 6-8 minutes, until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl and starts to make a slapping sound against the bowl.  If the dough is still clinging to the sides, add a touch more flour until it no longer sticks.  

  5. Mix in chocolate chips just long enough to incorporate.  

  6. Transfer dough to a large oiled bowl.  Flip the dough so that both sides are now oiled.  Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to ferment in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours, or until doubled in size.   

  7. Place dough on a lightly floured surface and divide into 12 equal pieces.  Roll each piece into a ball and place evenly spaced on the prepared baking sheet.  

  8. Beat the second egg with 1 tablespoon of water.  Use a pastry brush or your fingers to brush each dough well with egg wash.  Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour, or until puffed.  

  9. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown and internal temperature reads about 180°F / 82°C.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you don’t have buttermilk or sour milk, you can make your own sour milk by adding 1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar per 1 cup milk.

  • After you've made the dough, you can place the dough in the fridge before the first or second ferment.  That way the ferment will happen slowly in the fridge, and you can shape or bake the rolls the next day.  Allow the dough to come to room temperature before rolling or baking, then continue as instructed.

  • Use any leftover egg wash for another baking venture or omelette!

brioche, brioche rolls, poor man's brioche, recipe, chocolate chip brioche, butter
Bread, Breakfast
French
Yield: 12
Author:

Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

Buttery, soft, sweet, enriched brioche rolls speckled with chocolate chips.
prep time: 55 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 85 M

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups / 300g all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp / 6g instant yeast
  • 1/3 / 67g cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp / 11g salt
  • 1/2 cup / 118g milk
  • 1/2 cup / 118g buttermilk or sour milk
  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter, room temperature
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/3 cup / 234g chocolate chips or chunks

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix together flour, yeast, sugar, and salt.
  3. In a small saucepan heat milk and buttermilk until about 105°F / 40°C. Add to flour mixture and mix until well combined.
  4. With the mixer running, add butter and allow to mix until fully immersed. Add 1 egg.
  5. Switch to the dough hook and knead on medium speed for 6-8 minutes, until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl and starts to make a slapping sound against the bowl. If the dough is still clinging to the sides, add a touch more flour until it no longer sticks.
  6. Mix in chocolate chips just long enough to incorporate.
  7. Transfer dough to a large oiled bowl. Flip the dough so that both sides are now oiled. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to ferment in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours, or until doubled in size.
  8. Place dough on a lightly floured surface and divide into 12 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and place evenly spaced on the prepared baking sheet.
  9. Beat the second egg with 1 tablespoon of water. Use a pastry brush or your fingers to brush each dough well with egg wash. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour, or until puffed.
  10. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown and internal temperature reads about 180°F / 82°C.

NOTES:

If you don’t have buttermilk or sour milk, you can make your own sour milk by adding 1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar per 1 cup milk. After you've made the dough, you can place the dough in the fridge before the first or second ferment. That way the ferment will happen slowly in the fridge, and you can shape or bake the rolls the next day. Allow the dough to come to room temperature before rolling or baking, then continue as instructed. Use any leftover egg wash for another baking venture or omelette!

Calories

265.01

Fat (grams)

12.95

Sat. Fat (grams)

7.58

Carbs (grams)

34.61

Fiber (grams)

1.96

Net carbs

32.65

Sugar (grams)

13.04

Protein (grams)

5.38

Sodium (milligrams)

439.38

Cholesterol (grams)

47.41
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_4900.jpg

Very Chocolate Cherry Brownies

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We bakers like to stick to the four main food groups: Chocolate, chooooocolate, chocolat, and cioccolato.  Although we no longer believe, as the Aztecs did, that chocolate is a gift from the gods nor do we throw away the golden goblet once the chocolate drink has been consumed (haven't you heard about recycling?! Sheesh), we'll take it for its taste and possible health properties.  I say possible because it hasn't been scientifically proven yet.  But we know in our hearts, right?  So, let's make some Very Chooooocolate brownies.  And throw in some cherries because it's just about cherry season and I grew up in a cherry town.  National Cherry Festival, anyone?  


Very Chocolate Cherry Brownies

Makes about 9-12 brownies

Ingredients:

  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter

  • 1 1/3 cup / 225g chopped bittersweet or semisweet chocolate bar, or chips

  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar

  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract

  • 2 eggs

  • 1/3 cup / 40g all-purpose flour

  • 2/3 cup / 115g bittersweet or semisweet chocolate chips

  • generous 1/2 cup / 110g dried cherries

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Grease an 8x8in / 20x20cm square pan.

  1. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over low heat.  Add the chocolate and stir continuously until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. 

  2. Remove from the heat and add sugar and vanilla.  Beat in the eggs, one at a time.  

  3. Add the flour and stir vigorously for about a minute, until the batter turns from grainy to glossy, and starts to pull away from the edges of the pan.  Add chocolate chips and cherries.

  4. Pour into prepared pan and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until center isn't quite set or a toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If using semisweet chocolate I prefer to reduce the sugar to 125g or about a generous 1/2 cup. 

  • Don't over-bake brownies!  In my opinion, brownies are always better off on the dense, slightly under-baked side than dry or crispy.  

  • Nut fan?  Add 1/2 cup walnut, pecans, or your nut of choice! 

American
Yield: 9-12 servings
Author:

Very Chocolate Cherry Brownies

Dense, fudgy, double chocolate brownies loaded with chocolate chunks and tart dried cherries.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 50 M

ingredients:

  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter
  • 1 1/3 cup / 225g chopped bittersweet or semisweet chocolate bar, or chips
  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar
  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup / 40g all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup / 115g bittersweet or semisweet chocolate chips
  • generous 1/2 cup / 110g dried cherries

instructions:

How to cook Very Chocolate Cherry Brownies

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Grease an 8x8in / 20x20cm square pan.
  2. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over low heat. Add the chocolate and stir continuously until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth.
  3. Remove from the heat and add sugar and vanilla. Beat in the eggs, one at a time.
  4. Add the flour and stir vigorously for about a minute, until the batter turns from grainy to glossy, and starts to pull away from the edges of the pan. Add chocolate chips and cherries.
  5. Pour into prepared pan and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until center isn't quite set or a toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean.

NOTES:

If using semisweet chocolate I prefer to reduce the sugar to 125g or about a generous 1/2 cup. Don't over-bake brownies! In my opinion, brownies are always better off on the dense, slightly under-baked side than dry or crispy. Nut fan? Add 1/2 cup walnut, pecans, or your nut of choice!

Calories

387.92

Fat (grams)

20.18

Sat. Fat (grams)

11.93

Carbs (grams)

54.18

Fiber (grams)

2.66

Net carbs

51.53

Sugar (grams)

45.56

Protein (grams)

3.67

Sodium (milligrams)

82.56

Cholesterol (grams)

61.64
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 9 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Lemon Cream Tart

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

I've been on a French kick recently.  This past Christmas I was gifted "The Art of French Classics" by Jacquy Pfeiffer.  At first glance it seemed detailed, confusing, and lengthy.  Second glance didn't get much better.  This was not the type of book you would use to whip up a batch of cookies or bake a cake for dessert tonight.  No, this book was going to require time, diligence, patience, determination, and careful reading.  

I decided to dissect this book by my favorite method: list making.  Simple and efficient.  I started employing this method when I was 13.  My mom had bought me a cake mix cookbook by Betty Crocker, and I was thrilled to have my own cookbook to go through and cook all on my own.  Most of those recipes I would shudder at now (they're not completely from scratch, haha!!), but I wanted to make everything in there.  Well, almost.  Which is where the list came in.  I wrote down every recipe I wanted to make, referencing the page numbers. When I had made a recipe, I would put a check mark by it.  Much easier to glance at one page (or two or three, there were too many recipes I wanted to make!) than to go through the book every time.  And oh so satisfying to make that little check mark. But, I am a nerd when it comes to baking, so you can take this as more of an anecdote than a recommendation.  :)

After initially being intimidated from reading “The Art of French Pastry” and applying my list method, I realized it wouldn’t be so difficult to make a lot of these recipes, after all. Some recipes, yes, which include making puff pastry, choux pastry, and various pastry creams and caramel all for one magnificent cake, but if French cuisine was easy we would all be making cream puffs, croissants, and eclairs everyday now, wouldn’t we? But to my pleasant surprise many of the recipes were quite manageable. This book helps you master some basic techniques that then become easier because you use them often for many of the recipes.

One of the simpler, but nonetheless delicious recipes from the cookbook is this Lemon Cream Tart.  Everyone should have a good lemon tart in their repertoire.  Someone once asked me, after learning I liked to bake, if I could make a good lemon tart.  I had made good lemon tarts before, but sometimes I lack confidence that even if I like something, will it live up to other people's tastes buds?  Until I find the recipe, that is.  Then I know the search is over, although I will always be open to trying new things.  I hung on to my current lemon tart recipe, but I felt like I could do better.  A recipe that would be reliable, and deliver that over-the-top creamy, lemony zing.  I think I found it in this recipe, oh yes.  

You’ll notice in my photos that the lemon tart is decorated with meringues and candied orange peels. The recipe does not include those because I feel that for the time spent making them, they don’t add significantly to the eating experience and are more for the wow factor. Don’t get me wrong, they’re yummy, but meringues do require a certain technique (mine unfortunately cracked a bit) and candying orange peel requires 10 days. So. I more than encourage you to get the book and try out those recipes yourselves, and especially the others, like the croissants, palmiers (my absolute favorite recipe from the cookbook), the brioche variations, eclairs, and I could keep going! Or, if all this seems a bit ambitious to you, gift the book to your favorite baking enthusiast and have them make them for you. :)

Recipe adapted from “The Art of French Pastry” by Jacquy Pfeiffer.


*Note:  Make the pâte sablée at least one day ahead as it needs to rest overnight in the refrigerator; two nights is ideal.    

Lemon Cream Tart

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Pâte Sablée

  • 6 Tbsp / 97g butter

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt

  • 1 cup + 1 Tbsp / 145g all-purpose flour

  • 3 Tbsp / 18g almond flour

  • 1/2 cup / 55g powdered sugar

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g vanilla extract

  • 2 egg yolks

For the Lemon Cream

  • 1 cup / 200g sugar

  • 5/8 cup / 140g lemon juice

  • pinch of salt

  • 3 eggs + 1 yolk

  • zest of half a lemon

  • 14 Tbsp / 192g butter, softened and cut into cubes

  • candied lemon peel, toasted nuts, or meringues for decoration, optional

Directions:

Make the Pâte Sablée (2-3 Days Ahead of time)

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add butter, sea salt, and all-purpose flour.  Mix on low until just crumbly.  Over-mixing will active gluten in flour and make for a tougher crust.  Add almond flour and powdered sugar, mixing until just combined.  Add vanilla and egg yolks on medium speed until just combined.  

  2. Scrape dough out onto a sheet of plastic wrap.  Press into a 1/2 inch rectangle and wrap airtight in the plastic.  Refrigerate overnight.  

The next day:

  1. Very lightly grease a tart pan with softened butter, just enough to keep it from sticking.  You should barely see the butter on the pan.  If it is over-greased the dough may slip down the side as it is baking.  

  2. Remove the dough from the fridge, unwrap from the plastic, and place on a lightly floured surface.  For easier transportation, you can roll it out on a floured silpat or piece of parchment paper.  

  3. Tap the dough with a rolling pin to make sure it's pliable.  If at any point the dough seems too stiff or cold, or cracks as you roll it out, let it rest at room temperature for a few minutes before continuing.  Roll the dough 3 times in one direction, then make a quarter turn.   Periodically check to make sure your dough isn't sticking to the surface.  If it is, use a thin spatula to peel it off and re-flour the surface underneath.  Repeat rolling 3 times and making quarter turns until you have an evenly rolled out, 1/4" thick round of dough.

  4. At this point your dough should be larger than your tart pan.  Carefully transfer the dough to the pan.  You can do this by gently wrapping the dough around the rolling pin, then unrolling it over the pan.  Press the dough into the pan, paying careful attention to the corners and being careful not to stretch or tear the dough to do so.  Use a knife to trim away any extra dough.  Refrigerate the tart shell uncovered for at least one hour, or preferably overnight.  

An hour later or the next day:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F / 160°C.  

  2. Remove the crust from the fridge and dock the bottom with a fork.  (Poke holes in it.)  This will allow steam to escape evenly during baking.  

  3. Line the shell with parchment paper or cheesecloth and pie weights, dry beans, or rice.

  4. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove the parchment paper and pie weights.  Bake for an additional 5-15 minutes, or until the crust begins to evenly color and turn golden.  Allow to cool.

Make the Lemon Cream

  1. In a small bowl, combine half of the sugar, lemon juice, and salt; whisk until sugar and salt have dissolved.  

  2. In a medium bowl, combine the remaining half of sugar with egg yolks and whisk for 30 seconds.  Whisk the first lemon juice mixture into this mixture and add the zest.  

  3. Create a water bath by simmering 1 inch of water in a medium saucepan over low heat.  Place the lemon mixture over the saucepan, making sure the bottom of the bowl isn't touching the water; whisk constantly so the eggs don't scramble.  Attach a digital thermometer to the bowl and continue to whisk until mixture reaches 176-179.6°F / 80-82°C.  

  4. Remove from the heat and strain into a bowl through a fine-meshed sieve.  Use a spatula to push mixture through the strainer, if necessary.  Transfer thermometer to the new bowl.  Allow mixture to cool to 140°F / 60°C, about 5 minutes.  

  5. At this point pour the mixture into a blender, or leave in the bowl if using an immersion blender.  Add half of the butter and blend, then add second half of the butter and blend for an additional 30 seconds or so, until mixture is completely smooth.  

  6. Pour the lemon cream into the baked crust and allow to set for at least 2 hours in the refrigerator.  Decorate as desired, dust with powdered sugar, or leave as is. 

Buon Appetit!

Jenny's Notes:

  • Although this recipe may seem lengthy and entailed, it's quite simple, especially if you separate it into a "crust" day and a "filling" day.  

  • The unbaked pâte sablée will keep well covered in the fridge for up to a week, or a month in the freezer.  

Jacquy Pfeiffer, The Art of French Pastry, French classics, lemon tart, Pâte Sablée, butter crust, French tart, French lemon
French
Yield: 8-12
Author:

Lemon Cream Tart

Lemony, creamy, zingy tart with a perfect butter tart crust from Jacquy Pfeiffer's "The Art of French Pastry."
prep time: 1 H & 10 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 1 H & 40 M

ingredients:

For the Pâte Sablée
  • 6 Tbsp / 97g butter
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt
  • 1 cup + 1 Tbsp / 145g all-purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp / 18g almond flour
  • 1/2 cup / 55g powdered sugar
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g vanilla extract
  • 2 egg yolks
For the Lemon Cream
  • 1 cup / 200g sugar
  • 5/8 cup / 140g lemon juice
  • pinch of salt
  • 3 eggs + 1 yolk
  • zest of half a lemon
  • 14 Tbsp / 192g butter, softened and cut into cubes
  • candied lemon peel, toasted nuts, or meringues for decoration, optional

instructions:

How to cook Lemon Cream Tart

Make the Pâte Sablée (2-3 Days Ahead of time)
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add butter, sea salt, and all-purpose flour. Mix on low until just crumbly. Over-mixing will active gluten in flour and make for a tougher crust. Add almond flour and powdered sugar, mixing until just combined. Add vanilla and egg yolks on medium speed until just combined.
  2. Scrape dough out onto a sheet of plastic wrap. Press into a 1/2 inch rectangle and wrap airtight in the plastic. Refrigerate overnight.
The next day:
  1. Very lightly grease a tart pan with softened butter, just enough to keep it from sticking. You should barely see the butter on the pan. If it is over-greased the dough may slip down the side as it is baking.
  2. Remove the dough from the fridge, unwrap from the plastic, and place on a lightly floured surface. For easier transportation, you can roll it out on a floured silpat or piece of parchment paper.
  3. Tap the dough with a rolling pin to make sure it's pliable. If at any point the dough seems too stiff or cold, or cracks as you roll it out, let it rest at room temperature for a few minutes before continuing. Roll the dough 3 times in one direction, then make a quarter turn. Periodically check to make sure your dough isn't sticking to the surface. If it is, use a thin spatula to peel it off and re-flour the surface underneath. Repeat rolling 3 times and making quarter turns until you have an evenly rolled out, 1/4" thick round of dough.
  4. At this point your dough should be larger than your tart pan. Carefully transfer the dough to the pan. You can do this by gently wrapping the dough around the rolling pin, then unrolling it over the pan. Press the dough into the pan, paying careful attention to the corners and being careful not to stretch or tear the dough to do so. Use a knife to trim away any extra dough. Refrigerate the tart shell uncovered for at least one hour, or preferably overnight.
An hour later or the next day:
  1. Preheat oven to 325°F / 160°C.
  2. Remove the crust from the fridge and dock the bottom with a fork. (Poke holes in it.) This will allow steam to escape evenly during baking.
  3. Line the shell with parchment paper or cheesecloth and pie weights, dry beans, or rice.
  4. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove the parchment paper and pie weights. Bake for an additional 5-15 minutes, or until the crust begins to evenly color and turn golden. Allow to cool.
Make the Lemon Cream
  1. In a small bowl, combine half of the sugar, lemon juice, and salt; whisk until sugar and salt have dissolved.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the remaining half of sugar with egg yolks and whisk for 30 seconds. Whisk the first lemon juice mixture into this mixture and add the zest.
  3. Create a water bath by simmering 1 inch of water in a medium saucepan over low heat. Place the lemon mixture over the saucepan, making sure the bottom of the bowl isn't touching the water; whisk constantly so the eggs don't scramble. Attach a digital thermometer to the bowl and continue to whisk until mixture reaches 176-179.6°F / 80-82°C.
  4. Remove from the heat and strain into a bowl through a fine-meshed sieve. Use a spatula to push mixture through the strainer, if necessary. Transfer thermometer to the new bowl. Allow mixture to cool to 140°F / 60°C, about 5 minutes.
  5. At this point pour the mixture into a blender, or leave in the bowl if using an immersion blender. Add half of the butter and blend, then add second half of the butter and blend for an additional 30 seconds or so, until mixture is completely smooth.
  6. Pour the lemon cream into the baked crust and allow to set for at least 2 hours in the refrigerator. Decorate as desired, dust with powdered sugar, or leave as is.

NOTES:

Although this recipe may seem lengthy and entailed, it's quite simple, especially if you separate it into a "crust" day and a "filling" day. The unbaked pâte sablée will keep well covered in the fridge for up to a week, or a month in the freezer.

Calories

511.91

Fat (grams)

34.15

Sat. Fat (grams)

19.79

Carbs (grams)

47.48

Fiber (grams)

0.89

Net carbs

46.58

Sugar (grams)

32.22

Protein (grams)

6.01

Sodium (milligrams)

331.90

Cholesterol (grams)

211.17
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings and does not include toppings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_4714.jpg

Tourte Milanese

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Tourte Milanese, also known as Tourte Milanaise.  No, the second version does not include mayonnaise.  Part of the family en croute, or encased in dough.  Who doesn't want to eat food, soup, and anything edible wrapped in flaky, buttery dough?  In this case, roasted peppers, herbed scrambled eggs, cheese, spinach, and meat.  

You will feel quite accomplished pulling this out of the oven, and taking your first bite into the explosion of hot, flaky layers, melty cheese, herbs, sweet peppers, smoky meat, and garlicky spinach.  It may look intimidating, but you can adjust this recipe to how much time and effort you want to put into it.  For example, you can make your own puff pastry, or you can pick it up at the store.  You could roast your own peppers, or buy a jar of already roasted peppers.  Of course, I enjoy making everything as home-made and from scratch as possible...clearly don't have kids yet.  I recommend reading through the recipe once or twice and taking a peek at my notes at the bottom to make your game plan.  For example, puff pastry can easily be a two day recipe, so you'll want to make that a day ahead, or way ahead, and freeze it until you have the urge to make a recipe like this.  

Want some inspiration?  Watch this fun video of Julia Child and Michel Richard making Puff Pastry and Tourte Milanese!


Tourte Milanese

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Crust

  • 1 lb. / 450g puff pastry, home-made or store bought

  • Egg wash made from 1 egg beaten with 1 Tbsp water

For the Eggs

  • 10 eggs

  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh chives or green onion

  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or basil

  • 2 tsp snipped fresh tarragon or fresh or dried oregano

  • salt and ground pepper, to taste

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g butter

For the Rest of the Filling

  • 6 large red bell peppers (or use a 16oz jar or two of roasted red peppers)

  • 1 1/2 lbs / 680g spinach

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g olive oil

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter

  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

  • salt and pepper, to taste

  • 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg

  • 8 oz / 225g Swiss cheese

  • 8 oz / 225g smoked turkey or ham

Directions:

Generously grease an 8in / 20cm springform pan.  

Make the Crust

  1. Cut off 1/4 of the puff pastry, cover, and set aside.  

  2. Roll out the remaining pastry to 1/4" thick round.  Be sure to roll it thin enough so it will have a chance to be baked all the way through in the oven.  It should be big enough to cover the bottom and sides of your springform pan with an overhang.  Carefully press into pan, being sure to press all the way into the corners.  Cover and refrigerate.

  3. Roll out the remaining 1/4 of puff pastry until it is 1/4" thick.  Cut out an 8 in / 20cm circle, using an 8 in / 20cm pie plate or cake tin as a template.  Place on a plate or baking sheet, cover, and refrigerate.  

Make the Eggs

  1. Whisk eggs, herbs, salt and pepper together.  Melt butter in a skillet over low heat and pour in eggs.  Gently stir, continuously moving the setting eggs towards the center and allowing runny eggs to reach the bottom of the pan.  When the whole mixture has started to thicken, but still a bit runny, remove from heat and pour onto a plate. Cover and refrigerate and until ready to use.  

Roast the Peppers

Skip this step if you bought roasted red peppers.  

Method 1: Place peppers over an open flame on your stove top until blackened.  Flip and allow second side to roast.  Repeat until all peppers have been roasted.  

Method 2: Place all peppers onto a tinfoil lined sheet pan.  Place under broiler in your oven, checking every few minutes, until peppers are blackened.  Turn peppers over and roast second side.  

Once peppers have been roasted, place in an airtight container or ziploc bag for about 20 minutes to steam.  

Remove peppers and rub the skin off.  Cut out the stems and slice from top to bottom, laying them flat.  Remove seeds and trim away any inside veins.  

Place peppers on a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any excess liquid, cover, and refrigerate.  

Blanch and Sauté the Spinach

  1. Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil.  Add spinach and blanch for 1 minute.  Drain in a colander and rinse in cold water to stop it from cooking.  Press the spinach to remove excess liquid.  

  2. Place oil, butter, and garlic in a large frying pan over medium heat.  When garlic starts to sizzle, add blanched spinach and sauté for 3 minutes.  Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg.  Remove from heat and transfer spinach to a plate lined with paper towels.  Cover and refrigerate until needed.  

Assemble the Tourte

Preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.  

Remove the pastry lined pan from the fridge, along with your eggs, peppers, spinach, cheese, and turkey/ham.  Layer your ingredients in this order, laying them flat and spreading to the edge:

  1. Half of eggs

  2. Half of spinach

  3. Half of turkey/ham

  4. Half of cheese

  5. All the peppers

  6. Other half of cheese

  7. Other half of turkey/ham

  8. Other half of spinach

  9. Other half of eggs

Trim the pastry overhang to within 1 in / 2.5cm of the pan.  Brush the inner side with egg wash and fold over filling.  Brush the other side with more egg wash. 

Remove the round pastry top from fridge, re-rolling if it has shrunk any.  Place over the folded edges of the tourte, pressing down to seal it.  Brush with more egg wash.  Cut a vent in the center of the dough, or use a knife to trace a design.  Or, you can cut out shapes form the puff pastry scraps and decorate the top.  Brush shapes with more egg wash.  Chill assembled tourte in fridge for 30 minutes prior to baking.  

Place tourte on a tinfoil lined baking sheet and bake for 1 hour 10 minutes - 1 hour 30 minutes, or until pastry is puffed and a deep golden brown.  

Cool for 30 minutes before releasing from pan and serving.

Can be assembled a day ahead.  Keep in the refrigerator for up to a week.  To reheat, place in an oven preheated to 350°F / 177°C for 20-30 minutes. 

Jenny's Notes:

The recipe above is pretty traditional, however, it can easily be adjusted to your tastes.  

No soggy bottoms here!

No soggy bottoms here!

  • Before layering in the filling, I suggest sprinkling the bottom with a grated hard cheese, such as parmesan, or bread crumbs, to avoid the soggy-bottom syndrome. I did a combo of cheese and bread crumbs.

  • For the herbed scrambled eggs, chives, parsley, and tarragon combo is more traditional, but I prefer green onion, basil, and oregano. To be completely honest I've never had tarragon, but from what I've read I can't say I have a real desire to.

  • Feel free to use whichever color peppers you like! I roasted multi-colored mini sweet peppers. The white from the eggs (ish), green from the spinach, and red from the peppers is supposed to resemble the colors of the Italian flag, but hey. I'm just making Italy more colorful than it already it is.

  • 1 1/2 lbs of spinach may seem outrageous, but it really cooks down. I have used a scant pound before when that’s all I had, but the spinach is surprisingly delicious and I wouldn’t modify the recipe down if I had a choice.

  • Play around with cheeses! You'll want softer cheeses, ones that melt well. Think cheddar, gruyere, havarti, gouda, brie...I opted for half Swiss and half dill havarti. Two beautiful melting cheeses.

  • I pulled the tourte out of the oven after 1 hour 10 minutes, but it could have used more time to bake the pastry all the way through. It can be difficult to tell as your only clue is the color of the pastry.

Tourte Milanese, Julia Child, Michel Richard, spinach, roasted red peppers, en croute, scrambled eggs, cheese, puff pastry,turkey, Italian flag
breakfast, dinner
Italian, French
Yield: 8-12 Servings
Author:

Tourte Milanese

Layers of turkey, cheese, spinach, roasted red peppers, and eggs encased in flaky puff pastry.
prep time: 1 H & 35 Mcook time: 1 H & 30 Mtotal time: 2 H & 65 M

ingredients:

For the Crust
  • 1 lb. / 450g puff pastry, home-made or store bought
  • Egg wash made from 1 egg beaten with 1 Tbsp water
For the Eggs
  • 10 eggs
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh chives or green onion
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or basil
  • 2 tsp snipped fresh tarragon or fresh or dried oregano
  • salt and ground pepper, to taste
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g butter
For the Rest of the Filling
  • 6 large red bell peppers (or a 16oz jar or two of roasted red peppers)
  • 1 1/2 lbs / 680g spinach
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
  • 8 oz / 225g Swiss cheese
  • 8 oz / 225g smoked turkey or ham

instructions:

How to cook Tourte Milanese

Make the Crust
  1. Generously grease an 8in / 20cm springform pan.
  2. Cut off 1/4 of the puff pastry, cover, and set aside.
  3. Roll out the remaining pastry to 1/4" thick round. Be sure to roll it thin enough so it will have a chance to be baked all the way through in the oven. It should be big enough to cover the bottom and sides of your springform pan with an overhang. Carefully press into pan, being sure to press all the way into the corners. Cover and refrigerate.
  4. Roll out the remaining 1/4 of puff pastry until it is 1/4" thick. Cut out an 8 in / 20cm circle, using an 8 in / 20cm pie plate or cake tin as a template. Place on a plate or baking sheet, cover, and refrigerate.
Make the Eggs
  1. Whisk eggs, herbs, salt and pepper together. Melt butter in a skillet over low heat and pour in eggs. Gently stir, continuously moving the setting eggs towards the center and allowing runny eggs to reach the bottom of the pan. When the whole mixture has started to thicken, but still a bit runny, remove from heat and pour onto a plate. Cover and refrigerate and until ready to use.
Roast the Peppers
  1. Skip this step if you bought roasted red peppers.
  2. Method 1: Place peppers over an open flame on your stove top until blackened. Flip and allow second side to roast. Repeat until all peppers have been roasted.
  3. Method 2: Place all peppers onto a tinfoil lined sheet pan. Place under broiler in your oven, checking every few minutes, until peppers are blackened. Turn peppers over and roast second side.
  4. Once peppers have been roasted, place in an airtight container or ziploc bag for about 20 minutes to steam.
  5. Remove peppers and rub the skin off. Cut out the stems and slice from top to bottom, laying them flat. Remove seeds and trim away any inside veins.
  6. Place peppers on a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any excess liquid, cover, and refrigerate.
Blanch and Sauté the Spinach
  1. Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil. Add spinach and blanch for 1 minute. Drain in a colander and rinse in cold water to stop it from cooking. Press the spinach to remove excess liquid.
  2. Place oil, butter, and garlic in a large frying pan over medium heat. When garlic starts to sizzle, add blanched spinach and sauté for 3 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Remove from heat and transfer spinach to a plate lined with paper towels. Cover and refrigerate until needed.
Assemble the Tourte
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.
  2. Remove the pastry lined pan from the fridge, along with your eggs, peppers, spinach, cheese, and turkey/ham. Layer your ingredients in this order, laying them flat and spreading to the edge:
  3. Half of eggs
  4. Half of spinach
  5. Half of turkey/ham
  6. Half of cheese
  7. All the peppers
  8. Other half of cheese
  9. Other half of turkey/ham
  10. Other half of spinach
  11. Other half of eggs
  12. Trim the pastry overhang to within 1 in / 2.5cm of the pan. Brush the inner side with egg wash and fold over filling. Brush the other side with more egg wash.
  13. Remove the round pastry top from fridge, re-rolling if it has shrunk any. Place over the folded edges of the tourte, pressing down to seal it. Brush with more egg wash. Cut a vent in the center of the dough, or use a knife to trace a design. Or, you can cut out shapes form the puff pastry scraps and decorate the top. Brush shapes with more egg wash. Chill assembled tourte in fridge for 30 minutes prior to baking.
  14. Place tourte on a tinfoil lined baking sheet and bake for 1 hour 10 minutes - 1 hour 30 minutes, or until pastry is puffed and a deep golden brown.
  15. Cool for 30 minutes before releasing from pan and serving.
  16. Can be assembled a day ahead. Keep in the refrigerator for up to a week. To reheat, place in an oven preheated to 350°F / 177°C for 20-30 minutes.

NOTES:

Before layering in the filling, I suggest sprinkling the bottom with a grated hard cheese, such as parmesan, or bread crumbs, to avoid the soggy-bottom syndrome. I did a combo of cheese and bread crumbs. For the herbed scrambled eggs, chives, parsley, and tarragon combo is more traditional, but I prefer green onion, basil, and oregano. To be completely honest I've never had tarragon, but from what I've read I can't say I have a real desire to. Feel free to use whichever color peppers you like! I roasted multi-colored mini sweet peppers. The white from the eggs (ish), green from the spinach, and red from the peppers is supposed to resemble the colors of the Italian flag, but hey. I'm just making Italy more colorful than it already it is. 1 1/2 lbs of spinach may seem like a lot, but it really cooks down. Play around with cheeses! You'll want softer cheeses, ones that melt well. Think cheddar, gruyere, havarti, gouda, brie...I opted for half Swiss and half dill havarti. Two beautiful melting cheeses. I pulled the tourte from the oven after 1 hour 10 minutes, but it could have used more time to bake the pastry all the way through. It can be difficult to tell as your only clue is the color of the pastry.

Calories

653.54

Fat (grams)

44.19

Sat. Fat (grams)

13.43

Carbs (grams)

38.20

Fiber (grams)

4.08

Net carbs

34.12

Sugar (grams)

5.94

Protein (grams)

27.68

Sodium (milligrams)

762.57

Cholesterol (grams)

308.66
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

IMG_4755.jpg

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Going back to the classics.  American classics.  Chocolate chip cookies.  And not just any chocolate chip cookies, chocolate chip cookies the NY Times way.  Want me to say chocolate chip cookies one more time?  Chocolate. Chip. Cookies.  

Why do we need one more chocolate chip cookie recipe floating around?  

When it comes to the kitchen, I'm not one much for routine.  I like to explore, to try and constantly better what it is in my power to improve.  And as I am constantly learning about foods and why ingredients act the way they do, the more I can apply that to recipes.  When you have a classic such as chocolate chip cookies (yes, chocolate chip cookies) it may seem unnecessary to improve upon it.  Chances are, even if your recipe isn't that great, they probably will taste great anyway.  They're pretty hard to mess up.  That's also why there are so many chocolate chip cookie recipes out there.  People are satisfied with "good" when they don't know they're missing out on "great".  

I have three recipes for chocolate chip cookies)that I love, including the one I am about to share with you.  The other two include a classic recipe a.k.a. my mom’s famous chocolate chip cookies, and one with browned butter. You can find that one here.  I'm sure there are more out there that are wonderful.  But for now, I share with you another truly good recipe.  Courtesy of the NY Times, they knew what they were doing with this one.

The recipe includes bread flour and cake flour, lending a wonderful chew and delicate crumb, respectively.

Then there is the long refrigeration, which allows all the ingredients to marry and the flavor to concentrate as the dough dries out every so slightly.

When the cookies are finally baked, the sugar is able to crystallize easier resulting in beautiful golden edges with a center still soft, and an extra caramel nutty flavor.

Even if the refrigeration has to be skipped due to a time constraint, the cookies will still turn out delicious, although I would urge you to try the refrigeration for yourself to taste that extra special result!

Recipe adapted from the NY Times


NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes about 40-70 cookies, depending on size.

Ingredients:

  • 220g / 2 cups cake flour

  • 200g / 1 2/3 cup bread flour

  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking soda

  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking powder

  • 5g / 1 tsp salt

  • 283g / 1 1/4 cups unsalted butter

  • 250g / 1 1/4 cups light brown sugar

  • 225g / 1 generous cup granulated sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • 9g / 2 tsp vanilla extract

  • 566g / 20 oz. 60% bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

  1. Whisk together cake flour, bread flour, baking soda, and baking powder.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter and sugars together until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.  Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.  Add vanilla.  

  3. Add dry ingredients, mixing until just combined.  Carefully incorporate chocolate chips.  You may want to use a spoon as a stand mixer can crush the chocolate chips.  

  4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough for 24-72 hours. 

  5. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.  Scoop cold dough out onto cookie sheets in 1" balls, or desired size.  Sprinkle with a touch of sea salt, if you like.  Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until edges turn a nice golden brown and centers still look a bit soft.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • Why bread and cake flour?  Bread flour has a higher gluten content and lends more crisp and chew to the cookies.  Cake flour is finer and lends a delicate crumb.  

  • If you need these cookies the same day you are making the cookies, the refrigeration is not absolutely essential.  When you place a dough in the fridge, the moisture in the dough is able to be evenly absorbed, then after a time begins to dry out, concentrating the flavors.  Then, when you bake the cookies, the sugar is able to caramelize better.  That is the beautiful golden brown color you see, and nutty flavor you taste.  Also, a cold or refrigerated dough won't spread as much.    

chocolate chips, bread flour, cake flour, NY Times, cookies
Dessert
American
Yield: 40-70 cookies
Author:

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies get a remix with bread flour, cake flour, and the magic trick of refrigeration, resulting in nothing short of amazing cookies.
prep time: 30 Mcook time: 20 Mtotal time: 50 M

ingredients:

  • 220g / 2 cups cake flour
  • 200g / 1 2/3 cup bread flour
  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 5g / 1 tsp salt
  • 283g / 1 1/4 cups unsalted butter
  • 250g / 1 1/4 cups light brown sugar
  • 225g / 1 generous cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 9g / 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 566g / 20 oz. 60% bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks

instructions:

How to cook NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

  1. Whisk together cake flour, bread flour, baking soda, and baking powder.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter and sugars together until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla.
  3. Add dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Carefully incorporate chocolate chips. You may want to use a spoon as a stand mixer can crush the chocolate chips.
  4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough for 24-72 hours.
  5. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C. Scoop cold dough out onto cookie sheets in 1" balls, or desired size. Sprinkle with a touch of sea salt, if you like. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until edges turn a nice golden brown and centers still look a bit soft.

NOTES:

Why bread and cake flour? Bread flour has a higher gluten content and lends more crisp and chew to the cookies. Cake flour is finer and lends a delicate crumb. If you need these cookies the same day you are making the cookies, the refrigeration is not absolutely essential. When you place a dough in the fridge, the moisture in the dough is able to be evenly absorbed, then after a time begins to dry out, concentrating the flavors. Then, when you bake the cookies, the sugar is able to caramelize better. That is the beautiful golden brown color you see, and nutty flavor you taste. Also, a cold or refrigerated dough won't spread as much.

Calories

235.01

Fat (grams)

13.56

Sat. Fat (grams)

8.26

Carbs (grams)

24.83

Fiber (grams)

2.61

Net carbs

22.22

Sugar (grams)

11.36

Protein (grams)

3.66

Sodium (milligrams)

122.36

Cholesterol (grams)

24.84
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 1 cookie from a 40-cookie batch.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Buttermilk Bread

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when someone says, "Buttermilk"?  

For me, that would be buttermilk pancakes.  The lightest and fluffiest of all pancakes.  If you live in the south, maybe that's buttermilk biscuits.  Maybe your favorite cake recipe or scone recipe calls for buttermilk.  Whatever it may be, these delectable food items all have one thing in common:  Their light crumb, a.k.a. fluffiness.  The high acidity in the buttermilk reacts with the leavening agent, like baking soda, thus creating a beautiful rise, and a nice, light product.  

I don't often have buttermilk on hand; I find it much easier to make my own as I always have milk and lemon juice/vinegar on hand.  Lemon juice or vinegar are both very acidic and will have a similar effect on the leavening agent.  However, there is something so satisfying about using true buttermilk in a recipe.  After all, Milk and Lemon Juice Pancakes don't sound nearly as appealing as Buttermilk pancakes.   

So, a trip to the store, a carton of buttermilk bought, pancakes made and eaten.  Now, there is only 7/8 of a carton of buttermilk left in your fridge.  The likelihood of making 7 or more batches of buttermilk pancakes before the buttermilk goes bad is, well, not likely.  (But if you do, let me know, I’ll come live at your house!)  

The question remains, what I can do with the rest of this buttermilk without being wasteful?  Make buttermilk bread! (Another side note, if you like to drink buttermilk straight, well then.  You just can't relate with our buttermilk overload predicament, can you?)  The fluffiness factor we were talking about earlier still plays a role in this bread.  So fluffy.  Makes great toast.  And did I mention french toast?  Now you can serve buttermilk french toast! Oh yes.  Full circle, baby.  Actually, I don't really know where the circle started, so it's hard to tell if we actually came full circle...

On to the recipe! 

Recipe adapted from Jane's Sweets and Baking Journal


Buttermilk Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9x5 inch loaves

Ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620-740g all-purpose flour

  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast

  • 2 tsp / 10g salt

  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk

  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C.  Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.

  1. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt.  Mix together.  Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well.  Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.  

  2. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed.   This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand.  If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.

  3. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil.  Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.  

  4. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it.  Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.  

  5. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour.  Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action.  The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension.  If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth.  The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough.  This is called shaping a "Boule."  If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.  

  6. Repeat with other half of dough.  Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.

  7. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans.  Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour.  Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.  

  8. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam.  A spray bottle works well.  Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C.  Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.  

bread, white bread, carbs, buttermilk, toast, french toast bread
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Buttermilk Bread

A soft white bread made extra fluffy with the use of buttermilk. Great for toast and french toast.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 70 M

ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620g-740g all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast
  • 2 tsp / 10g salt
  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk
  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Buttermilk Bread

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.
  2. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt. Mix together. Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well. Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.
  3. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed. This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand. If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.
  4. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil. Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.
  5. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it. Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.
  6. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour. Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action. The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension. If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth. The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough. This is called shaping a "Boule." If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.
  7. Repeat with other half of dough. Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.
  8. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans. Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour. Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.
  9. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam. A spray bottle works well. Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C. Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.

Calories

161.19

Fat (grams)

2.00

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.28

Carbs (grams)

30.42

Fiber (grams)

1.12

Net carbs

29.30

Sugar (grams)

2.10

Protein (grams)

4.79

Sodium (milligrams)

239.83

Cholesterol (grams)

0.95
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from 20 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Whole Wheat Bread

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Simple, delicious, whole wheat bread.  No batons, bread machines, or rocket scientists required.  Actually, if you have a bread machine your bread making life is probably a lot simpler than mine.  I enjoy working the bread with my own hands, though.  It's very therapeutic and gives you a nice upper body workout.   Which means you could then eat more bread, yes?

Anyway, this is a simple, versatile bread, good for sandwiches, toast, and...bread.  

Recipe adapted from The Frugal Girl


Whole Wheat Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9in / 23cm loaves

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast

  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt

  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour

  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour

  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)

  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey

  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans. 

  1. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.  

  2. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil.  Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.  

  3. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.  

  4. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.  

  5. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it.  Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased.  Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.  

  6. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.  

  7. Separate dough into two equal pieces.  Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle.  It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches.  Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan.  Repeat with second piece.  

  8. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.  

  9. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes.  They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.  

  10. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan.

  • I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ.  Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile.  

  • The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.  I only eat pretty loaves.  ;)

vegan, dairy-free, whole wheat bread, wheat germ, honey, maple syrup, toast, french toast, whole wheat sandwich bread, homemade bread, loaves
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Whole Wheat Bread

Classic everyday whole wheat bread, great for sandwiches, toast, or anyway you like to eat bread!
prep time: 35 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 65 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast
  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt
  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour
  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)
  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey
  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Whole Wheat Bread

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans.
  2. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.
  3. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil. Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.
  4. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.
  5. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.
  6. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it. Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased. Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.
  7. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.
  8. Separate dough into two equal pieces. Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle. It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches. Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan. Repeat with second piece.
  9. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.
  10. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes. They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.
  11. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.

NOTES:

If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan. I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ. Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile. The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.

Calories

162.77

Fat (grams)

3.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.30

Carbs (grams)

29.38

Fiber (grams)

2.69

Net carbs

26.69

Sugar (grams)

2.54

Protein (grams)

4.53

Sodium (milligrams)

254.58

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from a 10-slice loaf.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

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Cream Cheese Coffee Cake. Think a delicate crumb, super moist with swirls of cream cheese making the coffee cake even softer, and a sweet crumble on top.

Coffee cakes (and scones) often get a bad rap for being dry. No one likes to eat something that makes their mouth feel like it’s full of sawdust. There is no need to make dry baked goods when there are so many good recipes out there! A good example? This Cream Cheese Coffee Cake recipe. I already have a few favorite NOT dry recipes like this Cinnamon Streusel Coffee Cake, but today’s Cream Cheese Coffee Cake really uh, takes the cake on the moist scale. I apologize if you don’t like the word “moist”, but I struggle finding suitable synonyms that get the same point across. If you have any ideas, I’m open to suggestions so I don’t offend some people’s sensibilities. :)

Now, post Valentine's Day, or Galentine's Day, you may need to take a break from chocolate.  No wait, never mind, that's silly.  Chocolate is always necessary.  What was I thinking?  But I'm sure you already have plenty of chocolate on your hands (maybe literally, put that candy bar down and get busy making this coffee cake) in the form of heart boxes, Dove dark chocolate with those hidden messages, Hershey's kisses, or in my case, Toblerone.  So instead, let's make a very white dessert (or breakfast, hey) with a delicate crumb and cheesecake filling.  Yes? Yes.


Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

Serves 12-16

Ingredients:

For the Filling

  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, softened

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 egg

For the Cake

  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g oil

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 1/2 cup / 123g yogurt or sour cream

For the Streusel

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g cold butter, cubed

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Greased 8x8in / 20x20cm square baking pan.

For the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat cream cheese until smooth, about 30 seconds. 

  2. Add sugar, vanilla, egg and beat on medium-low speed until combined.  Pour into another bowl and set aside. 

For the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. 

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine oil and sugar.  Beat in eggs one at a time.  Add vanilla. 

  3. Alternate adding the dry ingredients and yogurt to the oil and sugar mixture.  Dry, yogurt, dry, yogurt, dry.  Mix only until just combined after each addition. 

For the Streusel

  1. Combine sugar, flour, and butter in a small bowl with a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands until crumbles the size of pebbles appear.

Assembly

  1. Spread half of the cake batter in the bottom of prepared pan. 

  2. Pour and spread cream cheese filling evenly over batter; gently swirl.

  3. Spread remaining half of cake batter over cream cheese filling. 

  4. Evenly sprinkle streusel over the top.

  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean. 

Jenny's Notes:

  • Love coffee cake or serving at a party?  You can double this recipe and bake in a 9x13 inch pan.  Increase baking time to about 40 minutes.

cream cheese, coffee cake, streusel, cream cheese filling, swirl, moist
Breakfast, Dessert
American
Yield: 12-16 Servings
Author:

Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

Super moist coffee cake with a thick cream cheese swirl and delicate streusel topping.
prep time: 45 Mcook time: 25 Mtotal time: 70 M

ingredients:

For the Filling
  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
For the Cake
  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g oil
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 cup / 123g yogurt or sour cream
For the Streusel
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g cold butter, cubed

instructions:

How to cook Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

For the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat cream cheese until smooth, about 30 seconds.
  2. Add sugar, vanilla, egg and beat on medium-low speed until combined. Pour into another bowl and set aside.
For the Cake
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine oil and sugar. Beat in eggs one at a time. Add vanilla.
  3. Alternate adding the dry ingredients and yogurt to the oil and sugar mixture. Dry, yogurt, dry, yogurt, dry. Mix only until just combined after each addition.
For the Streusel
  1. Combine sugar, flour, and butter in a small bowl with a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands until crumbles the size of pebbles appear.
Assembly
  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Greased 8x8in / 20x20cm square baking pan.
  2. Spread half of the cake batter in the bottom of prepared pan.
  3. Pour and spread cream cheese filling evenly over batter; gently swirl.
  4. Spread remaining half of cake batter over cream cheese filling.
  5. Evenly sprinkle streusel over the top.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean.

NOTES:

Love coffee cake or serving at a party? You can double this recipe and bake in a 9x13 inch pan. Increase baking time to about 40 minutes.

Calories

269.85

Fat (grams)

13.92

Sat. Fat (grams)

6.21

Carbs (grams)

31.96

Fiber (grams)

0.47

Net carbs

31.48

Sugar (grams)

18.21

Protein (grams)

4.58

Sodium (milligrams)

270.60

Cholesterol (grams)

58.08
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Salted Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Bark

Pretzels. Homemade caramel. Chocolate. And salted. This bark has only 5 ingredients, it’s super easy to make, and you keep going back for more.

Oh yes.  For the sugar lovers, sweets devotees, and when you want to whip up something delicious with precious little effort, this bark is it.  Some people even refer to it as crack bark. Maybe because you break, or crack it, at the end?  (Just kidding everyone, I know what they mean when they call it that.)  Plus all 5 ingredients are pretty easy to have on hand. 

Now, if this were Pinterest, you could call it "5 Ingredient Crack Bark."  Remember my thing with Pinterest names?  Yep.  Still there.  Keep it classy, people, keep it classy.  It already bothers me that this recipe has as many words in its title as it does ingredients.  If you have any better and more concise ideas for the title, please, let me know!

Slightly adapted from Where the Cookies Are

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Salted Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Bark

Makes approximately one 11x17in / 28x43cm sheet of bark

Ingredients:

  • Enough mini pretzels to cover an approximately 11x17in / 28x43cm jelly roll pan, about half of a 15oz bag / 200g.

  • 1 cup / 226g butter

  • 1 cup / 200g brown sugar

  • 2 cups / 340g semi-sweet chocolate chips

  • coarse salt

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C.  Line an approximately 11x17in / 28x43cm jelly roll pan with tinfoil. 

  1. Cover pan with an even layer of pretzels.

  2. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, combine butter and brown sugar.  Stir until mixture starts to simmer, then allow to cook, without stirring, until mixture turns a nice golden-brown.  This should take 3-5 minutes after the mixture has started to simmer. 

  3. Remove mixture from heat and immediately pour evenly over pretzels. 

  4. Place in the oven and bake for 6 minutes. 

  5. Remove from oven and immediately sprinkle chocolate chips over pretzels and caramel. 

  6. Wait a few minutes, then use a spatula to spread now melted chocolate chips over pretzels.  Sprinkle with salt. 

  7. Allow to cool completely before breaking into pieces.  You can place your pan in the fridge or freezer to speed up the process. 

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you’re wondering what a jelly-roll pan is, it’s merely a baking sheet with about a 1in side around it, which in this case keeps the bark contained. You can shop them on Amazon by clicking on the link to the right. —>

  • Don't have tinfoil?  You can always use wax or parchment paper, but I would recommend greasing them beforehand as I have had the bark stick to both of those products. 

  • Want to go crazy?  Use any kind of chips in place of the semisweet chips, such as milk, peanut butter, bittersweet...or a combination! 

  • Once you have spread the melted chocolate, feel free to add some extra toppings if you wish.  Coconut, chopped peanuts, finely chopped coffee beans...

salted caramel, salted chocolate, bark, butter, toffee, caramel, chocolate chips, crack bark
dessert, snack
American
Yield: 12-15 servings
Author:

Salted Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Bark

Salty, crunchy, chocolatey, caramelly, and only 5 ingredients to whip up this addicting bark!
prep time: 25 Mcook time: 6 Mtotal time: 31 M

ingredients:

  • mini pretzels, enough to cover an approximately 11x17in / 28x43cm jelly roll pan, about half of a 15oz bag or 200g
  • 1 cup / 226g butter
  • 1 cup / 200g brown sugar
  • 2 cups / 340g semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • coarse salt

instructions:

How to cook Salted Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Bark

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Line an approximately 11x17in / 28x43cm jelly roll pan with tinfoil.
  2. Cover pan with an even layer of pretzels.
  3. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, combine butter and brown sugar. Stir until mixture starts to simmer, then allow to cook, without stirring, until mixture turns a nice golden-brown. This should take 3-5 minutes after the mixture has started to simmer.
  4. Remove mixture from heat and immediately pour evenly over pretzels.
  5. Place in the oven and bake for 6 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven and immediately sprinkle chocolate chips over pretzels and caramel.
  7. Wait a few minutes, then use a spatula to spread now melted chocolate chips over pretzels. Sprinkle with salt.
  8. Allow to cool completely before breaking into pieces. You can place your pan in the fridge or freezer to speed up the process.

NOTES:

If you’re wondering what a jelly-roll pan is, it’s merely a baking sheet with about a 1in side around it, which in this case keeps the bark contained. Don't have tinfoil? You can always use wax or parchment paper, but I would recommend greasing them beforehand as I have had the bark stick to both of those products. Want to go crazy? Use any kind of chips in place of the semisweet chips, such as milk, peanut butter, bittersweet...or a combination! Once you have spread the melted chocolate, feel free to add some extra toppings if you wish. Coconut, chopped peanuts, finely chopped coffee beans...

Calories

398.37

Fat (grams)

24.26

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.77

Carbs (grams)

47.86

Fiber (grams)

2.24

Net carbs

45.63

Sugar (grams)

31.99

Protein (grams)

3.04

Sodium (milligrams)

384.00

Cholesterol (grams)

40.49
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Pumpkin Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Pumpkin Bread. No, not that wonderful, dense, quick-bread pumpkin bread, but a light, yeasted bread made with PUMPKIN and spiced with nutmeg and ginger!!! And a beautiful cinnamon swirl. It makes a-may-zing toast. I think I say that about all my bread recipes. But it’s the truth. And I love toast.

Do you want to know something really sad, though? (You’re maybe thinking, uh no, scrolllll.) I’m blogging about this bread, and I can’t even eat it. (By choice, I guess I like to punish my body??) I’m going to tell you about it.

Ever heard of Whole30?  Me neither, up until last year.  Actually, New Year's Eve.  (Yes, only 2 weeks ago.  I know, I know, those "last year" jokes are so old, but I still get SO much entertainment out of them.  Too much.)  Anyway, I read about the Whole30 in an email from this informative and entertaining fitness site called Greatist.   Like all normal people, my first thought when I see things like ice cream and strange diets is to say, "I WANT TO BE A PART OF THAT."  Actually, I prefer the ice cream to be a part of me, meaning I ate it. 

I am not normally a spontaneous person by any means, but two days later I had commenced my very own #Whole30January.  Without even reading all the way through the guidelines.  It's almost easier to list what you can eat than what you can't.  But I'll start with what you can't, just because it's fun and I like to complain about it.  It's not even all that hard.  Especially with a buddy.  Just ask my Mom, she just loves doing this with me.

Not allowed:

  1. grain (not even quinoa)

  2. dairy (guess that ice cream is not going to become a part of me after all)

  3. sugar (say no to stevia)

  4. soy (watch out for sneaky ingredients like soy lecithin)

  5. alcohol (put down the vanilla extract)

  6. legumes (think beans and peanuts)

  7. sketchy preservatives like carageenan

That leaves you with veggies, fruits, eggs, nuts, meat, and all the sadness you want.  But you may not take any of those approved items and combine them to create something in the "cheat" category.  For example, you cannot combine eggs and bananas and pour it onto a griddle because that would be a pancake.  The goal is to break you of unhealthy relationships with food.  So instead of replacing everything you normally eat with healthier versions (because at the end of the 30 days you will most likely go back to the exact same way you ate before, and then nothing has changed) the goal is to explore and create new delicious and nutritious (and sad) food.  Ha ok I'm done being sardonic.  If you want to read more about Whole30, click here.  

So in the midst of these January blues and food sadness, I will share with you this recipe for pumpkin cinnamon swirl bread so you can eat it in my stead.  While you're at it, would you also eat some cheese and every other kind of bread that exists for me?  Thanks. 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from Cooking Classy


Pumpkin Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients:

For the Bread

  • 2 1/4 tsp / 7g active dry yeast

  • 1/4 cup / 60g warm water, 110°F / 43°F

  • 1/4 cup / 50g + 1/2 tsp sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 60g warm milk, 110°F / 43°C

  • 2 Tbsp / 42g molasses

  • 3/4 tsp salt

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g oil

  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 1/4 tsp ginger

  • 1 egg

  • 1 cup / 246g pumpkin puree

  • 3 1/2 - 4 cups / 420g - 480g all-purpose flour

For the Cinnamon Swirl

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 21g butter, melted

  • 1/3 cup / 67g brown sugar

  • 2 tsp cinnamon

Directions:

Make the Bread

Oven 375°F / 190°C.  1 greased bread pan, approximately 9x5in / 23x13cm.

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine yeast, water, and 1/2 tsp of sugar.  Allow to sit until yeast starts to bubble, about 5 minutes.

  2. Stir in the milk, molasses, remaining sugar, salt, oil, nutmeg, ginger, egg, and pumpkin until combined. 

  3. Switch to a dough hook and slowly add flour.  Continue adding flour until a soft, but not too sticky dough is achieved. 

  4. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 1-2 minutes. 

  5. Place in an oiled bowl, flip so that both sides are oiled, and cover with a towel. Allow to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour. 

  6. While the bread is rising, whisk together brown sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl.  Set aside.

  7. When the bread is doubled in size, punch down and turn out onto a lightly floured surface.  Roll out into a rectangle, about 22x8in / 56x20cm. 

  8. Spread melted butter over dough, going within 1/2in / 1cm of edge.  Sprinkle cinnamon sugar mixture evenly over butter.

  9. Starting from one of the short sides (the approximate 8in / 20cm) roll dough into a loaf.  Place in prepared loaf pan seam side down. 

  10. Cover with a towel and let rise again until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. 

  11. Bake in preheated oven for 35-40 minutes, or until bread sounds hollow to the tap and an internal temperature reaches about 190°F / 88°C. 

Jenny's Notes:

  • If using instant yeast instead of instant active dry yeast, you can skip step 1. and add all the ingredients from step 1. and 2. together, then proceed to step 3. The reason for this is because active dry yeast is dried and needs to be reactivated in some warm liquid and a bit of sugar before adding to the rest of the ingredients. Instant yeast is ready to be added in without any extra prep.

  • This bread is delicious toasted!  And if you're really a pumpkin fan, might I mention pumpkin butter?

yeasted bread, yeast, pumpkin puree, canned pumpkin, pumpkin bread, cinnamon swirl
bread, breakfast
American
Yield: 12-14
Author:

Pumpkin Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Light, yeasted pumpkin bread spiced with ginger and nutmeg with a beautiful cinnamon swirl.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 40 Mtotal time: 90 M

ingredients:

For the Bread
  • 2 1/4 tsp / 7g active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup / 60g warm water, 110°F / 43°F
  • 1/4 cup / 50g + 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 60g warm milk, 110°F / 43°C
  • 2 Tbsp / 42g molasses
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g oil
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup / 246g pumpkin puree
  • 3 1/2 - 4 cups / 420g - 480g all-purpose flour
For the Cinnamon Swirl
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 21g butter, melted
  • 1/3 cup / 67g brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon

instructions:

How to cook Pumpkin Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Make the Bread
  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. 1 greased bread pan, approximately 9x5in / 23x13cm.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine yeast, water, and 1/2 tsp of sugar. Allow to sit until yeast starts to bubble, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the milk, molasses, remaining sugar, salt, oil, nutmeg, ginger, egg, and pumpkin until combined.
  4. Switch to a dough hook and slowly add flour. Continue adding flour until a soft, but not too sticky dough is achieved.
  5. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 1-2 minutes.
  6. Place in an oiled bowl, flip so that both sides are oiled, and cover with a towel. Allow to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  7. While the bread is rising, whisk together brown sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl. Set aside.
  8. When the bread is doubled in size, punch down and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll out into a rectangle, about 22x8in / 56x20cm.
  9. Spread melted butter over dough, going within 1/2in / 1cm of edge. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar mixture evenly over butter.
  10. Starting from one of the short sides (the approximate 8in / 20cm) roll dough into a loaf. Place in prepared loaf pan seam side down.
  11. Cover with a towel and let rise again until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
  12. Bake in preheated oven for 35-40 minutes, or until bread sounds hollow to the tap and an internal temperature reaches about 190°F / 88°C.

NOTES:

If using instant yeast instead of instant active dry yeast, you can skip step 1. and add all the ingredients from step 1. and 2. together, then proceed to step 3. The reason for this is because active dry yeast is dried and needs to be reactivated in some warm liquid and a bit of sugar before adding to the rest of the ingredients. Instant yeast is ready to be added in without any extra prep.

Calories

219.22

Fat (grams)

3.60

Sat. Fat (grams)

1.28

Carbs (grams)

41.35

Fiber (grams)

2.07

Net carbs

39.28

Sugar (grams)

9.02

Protein (grams)

5.33

Sodium (milligrams)

170.35

Cholesterol (grams)

19.66
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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