Jeannie's Healthy Breakfast Cookies

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What could be better than a cookie? How about a cookie that’s packed with nutrients and can be eaten anytime, especially for breakfast, guilt free?

I love cookies. They are my go-to when I want to whip up something with limited time, or don’t have much energy for other more entailed desserts. I’m sure this has NOTHING to do with the fact that cookies are also one of my favorite things to eat. It ends up turning into a win-win-win situation because I’m having fun, being productive, get to eat some of the ingredients while baking, get to eat some dough while baking, and BONUS if there is enough dough to actually be baked into cookies! So many wins.

I have to bring up the negative, however, to classic cookie baking. They’re kinda calorific and not very good for you. I’m all for eating cookies for breakfast, but that usually goes along with a sugar crash later on. What to do?

Bake healthy cookies! They have to be delicious of course, and not gross. I have just the recipe for you, made up by my mom many years ago when we needed a portable nutritious breakfast for a trip. This recipe has been in my recipe box ever since as “Jean’s breakfast cookies”, made with many adjustments because the add ins are very versatile depending on your tastes. My mom likes to be called Jeannie (not by her kids of course) so I adapted the title accordingly.

One thing this recipe is not is a taste-alike recipe to say, chocolate chip cookies with a surprise twist that it’s healthy. Nope, these cookies have a satisfyingly healthy look and taste and are upfront about it from the get go. They get positive feedback and recipe requests wherever they go!

The recipe that follows is just one version of many, many possibilities. Just keep in mind that major adjustments may need other adjustments. For example, if you don’t have any honey or maple syrup on hand for the sweetener, you could use raw or regular cane sugar. Substituting a liquid for a dry ingredient, however, will mean you may need more liquid from elsewhere. Maybe add another egg, a bit more oil, or even water until you get a cookie dough consistency once again. Other ideas to make the recipe your own:

  • Use any kind of flour you wish instead of wheat flour. Oat flour, almond flour, coconut flour…I often use wheat germ in place of part of the flour or flaxmeal, usually 1/4 cup.

  • If you want these cookies to be gluten-free, ensure that your oats are gluten-free, and use a gluten-free flour.

  • Change up the spices. Sometimes towards fall I also add a bit of ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Cardamom is also nice.

  • Beyond dried fruit and walnuts, get creative with your add-ins! Just try not to go too far beyond 1 cup, otherwise there might not be enough dough to hold everything together. In the photos on this post I used dried apples, dried cranberries, and walnuts. I’ve also added various combinations of dried cherries, prunes, dried apricots, raisins, dates, dried figs, dried pears, fresh apples, grated coconut, pecans, hazelnuts, dark chocolate, crystallized ginger, and anything else I had on hand!

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Recipe adapted from my mama


Jeannie’s Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Makes about 18-22 cookies

Ingredients:

2019-02-17 14.45.17.jpg
  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive or coconut oil

  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour

  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats

  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped

  • 1/2 apple, diced

  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.

  1. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.

  2. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.

  3. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.

  4. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder.

  • olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil.

  • 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

healthy, nutritious, cookies, gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, dried fruit, apple, fall spices, oats, nuts, coconut, portable
breakfast, dessert, snack
American
Yield: 12-16 cookies
Author:

Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

Healthy cookies packed with nutritious ingredients that make for a great breakfast or anytime snack. Dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and can easily be made gluten-free.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: 10 Mtotal time: 30 M

ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive oil or coconut oil
  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 apple, diced
  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

instructions:

How to cook Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.
  3. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
  4. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.
  5. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

NOTES:

you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder. olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil. 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

Calories

265.40

Fat (grams)

15.87

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.49

Carbs (grams)

27.23

Fiber (grams)

3.34

Net carbs

23.89

Sugar (grams)

9.53

Protein (grams)

5.72

Sodium (milligrams)

188.36

Cholesterol (grams)

31.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Simple Thai Noodles

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This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Some nights you get caught unprepared and need something quick to whip up for dinner. Or maybe that’s every night? I know Sunday food prepping is all the rage, and it’s a really great idea…if you’re only feeding yourself or a small family, and not taking into account the unexpected that happens. Even if you’re the most organized person cooking just for yourself, those nights are going to spring up on you when you want something quick and easy, delicious, and you have all the ingredients on hand. This recipe for Simple Thai Noodles falls in that category.

Sesame oil might not be in everyone’s pantry, but if you invest in a bottle, it can last you months, depending on how often you make Asian or other dishes that often call for sesame oil. It really is worth it, if you try and substitute another oil it won’t be the same. It lends such a nutty depth to dishes!

I actually have several versions of lo mein, Thai noodles, fried rice, etc. and even a couple more waiting to be tried that all have in common varying quantities and varieties of green onion, sesame oil, soy sauce, ginger, peanuts or peanut butter, and a sweet and a spicy element. Each with their merits, and the occasions for which I like to make them. If you can’t tell, I love Asian dishes, whether they’re authentic or simply inspired by Asian flavors.

This pasta is kept in my repertoire for its simplicity while still retaining all the delicious flavors, and now you can make it too, whether you’re in a pinch for a quick dinner, or not! No one said you have to make it only when in a pinch. :)

Recipe adapted from A Small Snippet


Simple Thai Noodles

Serves 6-8

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Ingredients:

  • 16 oz / 500g linguine or spaghetti

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g olive oil, or oil of choice

  • 1/4 cup / 54g sesame oil

  • about 1 Tbsp / 5g red pepper flakes

  • 3 Tbsp / 63g honey

  • 3 Tbsp / 45g soy sauce

  • cilantro, chopped peanuts, chopped green onions, julienned carrots, sesame seeds, or your choice of toppings

Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta according to directions on box; drain, and return to pot.

  2. While the pasta is cooking, whisk together the oils, red pepper flakes, honey, and soy sauce in a small bowl.

  3. When the pasta is done and drained, add the sauce to the noodles and toss to coat well.

  4. Serve immediately, adding toppings of choice.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • You can adjust the amount of red pepper flakes to suit your spicy preference. 1 Tbsp, as in the recipe, results in reasonably spicy, but not overwhelming. Also, you could use a spicy oil if you have some on hand instead of the red pepper flakes.

  • For a stronger sesame taste, use all sesame oil instead of olive oil. (6 Tbsp / 84g total of sesame oil.)

  • Feel free to add veggies or a protein, if you desire. For veggies, chop small and sauté in a pan with a bit of oil for a few minutes or until tender, toss in when you add the sauce. Cook your protein and slice as desired, add at the end on top of plates of pasta or mix in with sauce.

  • I’ll be honest with you, this usually serves 4, max…

Thai
Yield: 6-8 servings
Author:

Simple Thai Noodles

The simplest Thai noodles for a quick and easy dinner using ingredients already in your pantry.
prep time: 10 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 25 M

ingredients:

  • 16 oz / 500g linguine or spaghetti
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g olive oil, or oil of choice
  • 1/4 cup / 54g sesame oil
  • about 1 Tbsp / 5g red pepper flakes
  • 3 Tbsp / 63g honey
  • 3 Tbsp / 45g soy sauce
  • cilantro, chopped peanuts, chopped green onions, julienned carrots, sesame seeds, or your choice of toppings

instructions:

How to cook Simple Thai Noodles

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta according to directions on box; drain, and return to pot.
  2. While the pasta is cooking, whisk together the oils, red pepper flakes, honey, and soy sauce in a small bowl.
  3. When the pasta is done and drained, add the sauce to the noodles and toss to coat well.
  4. Serve immediately, adding toppings of choice.

NOTES:

You can adjust the amount of red pepper flakes to suit your spicy preference. 1 Tbsp, as in the recipe, results in reasonably spicy, but not overwhelming. Also, you could use a spicy oil if you have some on hand instead of the red pepper flakes. For a stronger sesame taste, use all sesame oil instead of olive oil. (6 Tbsp / 84g total of sesame oil.) Feel free to add veggies or a protein, if you desire. For veggies, chop small and sauté in a pan with a bit of oil for a few minutes or until tender, toss in when you add the sauce. Cook your protein and slice as desired, add at the end on top of plates of pasta or mix in with sauce. I’ll be honest with you, this usually serves 4, max…

Calories

294.66

Fat (grams)

14.65

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.10

Carbs (grams)

36.05

Fiber (grams)

2.12

Net carbs

33.93

Sugar (grams)

9.54

Protein (grams)

5.69

Sodium (milligrams)

418.72

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Calculated with green onion, carrots, and cilantro as toppings. Nutritional info is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_0876.jpg

Pistachio Cake with Honey Vanilla Buttercream

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Pistachios remind me of Christmas.  In fact, just this morning I had my first pang of "I miss Christmas," which usually hits me around July.  My family rarely eats/buys/uses pistachios, but we always have bowls of them out for Christmas.  It's tradition.  Beyond that, I never thought too much of cooking or baking with them because they were only ever around when we were already over inundated with food.  And yes, they are expensive and you may have to shell them.  

Then I went to Europe where pistachio gelato is the best flavor and the line up of pastries always includes pistachio right next to the chocolate and vanilla.  Pistachio was this flavor, this nut, that I had not tapped into.  And I've only just started.  Oh the thrills!  This cake was a light bulb of "What have I been missing out on!?" My poor family and friends, all these years and I didn't make this for them.  How selfish of me.  Selfish no more, here is the recipe so you can revel in the glory with me!

This cake is fluffy, light, with a wonderful, nutty pistachio flavor that is not overbearing. It has a slight elegance to it, something about being more than 2 layers and the white frosting.

The cake ingredients are fairly standard aside from the pistachios. If you have pistachio flour ready-made available to you, you can save yourself step. Maybe try Amazon, you can find anything online these days! If not, pistachios should be readily available, and you can make pistachio flour yourself by grinding them for a few seconds in a food processor. I don’t have a food processor in Italy, so I get by with an electric coffee grinder which works great!

The frosting is a light and creamy, not-too-sweet cooked frosting. Ever since the first time I’ve made a cooked frosting, the raves come pouring in about how it’s the best frosting they’ve ever eaten. Between cooked frostings and Italian meringue buttercream, I’ve rarely looked back at the traditional American buttercream that is mostly sugar. It has its place, but it seems the general consensus between anyone who has tried some of my cakes and cupcakes that a not-too-sweet frosting is GREATLY appreciated. Give the cooked frosting below a try and see if you don’t fall in love with it!

Recipe adapted from Joanne eats well with others


Pistachio Cake with Honey Vanilla Buttercream

Makes 1 3 layer 6-inch round cake. Serves about 8

Ingredients:

For the Pistachio Cake

  • 1/2 cup / 125g shelled pistachios

  • 1 1/4 cups / 164g cake flour

  • scant 1/2 cup / 47g all-purpose flour

  • 1 1/2 tsp / 7g baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt

  • scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil

  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar

  • 1 1/2 tsp / 7g vanilla extract

  • 1 egg

  • 3/4 cup / 178g ice water

  • 1 egg white

  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar

For the Honey Vanilla Buttercream

  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar

  • 3 Tbsp / 20g all-purpose flour

  • 3/4 cup / 178g milk

  • 3 Tbsp / 44g heavy whipping cream

  • 3/4 cup / 170g butter, cubed

  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract

  • 2 Tbsp / 42g honey

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Grease and line the bottoms of 3 6-inch cake rounds with parchment paper.

Make the Pistachio Cake

  1. Place the pistachios in a food processor and pulse until coarsely chopped.  Set aside 2 tablespoons.  Continue to pulse remaining pistachios until finely ground, like flour in texture.  

  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together pistachio flour, cake flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  

  3. In a normal bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, beat together oil, sugar, and vanilla.  Add egg and beat until just combined.  

  4. With the mixer on low, add the pistachio flour mixture to the batter in three additions, alternating with the ice water, beginning and ending with pistachio flour mixture.  After each addition mix until just combined.  

  5. In another medium bowl, beat the egg white with cream of tartar until soft peaks form, about 3-4 minutes.  Gently fold the egg white into the cake batter, starting with just a spoonful to lighten the batter, then continue on with the rest.  

  6. Pour batter into prepared cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.  Allow cakes to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then flip onto a wire rack to cool completely while you make the buttercream.  Remove parchment paper from bottoms.  

Make the Honey Vanilla Buttercream

  1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together sugar and flour.  Add milk and cream and place over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mixture boils and thickens, about 5-10 minutes.  

  2. Once thickened, pour mixture into a bowl of a stand mixer.  Beat on high until cool, 8-10 minutes.  Reduce speed to medium low and add butter, piece by piece, until fully incorporated.  Increase speed and beat a few minutes, until light and fluffy.  Beat in vanilla and honey.  

Assembly

Use a serrated knife to level off the top of the cakes.  Cut off just as much as necessary to make the top of the cake level and flat.  If you prefer domed cakes, leave one layer uncut for the top. Place one leveled layer on desired serving plate, cut side down.  Generously spread frosting over top and place second layer on top, again cut side down.  Top with more frosting.  Finish with top layer, domed side up if desired.  Frost the whole cake.  Top with remaining 2 tablespoons chopped pistachios.   

Jenny's Notes:

  • For an 8 - 9in / 20-23cm 3 layer cake, double this recipe.  

  • If your buttercream seems too thin or soupy after you've added the butter, stick it in the fridge for a few minutes, then rewhip.  Most likely it has not cooled down enough to stabilize.  

cake,layer cake,pistachio flour,pistachio,roux,cooked frosting,buttercream,honey vanilla
American
Yield: 8 servings
Author:

Pistachio Cake with Honey Vanilla Buttercream

3 layer moist pistachio cake with a light and fluffy cooked honey vanilla buttercream frosting.
prep time: 1 H & 25 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 1 H & 55 M

ingredients:

For the Pistachio Cake
  • 1/2 cup / 125g shelled pistachios
  • 1 1/4 cups / 164g cake flour
  • scant 1/2 cup / 47g all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp / 7g baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt
  • scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil
  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp / 7g vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup / 178g ice water
  • 1 egg white
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar
For the Honey Vanilla Buttercream
  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar
  • 3 Tbsp / 20g all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup / 178g milk
  • 3 Tbsp / 44g heavy whipping cream
  • 3/4 cup / 170g butter, cubed
  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract
  • 2 Tbsp / 42g honey

instructions:

How to cook Pistachio Cake with Honey Vanilla Buttercream

Make the Pistachio Cake
  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Grease and line the bottoms of 3 6-inch cake rounds with parchment paper.
  2. Place the pistachios in a food processor and pulse until coarsely chopped. Set aside 2 tablespoons. Continue to pulse remaining pistachios until finely ground, like flour in texture.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together pistachio flour, cake flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  4. In a normal bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, beat together oil, sugar, and vanilla. Add egg and beat until just combined.
  5. With the mixer on low, add the pistachio flour mixture to the batter in three additions, alternating with the ice water, beginning and ending with pistachio flour mixture. After each addition mix until just combined.
  6. In another medium bowl, beat the egg white with cream of tartar until soft peaks form, about 3-4 minutes. Gently fold the egg white into the cake batter, starting with just a spoonful to lighten the batter, then continue on with the rest.
  7. Pour batter into prepared cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Allow cakes to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then flip onto a wire rack to cool completely while you make the buttercream. Remove parchment paper from bottoms.
Make the Honey Vanilla Buttercream
  1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together sugar and flour. Add milk and cream and place over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mixture boils and thickens, about 5-10 minutes.
  2. Once thickened, pour mixture into a bowl of a stand mixer. Beat on high until cool, 8-10 minutes. Reduce speed to medium low and add butter, piece by piece, until fully incorporated. Increase speed and beat a few minutes, until light and fluffy. Beat in vanilla and honey.
Assembly
  1. Use a serrated knife to level off the top of the cakes. Cut off just as much as necessary to make the top of the cake level and flat. If you prefer domed cakes, leave one layer uncut for the top. Place one leveled layer on desired serving plate, cut side down. Generously spread frosting over top and place second layer on top, again cut side down. Top with more frosting. Finish with top layer, domed side up if desired. Frost the whole cake. Top with remaining 2 tablespoons chopped pistachios.

NOTES:

For an 8 - 9in / 20-23cm 3 layer cake, double this recipe. If your buttercream seems too thin or soupy after you've added the butter, stick it in the fridge for a few minutes, then rewhip. Most likely it has not cooled down enough to stabilize.

Calories

663.99

Fat (grams)

40.23

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.41

Carbs (grams)

70.29

Fiber (grams)

2.20

Net carbs

68.10

Sugar (grams)

43.45

Protein (grams)

8.20

Sodium (milligrams)

533.89

Cholesterol (grams)

77.11
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Buttermilk Bread

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when someone says, "Buttermilk"?  

For me, that would be buttermilk pancakes.  The lightest and fluffiest of all pancakes.  If you live in the south, maybe that's buttermilk biscuits.  Maybe your favorite cake recipe or scone recipe calls for buttermilk.  Whatever it may be, these delectable food items all have one thing in common:  Their light crumb, a.k.a. fluffiness.  The high acidity in the buttermilk reacts with the leavening agent, like baking soda, thus creating a beautiful rise, and a nice, light product.  

I don't often have buttermilk on hand; I find it much easier to make my own as I always have milk and lemon juice/vinegar on hand.  Lemon juice or vinegar are both very acidic and will have a similar effect on the leavening agent.  However, there is something so satisfying about using true buttermilk in a recipe.  After all, Milk and Lemon Juice Pancakes don't sound nearly as appealing as Buttermilk pancakes.   

So, a trip to the store, a carton of buttermilk bought, pancakes made and eaten.  Now, there is only 7/8 of a carton of buttermilk left in your fridge.  The likelihood of making 7 or more batches of buttermilk pancakes before the buttermilk goes bad is, well, not likely.  (But if you do, let me know, I’ll come live at your house!)  

The question remains, what I can do with the rest of this buttermilk without being wasteful?  Make buttermilk bread! (Another side note, if you like to drink buttermilk straight, well then.  You just can't relate with our buttermilk overload predicament, can you?)  The fluffiness factor we were talking about earlier still plays a role in this bread.  So fluffy.  Makes great toast.  And did I mention french toast?  Now you can serve buttermilk french toast! Oh yes.  Full circle, baby.  Actually, I don't really know where the circle started, so it's hard to tell if we actually came full circle...

On to the recipe! 

Recipe adapted from Jane's Sweets and Baking Journal


Buttermilk Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9x5 inch loaves

Ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620-740g all-purpose flour

  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast

  • 2 tsp / 10g salt

  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk

  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C.  Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.

  1. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt.  Mix together.  Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well.  Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.  

  2. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed.   This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand.  If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.

  3. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil.  Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.  

  4. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it.  Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.  

  5. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour.  Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action.  The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension.  If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth.  The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough.  This is called shaping a "Boule."  If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.  

  6. Repeat with other half of dough.  Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.

  7. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans.  Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour.  Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.  

  8. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam.  A spray bottle works well.  Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C.  Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.  

bread, white bread, carbs, buttermilk, toast, french toast bread
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Buttermilk Bread

A soft white bread made extra fluffy with the use of buttermilk. Great for toast and french toast.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 70 M

ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620g-740g all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast
  • 2 tsp / 10g salt
  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk
  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Buttermilk Bread

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.
  2. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt. Mix together. Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well. Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.
  3. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed. This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand. If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.
  4. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil. Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.
  5. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it. Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.
  6. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour. Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action. The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension. If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth. The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough. This is called shaping a "Boule." If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.
  7. Repeat with other half of dough. Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.
  8. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans. Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour. Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.
  9. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam. A spray bottle works well. Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C. Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.

Calories

161.19

Fat (grams)

2.00

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.28

Carbs (grams)

30.42

Fiber (grams)

1.12

Net carbs

29.30

Sugar (grams)

2.10

Protein (grams)

4.79

Sodium (milligrams)

239.83

Cholesterol (grams)

0.95
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from 20 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Whole Wheat Bread

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Simple, delicious, whole wheat bread.  No batons, bread machines, or rocket scientists required.  Actually, if you have a bread machine your bread making life is probably a lot simpler than mine.  I enjoy working the bread with my own hands, though.  It's very therapeutic and gives you a nice upper body workout.   Which means you could then eat more bread, yes?

Anyway, this is a simple, versatile bread, good for sandwiches, toast, and...bread.  

Recipe adapted from The Frugal Girl


Whole Wheat Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9in / 23cm loaves

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast

  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt

  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour

  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour

  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)

  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey

  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans. 

  1. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.  

  2. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil.  Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.  

  3. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.  

  4. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.  

  5. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it.  Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased.  Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.  

  6. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.  

  7. Separate dough into two equal pieces.  Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle.  It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches.  Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan.  Repeat with second piece.  

  8. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.  

  9. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes.  They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.  

  10. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan.

  • I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ.  Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile.  

  • The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.  I only eat pretty loaves.  ;)

vegan, dairy-free, whole wheat bread, wheat germ, honey, maple syrup, toast, french toast, whole wheat sandwich bread, homemade bread, loaves
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Whole Wheat Bread

Classic everyday whole wheat bread, great for sandwiches, toast, or anyway you like to eat bread!
prep time: 35 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 65 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast
  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt
  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour
  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)
  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey
  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Whole Wheat Bread

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans.
  2. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.
  3. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil. Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.
  4. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.
  5. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.
  6. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it. Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased. Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.
  7. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.
  8. Separate dough into two equal pieces. Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle. It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches. Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan. Repeat with second piece.
  9. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.
  10. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes. They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.
  11. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.

NOTES:

If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan. I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ. Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile. The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.

Calories

162.77

Fat (grams)

3.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.30

Carbs (grams)

29.38

Fiber (grams)

2.69

Net carbs

26.69

Sugar (grams)

2.54

Protein (grams)

4.53

Sodium (milligrams)

254.58

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from a 10-slice loaf.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

These little balls of energy are all about that pumpkin and spice and everything nice, and health and wealth with all of that schmealth.  Or something like that.  These will not make you rich.  Or give you schmealth.  I would never wish schmealth on anyone.  That sounds like some terrible disease.  Nor will these actually bite you.  You bite them.  Nom nom nom.

The great thing about these is that they whip up so quick.  In less than 15 minutes you can have delicious morsels easy to grab for a snack, pack for a quick lunch, or take on long car rides.  They're so easy to make you might spend more time assembling the ingredients, or mis en place, than making them!  And if I would stop rambling you probably could've had them already made...Scusami.

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

Makes about 20 Bites

Ingredients:

    •    1 cup oats
    •    1/4 cup ground flax seeds or wheat germ
    •    1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
    •    1/4 tsp cloves
    •    1/4 tsp ginger
    •    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    •    1/4 cup peanut butter
    •    1/4 cup pumpkin puree
    •    2 Tbsp maple syrup
    •    1 Tbsp honey
    •    1 tsp vanilla extract
    •    1/4 cup mini chocolate chips

Directions:

In a medium bowl combine all ingredients; mix well.

Roll mixture into approximately 1 inch balls.  Place in a container and store in the refrigerator, or freeze for snacking at a later date. 

Jenny's Notes:

With these types of recipes you do not have to be overly exact in your measurements.  If the dough seems too soft, simply add more oats or flax.  Too crumbly and you can add any number of things, honey, maple syrup, peanut butter...the choice is yours to personalize as you wish!

Now that didn't hurt, did it?  Happy snacking!

 

 

Caramel Sauce

Everyone should have a good caramel sauce on hand, in my mind it's an essential tool in the baker's repertoire.  It's easy to make and not too time consuming, the only special item you will need is a candy thermometer, and you can find those pretty cheaply.  Everyone will love you for making it.  Take it one step further to make salted caramel, and everyone and their brother will love you, too.  So get your thermometers ready, let's get cracking!  Actually, we will not be going to the soft-crack or hard-crack stages like on your thermometer, so calm down.  If we did, our caramel would not be soft and pour-able but capable of cracking your teeth.  

Caramel Sauce

Makes 2+ cups

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 Tbsp light corn syrup
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 tsp coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup cold, unsalted butter cut into tablespoons

Directions:

Combine sugar, corn syrup, and water in a medium sauce over high heat.  Allow to cook without stirring until the mixture turns a beautiful amber color.  (If it turns an ugly amber color, I can't help ya. Just kidding. Proceed.)  This could take anywhere from 10-20 minutes, depending on how hot your stove top cooks.  Keep a watchful eye on it, as it goes fast from light golden, perfectly amber, to burnt.  

Remove from heat and carefully pour in cream, a little at a time, as it will bubble up and spatter at you.  Stir until all the cream is mixed in. 

Attach a candy thermometer to the pan and return to the heat.  Cook until mixture reaches 238 degrees Fahrenheit, about 2-5 minutes. 

Remove from heat and stir in salt.  Stir in butter, one tablespoon at a time, until completely smooth.  Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely before using.  Store in the refrigerator. 

Jenny's Notes:

Don't like using corn syrup? Neither do I, in which case you can substitute honey for the corn syrup.  Keep in mind that it will give it a honey taste, so use discernment for which type of dessert you will be using it with and who you will be serving it to, if honey will suit or not. 

To make salted caramel, use salted butter and/or up the salt in the recipe to 1/2-1 tsp or to taste.

This is great in coffee, for cookies, swirling in brownies, using as a filling between cake layers, dipping apples and fruit into, on ice cream, and anything else you like to use caramel sauce for!  Get creative and may the streams of caramel forever be abundant in your life.   

Adapted from Martha Stewart

Peanut Butter Energy Bites

What is energy, and why do these bites have so much?  I'm not about to give you a lesson in physics, I'll leave that to Iggy Azalea, but basically they are filled with good calories (energy) from the nutrients and natural sugar.  If there is the word energy in the title, it probably just means it's high calorie.  But if they were called Peanut Butter Calorie Bites, who would make them?  Calories get such a bad rap, poor things.  Calories, I can't liiive without yooooou!  Literally. (If you just sang that to the tune of "Without You" by Badfinger, congratulations.  Me too.)  So if you need a boost of energy or a quick pick-me-up, these are your friends.  Also great if you are about to expend a lot of energy, like going for a run or playing Twister.  They are small but pack a punch, so they don't make you feel too full.  

Peanut Butter Energy Bites

Makes about 15 1-in. diameter balls

Ingredients:

A mass of energy...

A mass of energy...

  • 1 cup oats
  • 2/3 cup flaked or shredded coconut, unsweetened
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup wheat germ, chia seeds, or ground flax seed
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup mini chocolate chips

Directions:

In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients using a spoon or your hands.  If dough seems too dry, add more honey or peanut butter; if they seem too wet, add more oats or wheat germ. 

Form into balls and store in the fridge or freezer for when you want a quick snack.

Jenny's Notes:

For vegan bites, be sure to use diary free chips and replace honey with maple syrup.

For gluten-free bites, make sure your oats are certified gluten-free and use chia or flax seeds instead of wheat germ. 

Get creative with these bites, substitute or add to the chocolate chips with your favorite dried fruit or nuts, or even types of cereal, such as grape-nuts, puffed rice, granola, etc.

Adapted from Gimme Some Oven