Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

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Buon Ferragosto!

Also known as the day where everything is closed and I feel slightly trapped. Hmmm the gelato place is closed so I’ll just run to the store and pick up some…oh wait, all the grocery stores are closed. Ok, well maybe I’ll go browse some shops, oh wait, all closed. I’ll go walk around in the center for a bit…nope, hardly any buses running today to get to the center. Even if I could find a bus, all the places I could buy a ticket are closed. Ok, so I’ll walk to the gym to work out and enjoy some air conditioning. Ah, closed. So, I hunker down and eat whatever food is in the house, try to stay cool. Actually we’ve come to a bit of a cool spell, today only has a high of 90°F. I’ll take it!

I actually planned ahead this year and went grocery shopping last night. I got fruit and veggies for lunch and dinner today, but why didn’t I get better snackies? But then I remembered that I have a good stash of gelato in the freezer, and made me think of this delectable milkshake I made a few weeks ago.

So with all this time on my hands, I shall be milkshaking and sharing this milkshake with you! What’s so great about this milkshake?

It’s a Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake. That’s such a long name, and kinda going against my own rule of not listing every ingredient in the title, but otherwise I didn’t quite know how to get the dream across, ya know?

How about this: Strawnutelloco Milkshake. Stranucoco Milkshake. Conuterry. Strawconutella. Regardless, this milkshake tastes like a chocolate covered strawberry rolled in coconut with a hint of hazelnut.

I have a confession to make. I originally made this milkshake to try and hide this not-awesome gelato I bought. There was a sale on a brand I had never tried before at the grocery store, and they had coconut and I love coconut but it just did not end well. Icy and so much coconut it was chewy. I didn’t want to waste it, but I also didn’t necessarily want to force myself to eat gelato?

Enter the milkshake idea. I had strawberries, Nutella, and milk, and this beautiful combo was born. The copious amounts of coconut from the gelato still rendered my milkshake a bit chewy, but if you have a GOOD brand of coconut ice cream, or even vanilla ice cream with a bit of flaked coconut and maybe a drop of coconut extract or two thrown in, you’ve got yourself the perfect summer day’s treat.

So thank you, gelato brand that shall remain unnamed, for the not delicious gelato that prompted me to create a delicious milkshake.


Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

Serves 2

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Ingredients:

  • 2 cups coconut ice cream, slightly softened

  • 1/2 cup milk, any variety

  • 1/2 cup hulled strawberries, fresh or frozen

  • 2 heaping Tbsp Nutella

  • Dash of vanilla extract, optional

  • Whipped cream, optional

Directions:

  1. Add all ingredients except whipped cream to a blender and blend until smooth. Check consistency and add more milk if desired.

  2. Spoon into 2 glasses and top with whipped cream. Serve immediately.


Jenny’s Notes:

  • Don’t have coconut ice cream but still want that coconut taste? Substitute chocolate or vanilla ice cream and add a bit of flaked coconut and a drop or two of coconut extract.

  • For creamier shakes, use whole milk.

  • For thinner shakes you can sip, add more milk. For thicker, spoonable shakes, add less milk. Some blenders don’t blend thicker shakes well, so if yours is having problems, either wait a minute or two for the ice cream to soften a bit more before continuing to blend, or add a touch more milk.

  • To make fresh whipped cream, whip about 1/4 cup / 60g heavy whipping cream with 1 Tbsp / 14g sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, or with a handheld mixer. This makes about 1/2 cup fresh whipped cream. Store in fridge, best if used within a few days.

milkshake, milk, strawberry, Nutella, coconut, ice cream, vanilla, fresh whipped cream, dessert, summer
Dessert, Beverage
American
Yield: 2 Servings
Author:

Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

Thick and creamy milkshake with coconut ice cream, Nutella, strawberries and whipped cream on top.
prep time: 5 Mcook time: total time: 5 M

ingredients:

  • 2 cups coconut ice cream, slightly softened
  • 1/2 cup milk, any variety
  • 1/2 cup hulled strawberries, fresh or frozen
  • 2 heaping Tbsp Nutella
  • Dash of vanilla extract, optional
  • Whipped cream, optional

instructions:

How to cook Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

  1. Add all ingredients except whipped cream to a blender and blend until smooth. Check consistency and add more milk if desired.
  2. Spoon into 2 glasses and top with whipped cream. Serve immediately.

NOTES:

Don’t have coconut ice cream but still want that coconut taste? Substitute chocolate or vanilla ice cream and add a bit of flaked coconut and a drop or two of coconut extract. For creamier shakes, use whole milk. For thinner shakes you can sip, add more milk. For thicker, spoonable shakes, add less milk. Some blenders don’t blend thicker shakes well, so if yours is having problems, either wait a minute or two for the ice cream to soften a bit more before continuing to blend, or add a touch more milk. To make fresh whipped cream, whip about 1/4 cup / 60g heavy whipping cream with 1 Tbsp / 14g sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, or with a handheld mixer. This makes about 1/2 cup fresh whipped cream. Store in fridge, best if used within a few days.

Calories

440.85

Fat (grams)

23.21

Sat. Fat (grams)

19.31

Carbs (grams)

54.51

Fiber (grams)

3.87

Net carbs

50.64

Sugar (grams)

40.58

Protein (grams)

6.95

Sodium (milligrams)

49.23

Cholesterol (grams)

9.42
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 2 servings and includes whipped cream.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Spaghetti with Tuna - Spaghetti al Tonno

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Spaghetti with tuna; It’s like spaghetti, but instead of meatballs you add tuna to the tomato sauce!

Now, that might sound kinda weird at first to my American friends, just like Italians think we’re weird for putting meatballs on our spaghetti in the first place. But let me tell you. It’s really delicious and I find it strangely comforting. Italian comfort food.

If you haven’t noticed, July is pasta month here at Jennyblogs! What, you couldn’t tell from the 1 other pasta recipe I’ve posted so far this month that this whole month is going to be pasta? I’m so offended. (I’m just kidding you guyssss.) But now you know! So be sure to stay tuned (you can sign up for updates) for the rest of the month where I will share with you various recipes, some Italian, some American, and last week was Thai inspired! Everyone should have some quick and delicious pasta recipes in their repertoire that don’t need store-bought sauce! Homemade is always better, if you can manage it. That way you control exactly what goes into your and your loved ones bodies. No more excess sugar, preservatives, and high levels of salt and fat that can be hidden away in the store-bought jars of sauce.

Today, a recipe for Italian spaghetti al tonno, or spaghetti with tuna. Homemade sauce and all this can be on your table in less than 45 minutes!

Recipe by my husband, the pasta master


Spaghetti with Tuna - Spaghetti al Tonno

Serves 6-8

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Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. / 500g spaghetti

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil

  • 1/2 onion, chopped

  • 3 tomatoes, diced

  • 1 clove garlic, minced

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g tomato paste

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g ground turmeric

  • salt and pepper, to taste

  • 5 oz / 148g can of tuna, drained

Directions:

  1. Heat a large pot of water over high heat, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta al dente according to directions and drain.

  2. Meanwhile, while the pasta is cooking, heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium-low heat. Add the onion and cook until just fragrant and translucent, about 1-2 minutes.

  3. Add the tomatoes and simmer for about 10-15 minutes, or until they are pretty well broken down. If the sauce becomes too thick or starts to stick, add a bit of water.

  4. Add the garlic, tomato paste, turmeric, salt and pepper, and a small chunk of tuna*; simmer for another few minutes.

  5. Add the cooked pasta to the sauce, toss and stir to coat pasta. At this point you can either add the rest of the tuna and stir, or plate the pasta and add the tuna on top.

  6. Serve and eat!


Jenny’s Notes:

  • As with any pasta recipe, you don’t have to use spaghetti or the type called for. Use your favorite kind or whatever you think would go best with the sauce you’re making.

  • If you prefer a stronger tuna taste, you can use the liquid from the tuna can instead of water to keep the sauce from getting too thick while simmering. It doesn’t matter if it is packed in water or oil.

  • Add just a bit of tuna to flavor the sauce instead of the whole can because it doesn’t need to be cooked. The rest will be added in at the end.

  • In a pinch you can use a 15oz can of diced tomatoes instead of fresh.

Italian
Yield: 6-8 servings
Author:

Spaghetti with Tuna - Spaghetti al Tonno

A classic Italian pasta dish with spaghetti, homemade tomato sauce, and tuna.
prep time: 25 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 40 M

ingredients:

  • 1 lb. / 500g spaghetti
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 3 tomatoes, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g tomato paste
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g ground turmeric
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 5 oz / 148g can of tuna, drained

instructions:

How to cook Spaghetti with Tuna - Spaghetti al Tonno

  1. Heat a large pot of water over high heat, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta al dente according to directions and drain.
  2. Meanwhile, while the pasta is cooking, heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium-low heat. Add the onion and cook until just fragrant and translucent, about 1-2 minutes.
  3. Add the tomatoes and simmer for about 10-15 minutes, or until they are pretty well broken down. If the sauce becomes too thick or starts to stick, add a bit of water.
  4. Add the garlic, tomato paste, turmeric, salt and pepper, and a small chunk of tuna*; simmer for another few minutes.
  5. Add the cooked pasta to the sauce, toss and stir to coat pasta. At this point you can either add the rest of the tuna and stir, or plate the pasta and add the tuna on top.
  6. Serve and eat!

NOTES:

As with any pasta recipe, you don’t have to use spaghetti or the type called for. Use your favorite kind or whatever you think would go best with the sauce you’re making. If you prefer a stronger tuna taste, you can use the liquid from the tuna can instead of water to keep the sauce from getting too thick while simmering. It doesn’t matter if it is packed in water or oil. Add just a bit of tuna to flavor the sauce instead of the whole can because it doesn’t need to be cooked. The rest will be added in at the end. In a pinch you can use a 15oz can of diced tomatoes instead of fresh.

Calories

216.63

Fat (grams)

6.08

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.62

Carbs (grams)

29.31

Fiber (grams)

2.14

Net carbs

27.17

Sugar (grams)

3.19

Protein (grams)

11.05

Sodium (milligrams)

151.14

Cholesterol (grams)

10.36
Nutritional Information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Simple Thai Noodles

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This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Some nights you get caught unprepared and need something quick to whip up for dinner. Or maybe that’s every night? I know Sunday food prepping is all the rage, and it’s a really great idea…if you’re only feeding yourself or a small family, and not taking into account the unexpected that happens. Even if you’re the most organized person cooking just for yourself, those nights are going to spring up on you when you want something quick and easy, delicious, and you have all the ingredients on hand. This recipe for Simple Thai Noodles falls in that category.

Sesame oil might not be in everyone’s pantry, but if you invest in a bottle, it can last you months, depending on how often you make Asian or other dishes that often call for sesame oil. It really is worth it, if you try and substitute another oil it won’t be the same. It lends such a nutty depth to dishes!

I actually have several versions of lo mein, Thai noodles, fried rice, etc. and even a couple more waiting to be tried that all have in common varying quantities and varieties of green onion, sesame oil, soy sauce, ginger, peanuts or peanut butter, and a sweet and a spicy element. Each with their merits, and the occasions for which I like to make them. If you can’t tell, I love Asian dishes, whether they’re authentic or simply inspired by Asian flavors.

This pasta is kept in my repertoire for its simplicity while still retaining all the delicious flavors, and now you can make it too, whether you’re in a pinch for a quick dinner, or not! No one said you have to make it only when in a pinch. :)

Recipe adapted from A Small Snippet


Simple Thai Noodles

Serves 6-8

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Ingredients:

  • 16 oz / 500g linguine or spaghetti

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g olive oil, or oil of choice

  • 1/4 cup / 54g sesame oil

  • about 1 Tbsp / 5g red pepper flakes

  • 3 Tbsp / 63g honey

  • 3 Tbsp / 45g soy sauce

  • cilantro, chopped peanuts, chopped green onions, julienned carrots, sesame seeds, or your choice of toppings

Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta according to directions on box; drain, and return to pot.

  2. While the pasta is cooking, whisk together the oils, red pepper flakes, honey, and soy sauce in a small bowl.

  3. When the pasta is done and drained, add the sauce to the noodles and toss to coat well.

  4. Serve immediately, adding toppings of choice.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • You can adjust the amount of red pepper flakes to suit your spicy preference. 1 Tbsp, as in the recipe, results in reasonably spicy, but not overwhelming. Also, you could use a spicy oil if you have some on hand instead of the red pepper flakes.

  • For a stronger sesame taste, use all sesame oil instead of olive oil. (6 Tbsp / 84g total of sesame oil.)

  • Feel free to add veggies or a protein, if you desire. For veggies, chop small and sauté in a pan with a bit of oil for a few minutes or until tender, toss in when you add the sauce. Cook your protein and slice as desired, add at the end on top of plates of pasta or mix in with sauce.

  • I’ll be honest with you, this usually serves 4, max…

Thai
Yield: 6-8 servings
Author:

Simple Thai Noodles

The simplest Thai noodles for a quick and easy dinner using ingredients already in your pantry.
prep time: 10 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 25 M

ingredients:

  • 16 oz / 500g linguine or spaghetti
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g olive oil, or oil of choice
  • 1/4 cup / 54g sesame oil
  • about 1 Tbsp / 5g red pepper flakes
  • 3 Tbsp / 63g honey
  • 3 Tbsp / 45g soy sauce
  • cilantro, chopped peanuts, chopped green onions, julienned carrots, sesame seeds, or your choice of toppings

instructions:

How to cook Simple Thai Noodles

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil, adding salt just before it boils. Cook pasta according to directions on box; drain, and return to pot.
  2. While the pasta is cooking, whisk together the oils, red pepper flakes, honey, and soy sauce in a small bowl.
  3. When the pasta is done and drained, add the sauce to the noodles and toss to coat well.
  4. Serve immediately, adding toppings of choice.

NOTES:

You can adjust the amount of red pepper flakes to suit your spicy preference. 1 Tbsp, as in the recipe, results in reasonably spicy, but not overwhelming. Also, you could use a spicy oil if you have some on hand instead of the red pepper flakes. For a stronger sesame taste, use all sesame oil instead of olive oil. (6 Tbsp / 84g total of sesame oil.) Feel free to add veggies or a protein, if you desire. For veggies, chop small and sauté in a pan with a bit of oil for a few minutes or until tender, toss in when you add the sauce. Cook your protein and slice as desired, add at the end on top of plates of pasta or mix in with sauce. I’ll be honest with you, this usually serves 4, max…

Calories

294.66

Fat (grams)

14.65

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.10

Carbs (grams)

36.05

Fiber (grams)

2.12

Net carbs

33.93

Sugar (grams)

9.54

Protein (grams)

5.69

Sodium (milligrams)

418.72

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Calculated with green onion, carrots, and cilantro as toppings. Nutritional info is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Strawberry Shortcake

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Strawberry shortcake is a summer classic. All you need are juicy, ripe strawberries, shortcakes, which are really just biscuits with a bit of sugar added to them, and whipped cream. If you decided on adding some vanilla ice cream to the mix I don’t think anyone would be mad about it. I certainly wouldn’t be. Did I mention they’re really simple to make?

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It’s so simple because the strawberries are the shining star and don’t need much dressing up. If you try and make this when strawberries are out of season, even if you can find them in the grocery store, it just won’t be the same. This is a dessert that calls for strawberries ripened under the summer sun, bursting with flavor.

Do you want to know a secret? Strawberry shortcakes will reach the pinnacle of their goodness if you are able to pick the strawberries yourself! Not only will you be the one choosing the juiciest berries, but you’ll KNOW they’re as fresh as they come! Plus, you’ll taste the fruits of your own hard work and it makes it that much sweeter. Literally. I loved going strawberry picking with my mom as a kid. Strawberry season in Michigan is always in beginning to mid summer, usually end of June or early July, and we’d come home with baskets full. Then I’d help my mom hull and slice them, keeping some for eating, some for making strawberry shortcake and other desserts, and some for freezing and making jam.

Eat strawberry shortcake for dessert, or breakfast, snack, lunch, and dinner. I mean, biscuits and fruit sounds like a balanced and great way to start off the morning! Plus you’ll want to eat them as much as you can while the strawberry season lasts. A great thing about these is that you can add as little or as much sugar as you want! See notes at bottom of recipe for some ideas.

Recipe from my mama with tweaks from moi.


Strawberry Shortcake

Serves: 8-10

Ingredients:

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For the Macerated Strawberries

  • 4-5 cups strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced

  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste

For the Shortcakes

  • 2 cups / 240g all-purpose flour

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 4 tsp / 19g baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp / 2g salt

  • 1/2 cup / 113g cold butter or scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil

  • 2/3 cup / 158g cold milk or buttermilk

For the Whipped Cream

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste

  • 1 tsp / 4g vanilla extract

Directions:

Oven 450°F / 232°C. Have ready an ungreased baking sheet.

Make the Macerated Strawberries

  1. Place strawberries in a bowl, add sugar, and mash them a bit or a lot, as desired, with a fork or masher. Place in fridge while you prepare the shortcakes.

Make the Shortcakes

  1. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

  2. Cut in butter or oil until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

  3. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in milk. Mix just until most of the flour is moistened, then turn mixture out onto a floured surface.

  4. Knead lightly, up to 10-12 times, until you have a soft but not too sticky dough. Don’t overwork or biscuits will be tough.

  5. Gently pat dough out into a circle about 1in / 2.5cm thick, checking to make sure underneath is still floured well and the dough isn’t sticking.

  6. Using a biscuit cutter or a round glass 2-3in / 5-7cm in diameter, cut out as many biscuits as you can. Place biscuits on baking sheet. Collect the dough scraps and reshape into a ball. Repeat patting into a circle and slicing biscuits until dough is used up. You’ll probably only repeat the cutting process 2-3 times at most, depending on the size of your biscuit cutter.

  7. Bake biscuits in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until risen and lightly golden brown.

Make the Whipped Cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or with a hand mixer, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form.

  2. Add the sugar and vanilla and continue whipping until stiff peaks form.

Assembly

Slice your biscuits open and spoon over strawberries and whipped cream!

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The sugar mixed in with the strawberries is traditional but not absolutely necessary. Although it helps soften the strawberries to lose their juice and create more of a soft sauce, I like it also without adding any sugar, because everything else in this recipe is already a bit sweet. On the other hand, if you love sweet strawberry shortcakes, feel free to up the sugar, it’s completely up to your taste!

  • The biscuit dough might seem too soft at first, but the moment the baking powder starts working and it hits the floured surface it should become very workable. Just be careful not to over work it, a little bit goes a long way.

  • When cutting the biscuits, cut straight down, no twisting, or this can seal the edges and prevent a good rise. You can dip the biscuit cutter in some flour to help prevent any sticking.

  • If you place the biscuits next to each other on the baking sheet they can help each other “climb” up and achieve a nicer rise! I know this feels counterintuitive, but give it a try!

American
Yield: 8-10 servings
Author:

Strawberry Shortcake

Classic strawberry shortcake recipe handed down from my mama. Homemade biscuits, juicy strawberries, and fresh whipped cream assembled together in a summery dessert.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 52 M

ingredients:

For the Macerated Strawberries
  • 4-5 cups strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced
  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste
For the Shortcakes
  • 2 cups / 240g all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 4 tsp / 19g baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp / 2g salt
  • 1/2 cup / 113g cold butter or scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil
  • 2/3 cup / 158g cold milk or buttermilk
For the Whipped Cream
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste
  • 1 tsp / 4g vanilla extract

instructions:

How to cook Strawberry Shortcake

Make the Macerated Strawberries
  1. Place strawberries in a bowl, add sugar, and mash them a bit or a lot, as desired, with a fork or masher. Place in fridge while you prepare the shortcakes.
Make the Shortcakes
  1. Preheat oven to 450F / 232C. Have ready an ungreased baking sheet.
  2. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Cut in butter or oil until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in milk. Mix just until most of the flour is moistened, then turn mixture out onto a floured surface.
  5. Knead lightly, up to 10-12 times, until you have a soft but not too sticky dough. Don’t overwork or biscuits will be tough.
  6. Gently pat dough out into a circle about 1in / 2.5cm thick, checking to make sure underneath is still floured well and the dough isn’t sticking.
  7. Using a biscuit cutter or a round glass 2-3in / 5-7cm in diameter, cut out as many biscuits as you can. Place biscuits on baking sheet. Collect the dough scraps and reshape into a ball. Repeat patting into a circle and slicing biscuits until dough is used up. You’ll probably only repeat the cutting process 2-3 times at most, depending on the size of your biscuit cutter.
  8. Bake biscuits in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until risen and lightly golden brown.
Make the Whipped Cream
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or with a hand mixer, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form.
  2. Add the sugar and vanilla and continue whipping until stiff peaks form.
Assembly
  1. Slice your biscuits open and spoon over strawberries and whipped cream!

NOTES:

The sugar mixed in with the strawberries is traditional but not absolutely necessary. Although it helps soften the strawberries to lose their juice and create more of a soft sauce, I like it also without adding any sugar, because everything else in this recipe is already a bit sweet. On the other hand, if you love sweet strawberry shortcakes, feel free to up the sugar, it’s completely up to your taste! The biscuit dough might seem too soft at first, but the moment the baking powder starts working and it hits the floured surface it should become very workable. Just be careful not to over work it, a little bit goes a long way. When cutting the biscuits, cut straight down, no twisting, or this can seal the edges and prevent a good rise. You can dip the biscuit cutter in some flour to help prevent any sticking. If you place the biscuits next to each other on the baking sheet they can help each other “climb” up and achieve a nicer rise! I know this feels counterintuitive, but give it a try!

Calories

436.99

Fat (grams)

24.15

Sat. Fat (grams)

7.94

Carbs (grams)

51.65

Fiber (grams)

2.77

Net carbs

48.88

Sugar (grams)

24.49

Protein (grams)

5.28

Sodium (milligrams)

368.72

Cholesterol (grams)

35.06
Nutritional Information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Classic Rhubarb Custard Pie

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This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Nothings says summer like a rhubarb pie. Better yet, a rhubarb CUSTARD pie.

Rhubarb is always one of the first garden plants to grow each spring in Michigan, announcing that after a long, cold winter summer is indeed coming and didn’t get lost along the way after all. Rhubarb likes to grow so extensively in its short season that you don’t know what to do with all of it, until it withers in the approach of hotter weather and leaves you already looking forward to next year’s crop. Unless, of course, you planned ahead and froze some. But frozen rhubarb will never be like fresh, so make all the pie and hand pie, crisp, cake, syrup, and camel hair soup you can! I mean, er, rhubarb sauce…not camel hair soup. Hehe, who’d call it that??

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Do you want to know something really sad? I’ve never seen rhubarb in Italy, at least not in Florence. So for my international friends, I’m sorry if your area fails you and doesn’t grow rhubarb so you aren’t able to make this recipe. If there is rhubarb in Florence though, someone please tell me where to find it? So far everyone I’ve asked just said, “…what’s that?” This just goes to show my ignorance. Before moving to Italy I was trying to bake with all of the ingredients that aren’t readily available here, or at least what I figured wouldn’t be readily available. I should have been in a baking frenzy with rhubarb instead of things like Oreos. Because, no rhubarb and Oreos everywhere. There are even Oreo donuts in the grocery store bakery section…I’ve come so close to trying them during various weak moments.

Wherever you are in the world, be sure to bake or eat a rhubarb pie at the next chance. You won’t regret it and might inspire you to move to a part of the world where rhubarb is grown.

This recipe is the old-fashioned classic from my mama. The crust is one of my favorite traditional pie crust recipes, simple and can be made ahead of time if needed. It uses butter instead of shortening, which in my mind is a bit of a compromise between shortening or lard (which most people and bakeries use to make tender and flaky crusts but it’s also horrendous for your health and has no taste if it’s not artificially flavored.) and oil, which my mom has always used because oil can actually be good for you, although it makes for the trickiest to handle and often um, hardier pie crusts. So I use butter, which tastes wonderful and makes the crust easy enough to work with, even if it’s not as healthy as oil.


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Classic Rhubarb Custard Pie

Makes one 9in / 23cm pie, about 8 servings

Ingredients:

For the Crust

  • 2 2/3 cup / 320g all-purpose flour

  • 1 tsp salt

  • 8 Tbsp / 113g butter, cold

  • 1/2 -3/4 cup / 118 - 178g ice water

For the Rhubarb Custard Filling

  • 3 eggs

  • 3 Tbsp / 45g milk

  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g granulated sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour

  • 3/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 4 cups fresh rhubarb, sliced into 1/2in / 1cm chunks

Directions:

Oven 400F / 205C. 8 or 9 inch pie dish. 

Make the Crust

IMG_4560.jpg
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt.  Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands.  You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas. 

  2. Add the ice water, starting with 1/2 cup / 118g, working with the dough as little as possible.  The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet and sticky.  Add more water if necessary, one Tbsp at a time.  

  3. Separate the dough into two halves, weighing for accuracy. Place each half on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly.  Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.  

  4. After the dough has rested, take one half out of the fridge and roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat.  Make a few rolls with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45 degrees (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls.  Periodically check under your crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkle more flour if it does. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie plate.  

  5. Carefully transfer crust to the pie dish (this is easier using a silpat), trim the excess overhang where necessary, and fold the ends under to create a clean edge. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork.  Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork.  Place in fridge while you prepare the other crust and pie filling.  

  6. Repeat with second half of dough, rolling and turning until you achieve a circle a bit larger than the pie dish. For a classic top pie crust, transfer the rolled crust to the fridge while you prepare the filling. For a lattice top, transfer crust to a cutting board so you don’t ruin your counter or silpat and slice into 1/2in / 1cm strips or desired width. Transfer to fridge while you prepare the filling.

Make the Rhubarb Custard Filling

  1. Blend eggs and milk together in a large bowl.

  2. Add the flour and nutmeg to the sugar then add to the egg mixture and beat well.

  3. Add in the rhubarb and mix to coat well.

  4. Pour into prepared pie crust and add top crust.

    For a classic top pie crust, place crust on top, cut off overhang, and crimp together the edges of the top and bottom crust to seal.

    For the interwoven lattice, you are going to start in the center of the pie and work outward, then repeat with the other half. Arrange half of the strips evenly spaced over the pie all in one direction, then flip every other strip back over itself, so half are now only covering half of the pie. Take a new strip and place it perpendicularly just in front of the folded strips. Unfold the folded strips so these ones now cover the new strip. The new strip should be under and over every other one. Working on that same half of the pie, fold back every other strip, all the ones that were NOT just folded. Take another strip and place it evenly apart from the first perpendicular strip. Unfold the folded strips. You should now start to see and understand the pattern; repeat folding back, placing strip, and unfolding until you reach the edge of the pie. You may need to trim down the strips as you get closer to the edge. Repeat with other half of the pie.

  5. Sprinkle sugar on top, if desired.

  6. Bake pie in preheated oven for 50-60 minutes or until crust is golden brown and a knife inserted in center of pie confirms that the rhubarb is tender.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • If you make the crust and pie in the same day, you could make the filling while the crust is resting in the fridge for an hour or so before rolling out.

  • You can also use your favorite pie crust recipe, of course!

  • Instead of a traditional top pie crust or lattice you could add a streusel/crumble, delicious and definitely the easiest option of the three.

American
Yield: 8
Author:

Rhubarb Custard Pie

Classic rhubarb custard pie recipe handed down from my mama. Homemade pie crust with the uniquely sweet and sour filling you can only get with rhubarb.
prep time: 1 H & 10 Mcook time: 1 hourtotal time: 2 H & 10 M

ingredients:

For the Crust
  • 2 2/3 cup / 320g all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 8 Tbsp / 113g butter, cold
  • 1/2 -3/4 cup / 118 - 178g ice water
For the Rhubarb Custard Filling
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 Tbsp / 45g milk
  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 4 cups fresh rhubarb, sliced into 1/2in / 1cm chunks

instructions:

How to cook Rhubarb Custard Pie

Make the Crust
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt. Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands. You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas.
  2. Add the ice water, starting with 1/2 cup / 118g, working with the dough as little as possible. The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet and sticky. Add more water if necessary, one Tbsp at a time.
  3. Separate the dough into two halves, weighing for accuracy. Place each half on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly. Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.
  4. After the dough has rested, take one half out of the fridge and roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat. Make a few rolls with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45 degrees (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls. Periodically check under your crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkle more flour if it does. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie plate.
  5. Carefully transfer crust to the pie dish (this is easier using a silpat), trim the excess overhang where necessary, and fold the ends under to create a clean edge. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork. Place in fridge while you prepare the other crust and pie filling.
  6. Repeat with second half of dough, rolling and turning until you achieve a circle a bit larger than the pie dish. For a classic top pie crust, transfer the rolled crust to the fridge while you prepare the filling. For a lattice top, transfer crust to a cutting board so you don’t ruin your counter or silpat and slice into 1/2in / 1cm strips or desired width. Transfer to fridge while you prepare the filling.
Make the Rhubarb Custard Filling
  1. Oven 400F / 205C.  8 or 9 inch pie dish.
  2. Blend eggs and milk together in a large bowl.
  3. Add the flour and nutmeg to the sugar then add to the egg mixture and beat well.
  4. Add in the rhubarb and mix to coat well.
  5. Pour into prepared pie crust and add top crust.
  6. For a classic top pie crust, place crust on top, cut off overhang, and crimp together the edges of the top and bottom crust to seal.
  7. For the interwoven lattice, you are going to start in the center of the pie and work outward, then repeat with the other half. Arrange half of the strips evenly spaced over the pie all in one direction, then flip every other strip back over itself, so half are now only covering half of the pie. Take a new strip and place it perpendicularly just in front of the folded strips. Unfold the folded strips so these ones now cover the new strip. The new strip should be under and over every other one. Working on that same half of the pie, fold back every other strip, all the ones that were NOT just folded. Take another strip and place it evenly apart from the first perpendicular strip. Unfold the folded strips. You should now start to see and understand the pattern; repeat folding back, placing strip, and unfolding until you reach the edge of the pie. You may need to trim down the strips as you get closer to the edge. Repeat with other half of the pie.
  8. Sprinkle sugar on top, if desired.
  9. Bake pie in preheated oven for 50-60 minutes or until crust is golden brown and a knife inserted in center of pie confirms that the rhubarb is tender.

NOTES:

If you make the crust and pie in the same day, you could make the filling while the crust is resting in the fridge for an hour or so before rolling out. You can also use your favorite pie crust recipe, of course! Instead of a traditional top pie crust or lattice you could add a streusel/crumble, delicious and definitely the easiest option of the three.

Calories

431.35

Fat (grams)

12.79

Sat. Fat (grams)

7.67

Carbs (grams)

74.08

Fiber (grams)

2.32

Net carbs

71.76

Sugar (grams)

38.25

Protein (grams)

6.18

Sodium (milligrams)

397.03

Cholesterol (grams)

54.07
Nutritional Information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Overnight Bagels

IMG_2103.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Bagels. Who doesn’t love them? Especially toasted with cream cheese or butter melting on top. Everyone has their favorite bagel, where to get them and how to eat them, whether that’s the chewy and dense boiled variety or the slightly lighter and more modern steamed versions, plain or everything, toasted with cream cheese, eaten plain, or eaten as a sandwich.

One of my favorite bagel memories is from New York City where I spent two summers training with the American Ballet Theatre when I was a teenager. On the weekends my mom and I would go on adventures exploring the city, usually walking an average of 15 miles a day and thus needing sustenance. I remember particularly well one morning passing a bagel shop and a few minutes later exiting with a freshly toasted bagel smothered in cream cheese and wrapped in tinfoil. So simple, so inexpensive, and I still think of that bagel as one of the best I’ve ever had. So I guess you could say I’m a NYC bagel girl, but to be fair, I don’t think I’ve had any (at least not-from-a-hotel-breakfast-bar bagels) in any of the major cities famed for bagels, such as Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston, or Los Angeles. And I’ve been to all those cities! Too bad I didn’t know they had amazing bagels or I would’ve done a trial and comparison. Ah well, just have to go back I guess!

I am blogging this bagel recipe which involves an overnight ferment and boiling, because I think IT’S SO YUMMY. I’m not going to tout this recipe as the bagel recipe to end all bagel recipes, because frankly, I’m not into that kind of marketing and I believe there are other valid methods and types of bagel recipes out there. This recipe comes from Peter Reinhart’s book The Breadmaker’s Apprentice, and as he says, this is a bagel for the ages. And he knows what he’s talking about, so you should try this recipe. You can buy the cookbook by clinking on the link to the right!

I am blogging this bagel recipe which involves an overnight ferment and boiling, because I think IT’S SO YUMMY. I’m not going to tout this recipe as the bagel recipe to end all bagel recipes, because frankly, I’m not into that kind of marketing and I believe there are other valid methods and types of bagel recipes out there. This recipe comes from Peter Reinhart’s book The Breadmaker’s Apprentice, and as he says, this is a bagel for the ages. And he knows what he’s talking about, so you should try this recipe. You can buy the cookbook by clinking on the link to the right!

Don’t let the overnight ferment or multi-step process scare you, it’s really quite fun and not nearly as tricky as I had always imagined making bagels to be. You will need to clear some space in your fridge and in your schedule, but if I can do it in my tiny Italian kitchen with my tiny toaster-sized oven, so can you, wherever you are baking! I recommend reading the recipe through once or twice before making a game plan. (As you should with every recipe!)

What follows is a slightly modified version of Peter Reinhart’s recipe. The ingredients are basically identical but the instructions I have rewritten in my own words and in places slightly changed or modified to accommodate tips and tricks that worked really well for me and might work for you, too!


Overnight Bagels

Makes 12 big or 24 small bagels

Ingredients:

For the Sponge

  • 1 tsp / 3g instant yeast

  • 4 cups / 510g bread flour

  • 2 1/2 cups / 567g water

For the Dough

  • 1/2 tsp / 1.5g instant yeast

  • 3 3/4 cups / 482g bread flour

  • 2 3/4 tsp / 20g salt

  • 2 tsp / 9.5g malt powder OR flavoring of choice: 1 Tbsp / 14g dark or light malt syrup, honey, or dark or light brown sugar

For Boiling the Bagels

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g baking soda, optional, or malt syrup or honey

  • a large pot of water, the wider the pot the better

  • cornmeal or semolina, for dusting

Toppings, any or all of the following

  • sesame seeds

  • poppy seeds

  • salt flakes

  • rehydrated minced garlic

  • rehydrated minced onion

Directions:

DAY 1

Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper and grease well.

Make the Sponge

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or large bowl, stir the yeast into the flour. Add the water and stir just until a sticky dough has formed, similar to pancake batter.

  2. Cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for about 2 hours, or until it becomes very bubbly and active. It should be about twice the size and collapse when the bowl is tapped on the countertop.

Make the Dough

  1. Once the sponge is ready, add the next measurement of yeast and mix on low speed with the dough hook or by hand with a spoon. Next, add 3 cups / 383g of the next measurement of flour, the salt, and malt powder / flavoring of choice. Stir on low speed for about 3 minutes, or with a spoon until you have a mostly homogeneous ball. Slowly add the remaining 3/4 cup / 99g flour to stiffen the dough a bit.

  2. Knead the dough on medium-low speed for about 6 minutes or turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for about 10 minutes. The dough should be smooth and firm yet pliable, not sticky, with all flour worked in. If it seems too dry or there is excess flour throughout, add a few drops of water until you reach the desired consistency. Likewise if it’s too sticky, add in a bit of flour until you reach the correct stiffness. At this point the dough should pass the windowpane test. (Stretch a small piece of dough between your thumbs and forefingers; if enough gluten has developed through kneading the dough should stretch thin where you can see light coming through. If it breaks before you can stretch it thin, knead another few minutes and try again. See photo.)

Weigh and Shape the Dough

IMG_2100.jpg
  1. Weigh your dough ball and divide the weight by the number of bagels you wish to make: If you’re making mini bagels, divide the weight by 24, or if you’re making regular bagels, divide the weight by 12. This will give you the goal weight for each dough ball you are about to make. For example, the weight of my dough ball the last time I made these bagels was 1,566g. 1,566g divided by 12 for regular bagels = about 130g each. Or, 1,566g divided by 24 for mini bagels = about 65g each.

  2. Once you have your goal weight for the dough balls, divide the dough ball in half, then keep dividing the halves and quarters until you have 12 or 24 dough chunks. Weigh each chunk and add or subtract a bit of dough until they are all within about 5g of the goal weight. Roll each dough chunk under your palm with a cupped hand in a circular motion, guiding with the outer edge of your palm, until you have a nice ball. It works best to roll them on a surface with little to no flour. This way the dough sticks slightly to the surface as you move in a circular motion and pulls and creates surface tension.

  3. Place the dough balls on a lightly floured surface and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rest for approximately 20 minutes.

  4. Shape each dough ball into bagel form by poking your thumb through the center of the ball and rotating your thumb around the inside of the hole or lassoing it a few times around your thumb, until the hole is about 2 1/2 in / 6 cm for regular bagels or 1 1/2 in / 4 cm for mini. Aim to stretch the bagel as evenly as possible, avoiding a thick and thin side so you won’t end up with lopsided bagels. Alternately, you can roll the doll ball into an 8 in / 20 cm long rope, wrap it around your knuckles with the seam on the under side, then rock the seam on the counter until sealed.

  5. Place the shaped bagels onto the greased baking sheets about 2 inches apart. Mist with spray oil or rub on oil, then slip each sheet into a clean, food-grade plastic bag or cover with plastic wrap.

  6. Place bagels in the fridge to rise overnight. They are best if used the next day, but can be kept up to three days in the fridge.

DAY 2

Boil the Bagels

  1. Test to see if the bagels are ready to be boiled by removing one carefully from the fridge and placing in a bowl of cool or tepid water. If the bagel floats within 10 seconds, it’s ready. Immediately return the bagel to the covered baking sheet in the fridge while you ready the water.

    If the bagel does not float within 10 seconds, either return it to the fridge and repeat the float test every couple hours until the bagels are ready, or remove both sheets of bagels from the fridge and let raise at room temperature, repeating the float test every 10 to 20 minutes until a bagel passes. Return them to the fridge once they are ready so they don’t over-rise. The stiffness of the dough, your house temperature, and your fridge temperature will all impact when the bagels are ready to be boiled.

    If your bagels have over-risen (you can tell if they collapse when you gently handle them or if they overly deflate when boiled) or they have stuck to the pan, transfer them as carefully as you can to another better-oiled parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise at room temperature for another 15-20 minutes or until they pass the float test again. Return them to the fridge once they are ready.

  2. When the bagels are just about ready, place the large pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil, then add baking soda, if using. Have a skimmer or slotted spoon ready nearby. Preheat the oven to 500F / 260C and place two racks in the middle of the oven.

  3. Remove one sheet of bagels from the fridge and gently slide 3-4 into the boiling water, or however many can fit comfortably side to side. Boil for 30 seconds to 1 minute on one side, then flip each bagel and boil for another 30 seconds to 1 minute. Bagels boiled for 1 minute on each side will be chewier than those boiled for only 30 seconds on each side.

    While the bagels are boiling, sprinkle the same parchment lined baking sheet with cornmeal or semolina.

  4. When it’s time to remove the bagels, use the slotted spoon and place them back on the baking sheet now sprinkled with cornmeal. Add toppings immediately while the bagels are still wet, if you choose to use toppings. Repeat with the second sheet of bagels.

Bake the Bagels

  1. Place both baking sheets of bagels in the preheated oven. Bake for 7 minutes, then switch the pans on the racks and rotate each 180 degrees to bake the bagels as evenly as possible.

    After you switch and rotate, lower the oven temperature to 450F / 232C and bake for another 7-8 minutes, or until light golden brown.

  2. Remove from the oven and allow bagels to cool for 15 minutes before devouring.


Jenny’s Notes:

  • To keep my scale clean while weighing the dough I place the now-empty bowl (don’t have to clean it, the dough was just in there) and press tare. You can also use a piece of plastic film wrap over the scale and tare if needed.

  • I like to make 6 regular bagels and 12 mini for variety. You can do this by weighing your dough ball and then dividing it in half. Weigh one half and divide this number by 6; then weigh the other half and divide by 12.

  • I love lassoing the bagels while shaping them! Fast, fun, and effective. Not as big a fan of the rope and seal version, I thought it took longer and the finishing ring was not as symmetrical. Try out both versions to find which works best for you!

  • I found it best to make the dough in the evening and boil and bake the bagels in the morning or they over-rose, but I believe this is mostly due to my not-cold-enough fridge. If you have a cold and well functioning fridge, you should be fine to make and bake the bagels at your leisure!

  • When baking the bagels, know your oven. If you have hot spots or a small oven, you can choose to bake one sheet of bagels at a time. Since my oven is small, I baked the first sheet of bagels while I was boiling the second sheet, and simply rotated the pan 180 degrees after the first 7 minutes.

Jewish-American
Yield: 12-24
Author:

Overnight Bagels

A recipe from Peter Reinhart's "The Breadmaker's Apprentice." The bagels get an overnight ferment leading to increased umami flavor and are boiled for optimal chewiness.
prep time: 1 H & 45 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 1 H & 60 M

ingredients:

For the Sponge
  • 1 tsp / 3g instant yeast
  • 4 cups / 510g bread flour
  • 2 1/2 cups / 567g water
For the Dough
  • 1/2 tsp / 1.5g instant yeast
  • 3 3/4 cups / 482g bread flour
  • 2 3/4 tsp / 20g salt
  • 2 tsp / 9.5g malt powder OR flavoring of choice: 1 Tbsp / 14g dark or light malt syrup, honey, or dark or light brown sugar
For Boiling the Bagels
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g baking soda, optional, or malt syrup or honey
  • a large pot of water, the wider the pot the better
  • cornmeal or semolina, for dusting
Toppings, any or all of the following
  • sesame seeds
  • poppy seeds
  • salt flakes
  • rehydrated minced garlic
  • rehydrated minced onion

instructions:

How to cook Overnight Bagels

DAY 1 Make the Sponge
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or large bowl, stir the yeast into the flour. Add the water and stir just until a sticky dough has formed, similar to pancake batter.
  2. Cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for about 2 hours, or until it becomes very bubbly and active. It should be about twice the size and collapse when the bowl is tapped on the countertop.
Make the Dough
  1. Once the sponge is ready, add the next measurement of yeast and mix on low speed with the dough hook or by hand with a spoon. Next, add 3 cups / 383g of the next measurement of flour, the salt, and malt powder / flavoring of choice. Stir on low speed for about 3 minutes, or with a spoon until you have a mostly homogeneous ball. Slowly add the remaining 3/4 cup / 99g flour to stiffen the dough a bit.
  2. Knead the dough on medium-low speed for about 6 minutes or turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for about 10 minutes. The dough should be smooth and firm yet pliable, not sticky, with all flour worked in. If it seems too dry or there is excess flour throughout, add a few drops of water until you reach the desired consistency. Likewise if it’s too sticky, add in a bit of flour until you reach the correct stiffness. At this point the dough should pass the windowpane test. (Stretch a small piece of dough between your thumbs and forefingers; if enough gluten has developed through kneading the dough should stretch thin where you can see light coming through. If it breaks before you can stretch it thin, knead another few minutes and try again.)
Weigh and Shape the Dough
  1. Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper and grease well.
  2. Weigh your dough ball and divide the weight by the number of bagels you wish to make: If you’re making mini bagels, divide the weight by 24, or if you’re making regular bagels, divide the weight by 12. This will give you the goal weight for each dough ball you are about to make. For example, the weight of my dough ball the last time I made these bagels was 1,566g. 1,566g divided by 12 for regular bagels = about 130g each. Or, 1,566g divided by 24 for mini bagels = about 65g each.
  3. Once you have your goal weight for the dough balls, divide the dough ball in half, then keep dividing the halves and quarters until you have 12 or 24 dough chunks. Weigh each chunk and add or subtract a bit of dough until they are all within about 5g of the goal weight. Roll each dough chunk under your palm with a cupped hand in a circular motion, guiding with the outer edge of your palm, until you have a nice ball. It works best to roll them on a surface with little to no flour. This way the dough sticks slightly to the surface as you move in a circular motion and pulls and creates surface tension.
  4. Place the dough balls on a lightly floured surface and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rest for approximately 20 minutes.
  5. Shape each dough ball into bagel form by poking your thumb through the center of the ball and rotating your thumb around the inside of the hole or lassoing it a few times around your thumb, until the hole is about 2 1/2 in / 6 cm for regular bagels or 1 1/2 in / 4 cm for mini. Aim to stretch the bagel as evenly as possible, avoiding a thick and thin side so you won’t end up with lopsided bagels. Alternately, you can roll the doll ball into an 8 in / 20 cm long rope, wrap it around your knuckles with the seam on the under side, then rock the seam on the counter until sealed.
  6. Place the shaped bagels onto the greased baking sheets about 2 inches apart. Mist with spray oil or rub on oil, then slip each sheet into a clean, food-grade plastic bag or cover with plastic wrap.
  7. Place bagels in the fridge to rise overnight. They are best if used the next day, but can be kept up to three days in the fridge.
DAY 2 Boil the Bagels
  1. Test to see if the bagels are ready to be boiled by removing one carefully from the fridge and placing in a bowl of cool or tepid water. If the bagel floats within 10 seconds, it’s ready. Immediately return the bagel to the covered baking sheet in the fridge while you ready the water.
  2. If the bagel does not float within 10 seconds, either return it to the fridge and repeat the float test every couple hours until the bagels are ready, or remove both sheets of bagels from the fridge and let raise at room temperature, repeating the float test every 10 to 20 minutes until a bagel passes. Return them to the fridge once they are ready so they don’t over-rise. The stiffness of the dough, your house temperature, and your fridge temperature will all impact when the bagels are ready to be boiled.
  3. If your bagels have over-risen (you can tell if they collapse when you gently handle them or if they overly deflate when boiled) or they have stuck to the pan, transfer them as carefully as you can to another better-oiled parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise at room temperature for another 15-20 minutes or until they pass the float test again. Return them to the fridge once they are ready.
  4. When the bagels are just about ready, place the large pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil, then add baking soda, if using. Have a skimmer or slotted spoon ready nearby. Preheat the oven to 500F / 260C and place two racks in the middle of the oven.
  5. Remove one sheet of bagels from the fridge and gently slide 3-4 into the boiling water, or however many can fit comfortably side to side. Boil for 30 seconds to 1 minute on one side, then flip each bagel and boil for another 30 seconds to 1 minute. Bagels boiled for 1 minute on each side will be chewier than those boiled for only 30 seconds on each side.
  6. While the bagels are boiling, sprinkle the same parchment lined baking sheet with cornmeal or semolina.
  7. When it’s time to remove the bagels, use the slotted spoon and place them back on the baking sheet now sprinkled with cornmeal. Add toppings immediately while the bagels are still wet, if you choose to use toppings. Repeat with the second sheet of bagels.
Bake the Bagels
  1. Place both baking sheets of bagels in the preheated oven. Bake for 7 minutes, then switch the pans on the racks and rotate each 180 degrees to bake the bagels as evenly as possible.
  2. After you switch and rotate, lower the oven temperature to 450F / 232C and bake for another 7-8 minutes, or until light golden brown.
  3. Remove from the oven and allow bagels to cool for 15 minutes before devouring.

NOTES:

To keep my scale clean while weighing the dough I place the now-empty bowl (don’t have to clean it, the dough was just in there) and press tare. You can also use a piece of plastic film wrap over the scale and tare if needed. I like to make 6 regular bagels and 12 mini for variety. You can do this by weighing your dough ball and then dividing it in half. Weigh one half and divide this number by 6; then weigh the other half and divide by 12. I love lassoing the bagels while shaping them! Fast, fun, and effective. Not as big a fan of the rope and seal version, I thought it took longer and the finishing ring was not as symmetrical. Try out both versions to find which works best for you! I found it best to make the dough in the evening and boil and bake the bagels in the morning or they over-rose, but I believe this is mostly due to my not-cold-enough fridge. If you have a cold and well functioning fridge, you should be fine to make and bake the bagels at your leisure! When baking the bagels, know your oven. If you have hot spots or a small oven, you can choose to bake one sheet of bagels at a time. Since my oven is small, I baked the first sheet of bagels while I was boiling the second sheet, and simply rotated the pan 180 degrees after the first 7 minutes.

Calories

303.74

Fat (grams)

1.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.22

Carbs (grams)

60.82

Fiber (grams)

2.14

Net carbs

58.68

Sugar (grams)

0.83

Protein (grams)

10.16

Sodium (milligrams)

1017.73

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional Info is Approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator



Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

2019-05-26+17.58.07-2.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

After more than two years in Italy, I have finally made a cheesecake.

Proof that you don’t need a springform pan to bake a cheesecake

Proof that you don’t need a springform pan to bake a cheesecake

Cheesecakes are not hard to make, but the baking is important, probably the most important part, and has always been tricky for me. Cheesecakes are usually baked at a slightly lower temperature, usually around 325F, and just until the sides are set but the center is still jiggly. If the center sets, the cheesecake is over done, but if the center is too jiggly, then your cheesecake won’t set up in the fridge and you’ll end up with soup when you cut into it. You don’t want the cheesecake to crack, and some recipes will tell you to add a bain-marie (a hot water bath) to the oven to keep the atmosphere humid or to crack the oven door after you’ve turned it off so your cheesecake won’t cool down too quickly and yes, crack.

So when you live in Italy with strange ovens, you think twice before baking things when you can’t perfectly control the heat in your oven or where the heat is coming from. IF you’re able to tell the temperature of your oven at all. (I’m thinking of you, my oven two apartments ago. I DO NOT miss you!) Or if your oven is small and cooks things a lot quicker. Add on top of that the cream cheese here, “formaggio fresco” or literally translated fresh cheese, is…different. I’m not even sure what it is, it tastes similar to cream cheese in the States, but when you whip it it doesn’t become soupy like the American stuff, it becomes super creamy. Sometimes I think the American stuff is stickier too, maybe? The only brand here I’ve ever seen is Philadelphia, and it has had great success in Italy. But the cheesecakes I’ve eaten in restaurants or pastry shops? Always weird. They taste and look more like semi-freddo or a mousse. I therefore assumed when I made a cheesecake it would be weird like the other ones I’ve eaten here. So I never made one.

Along came Easter and I wanted to make a cheesecake. I didn’t even have a springform pan but found that pie dishes work pretty great as substitutes. And you know what? The cheesecake turned out delicious and not weird. And my husband and colleagues liked it so well I made the same one again and bought a springform pan. And if you know me, you know I rarely bake the same thing twice in a row. I’m always on to the next new recipe or at least something I haven’t made in a while. But this recipe asked to be made again. And so I did. And now you can make it, too, weird cream cheese or normal cream cheese!

Recipe adapted from omgchocolatedesserts


Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Serves about 12

Ingredients:

For the Oreo Crust

Crushing Oreos the old-fashioned way…

Crushing Oreos the old-fashioned way…

  • 24 Oreos

  • 1/4 cup / 56g butter, melted

For the Filling

  • 7.5 oz / 225g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

  • 24 oz (3 8 oz packages) / 675g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp / 125g granulated sugar

  • 2 Tbsp / 14 g cocoa powder

  • 3 eggs

For the Ganache Topping

  • 3/4 cup / 175g heavy whipping cream

  • 6 oz / 180g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

Directions:

Oven 350F / 177C. Grease an 8in - 9in / 20cm - 24cm springform pan.

Make the Oreo Crust

  1. Chop the Oreos finely, either in a food processor, by crushing with a rolling pin on a clean surface or cutting board, or by putting in a resealable plastic bag and crushing with a rolling pin or meat tenderizer.

  2. If using a food processor, pulse in the melted butter until crumbs are evenly moistened. If crushing the Oreos by hand, transfer to a bowl and stir in the butter.

  3. Press mixture evenly into the bottom of the prepared springform pan and bake for 8 minutes.

  4. Remove from oven and let cool while you prepare the filling.

Make the Filling

Spreading cream cheese mixture over baked crust

Spreading cream cheese mixture over baked crust

  1. In a double boiler or pan over low heat, melt the chocolate, stirring constantly. Remove from heat when there are still small chunks of chocolate, and continue to stir until completely melted. In this way the chocolate won’t overheat or burn. Let chocolate cool.

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl with a handheld mixer, beat cream cheese and sugar on medium speed until smooth. Changing to low speed, carefully beat in cocoa powder so that it doesn’t “poof” everywhere. Every so often stop beating and scrape down the sides of the bowl well.

  3. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until smooth.

  4. Beat in melted and cooled chocolate.

  5. Pour mixture over the crust, smoothing the top.

  6. Bake for 45 - 60 minutes, or until center is still slightly wiggly and the top looks dry.

  7. Turn the oven off and crack open the door for about 10 minutes. Remove cheesecake from oven and place in fridge until completely cooled, 8 hours or overnight.

Make the Ganache Topping

  1. In a small pan place heavy cream and chocolate over low heat. Stir constantly until the mixture is smooth and melted. Allow to cool slightly.

  2. Remove cheesecake from fridge and pour ganache evenly over the top. Allow to set before running a dull knife around the edge of cheesecake and releasing from springform pan. Alternately, if you don’t need to transport the cheesecake anywhere, you can remove the ring of the springform first and then pour the ganache over, using a spoon to guide the ganache toward the edges and allowing some to dribble down the sides.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • Not a dark chocolate fan? Try it out with milk chocolate or a mixture of milk and dark to create your preferred bitterness!

  • If you don’t own a double boiler, you can make a makeshift one by placing a small pan with an inch or so of water in the bottom and bring to a simmer. Place the chocolate in a bowl big enough that it can sit on top of the pan without touching the water. Stir constantly and proceed as in the recipe. This might take a touch more effort than just melting the chocolate in a pan, but it’s safer if you’re not used to melting chocolate so as not to burn it.

  • Powdered sugar can be substituted for the granulated, use 1 cup / 110g.

  • For cleaner slicing, try running your knife under hot water for a few seconds between slices.

American
Yield: 12
Author:

Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Oreo crust, creamy dark chocolate cheesecake filling, and a decadent dark chocolate ganache.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 1 H & 8 Mtotal time: 2 H & 8 M

ingredients:

For the Oreo Crust
  • 24 Oreos
  • 1/4 cup / 56g butter, melted
For the Filling
  • 7.5 oz / 225g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks
  • 24 oz (3 8 oz packages) / 675g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp / 125g granulated sugar
  • 2 Tbsp / 14 g cocoa powder
  • 3 eggs
For the Ganache Topping
  • 3/4 cup / 175g heavy whipping cream
  • 6 oz / 180g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

instructions:

How to cook Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Make the Oreo Crust
  1. Preheat oven to 350F / 177C. Grease an 8in - 9in / 20cm - 24cm springform pan.
  2. Chop the Oreos finely, either in a food processor, by crushing with a rolling pin on a clean surface or cutting board, or by putting in a resealable plastic bag and crushing with a rolling pin or meat tenderizer.
  3. If using a food processor, pulse in the melted butter until crumbs are evenly moistened. If crushing the Oreos by hand, transfer to a bowl and stir in the butter.
  4. Press mixture evenly into the bottom of the prepared springform pan and bake for 8 minutes.
  5. Remove from oven and let cool while you prepare the filling.
Make the Filling
  1. In a double boiler or pan over low heat, melt the chocolate, stirring constantly. Remove from heat when there are still small chunks of chocolate, and continue to stir until completely melted. In this way the chocolate won’t overheat or burn. Let chocolate cool.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl with a handheld mixer, beat cream cheese and sugar on medium speed until smooth. Changing to low speed, carefully beat in cocoa powder so that it doesn’t “poof” everywhere. Every so often stop beating and scrape down the sides of the bowl well.
  3. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until smooth.
  4. Beat in melted and cooled chocolate.
  5. Pour mixture over the crust, smoothing the top.
  6. Bake for 45 - 60 minutes, or until center is still slightly wiggly and the top looks dry.
  7. Turn the oven off and crack open the door for about 10 minutes. Remove cheesecake from oven and place in fridge until completely cooled, 8 hours or overnight.
Make the Ganache Topping
  1. In a small pan place heavy cream and chocolate over low heat. Stir constantly until the mixture is smooth and melted. Allow to cool slightly.
  2. Remove cheesecake from fridge and pour ganache evenly over the top. Allow to set before running a dull knife around the edge of cheesecake and releasing from springform pan. Alternately, if you don’t need to transport the cheesecake anywhere, you can remove the ring of the springform first and then pour the ganache over, using a spoon to guide the ganache toward the edges and allowing some to dribble down the sides.

NOTES:

Not a dark chocolate fan? Try it out with milk chocolate or a mixture of milk and dark to create your preferred bitterness! If you don’t own a double boiler, you can make a makeshift one by placing a small pan with an inch or so of water in the bottom and bring to a simmer. Place the chocolate in a bowl big enough that it can sit on top of the pan without touching the water. Stir constantly and proceed as in the recipe. This might take a touch more effort than just melting the chocolate in a pan, but it’s safer if you’re not used to melting chocolate so as not to burn it. Powdered sugar can be substituted for the granulated, use 1 cup / 110g. For cleaner slicing, try running your knife under hot water for a few seconds between slices.

Calories

715.12

Fat (grams)

54.28

Sat. Fat (grams)

31.43

Carbs (grams)

52.73

Fiber (grams)

3.26

Net carbs

49.47

Sugar (grams)

39.29

Protein (grams)

7.29

Sodium (milligrams)

316.65

Cholesterol (grams)

118.98
Nutritional Information is Approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2019-04-24+19.00.29.jpg

Sicilian Almond Cookies - Paste alle Mandorle

2019-05-13+15.18.28.jpg

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Paste alle mandorle, or almond cookies, are one of the simplest and most delicious cookie recipes you could ask for, requiring only 4 ingredients and an overnight refrigeration, so you can make the dough one day and bake the next. And because they only use almond flour, they are gluten-free friendly!

These cookies and many variations of them hail from Sicily, where the land is full of sunshine and Mediterranean breezes, charming towns, and has the perfect climate for some of the most succulent citrus fruits and almonds. Or so I’ve heard, I have yet to actually go there! The first time I found a bag of Sicilian almonds in Italy I snatched them up, hoping for a taste experience like never before. Basically setting myself up for disappointment. They were good, yes, but I think it would be best to eat them fresh, in Sicily. Until that day when I go to Sicily, I will content myself with tastes of their culture, like the occasional good arancini (fried pyramids of rice stuffed with cheese and veggies or meat) that you can find around Florence, granita ( a slushy type drink), brioche stuffed with gelato, and cannoli. And of course, these almond cookies. And they’re so simple to make. Dangerous.

Original recipe adapted and translated from GialloZafferano


Sicilian Almond Cookies - Paste alle Mandorle

Makes about 2 dozen cookies

2018-12-22 12.26.58.jpg

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups / 250g almond flour

  • 1 1/4 cups / 250g granulated sugar

  • 2 / 60g egg whites

  • 1/2 tsp almond extract

Garnishes (optional)

  • powdered sugar

  • whole, sliced, or slivered almonds

Directions:

Oven 350F / 180C

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour and the sugar.

  2. Mix in the egg whites and the almond extract until thoroughly combined. This can be done with a spoon, a hand mixer, stand mixer, or even in a food processor.

  3. Cover dough and place in fridge overnight or for at least 7 hours.

  4. Remove dough from fridge and roll into balls, then roll in powdered sugar. Flatten cookies a bit, as they will not spread much in the oven. Press in a few almond slices on top. Alternately, shape them as you wish, as they hold their shape well after the overnight refrigeration.

  5. Place cookies on a silpat or parchment covered baking sheet, leaving about 1” between cookies.

  6. Bake in preheated oven for 8-12 minutes, until just lightly golden. Be careful no to overbake, cookies should be crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • If you have almonds and a method to grind them, such as a food processor, go ahead and make fresh almond flour! Be careful not to overgrind, you don’t want the almonds to heat up and the oil to start to escape, resulting in almond butter.

  • If you prefer other extracts, go ahead and play around with other flavors; vanilla, orange, lemon, coconut, etc.

  • This recipe, if you go by weight instead of imperial measurements, is very easy to modify or double, triple, halve, etc.! You can see that the ratio of almond flour to sugar is 1:1: essentially all you have to do is mix together equal weights of almond flour and sugar, with just enough egg whites to bind them together easily and a touch of extract for flavor. Voila.

  • These cookies have many variants and shapes and are often piped with candied cherries on top. I’m not a huge candied fruit person, and so I found a simple recipe and omitted the piping for one of the simpler almond cookie methods, rolling in powdered sugar and decorating with almonds.

Italian
Yield: 24
Author:

Sicilian Almond Cookies - Paste alle Mandorle

A classic Italian cookie originating in Sicily with a soft center and crunchy exterior. 4 ingredients and gluten-free.
prep time: 30 Mcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 42 M

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups / 250g almond flour
  • 1 1/4 cups / 250g granulated sugar
  • 2 / 60g egg whites
  • 1/2 tsp almond extract
Garnishes (optional)
  • powdered sugar
  • whole, sliced, or slivered almonds

instructions:

How to cook Sicilian Almond Cookies - Paste alle Mandorle

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the almond flour and the sugar.
  2. Mix in the egg whites and the almond extract until thoroughly combined. This can be done with a spoon, a hand mixer, stand mixer, or even in a food processor.
  3. Cover dough and place in fridge overnight or for at least 7 hours.
  4. Remove dough from fridge and roll into balls, then roll in powdered sugar. Flatten cookies a bit, as they will not spread much in the oven. Press in a few almond slices on top. Alternately, shape them as you wish, as they hold their shape well after the overnight refrigeration.
  5. Place cookies on a silpat or parchment covered baking sheet, leaving about 1” between cookies.
  6. Bake in preheated oven for 8-12 minutes, until just lightly golden. Be careful no to overbake, cookies should be crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.

NOTES:

If you have almonds and a method to grind them, such as a food processor, go ahead and make fresh almond flour! Be careful not to overgrind, you don’t want the almonds to heat up and the oil to start to escape, resulting in almond butter. If you prefer other extracts, go ahead and play around with other flavors; vanilla, orange, lemon, coconut, etc. This recipe, if you go by weight instead of imperial measurements, is very easy to modify or double, triple, halve, etc.! You can see that the ratio of almond flour to sugar is 1:1: essentially all you have to do is mix together equal weights of almond flour and sugar, with just enough egg whites to bind them together easily and a touch of extract for flavor. Voila. These cookies have many variants and shapes and are often piped with candied cherries on top. I’m not a huge candied fruit person, and so I found a simple recipe and omitted the piping for one of the simpler almond cookie methods, rolling in powdered sugar and decorating with almonds.

Calories

110.04

Fat (grams)

5.24

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.40

Carbs (grams)

14.38

Fiber (grams)

1.31

Net carbs

13.07

Sugar (grams)

12.51

Protein (grams)

2.76

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2019-05-13+15.17.27-2.jpg

Mocha Punch

2018-12-29+15.42.50.jpg

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On entering any coffee shop in America, you’ll easily find mocha on the menu. I usually think of black coffee and cappuccino as being among the most commonly ordered, vanilla latte and mocha closely following. Because after enjoying coffee in its purer forms it is logical to then pair it with two of the greatest flavors: vanilla and chocolate. No? But I’m not a barista, so if you are, you tell me. :)

This is not the case in Italy. Italy may be the birthplace of coffee as we know it today, but that doesn’t mean that they own ALL the copyrights to the best coffee drinks. Cappuccino, espresso, macchiato….but Vanilla Latte and Mocha are not on the menu here, unless you go to one of the few “American” coffee shops, such as Arnold. First of all, if you order a latte you will get….milk. And if you order a mocha you will get…a withering stare. Not the end of the world, especially with all of the other types of coffee you can order, but sometimes I just want a mocha, ya know? I usually order my cappuccino with cocoa powder on top, but that’s not quite the same.

What’s a person to do when they don’t have mocha readily available to them? Make it at home, of course! It’s so easy, and can be even easier in a pinch, see my notes below!

But doesn’t the title say punch, you ask? Yes, yes it does. The recipe that follows can be drunk as a classic mocha, hot or iced, by simply not adding the ice cream. Or, as per the recipe, pour the whole thing in a punch bowl, add scoops of ice cream, and voila! Mocha punch fit for any party.

Recipe adapted from a friend’s mama. :)


Mocha Punch

Serves about 20

Ingredients:

  • 3 quarts / 3 L freshly brewed strong coffee

  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g sugar

  • 2 quarts / 2 L milk

  • 3/4 cup / 240g chocolate syrup, try this homemade recipe!

  • 3 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1/2 gallon (8 cups) / 1 kg vanilla ice cream

Directions:

  1. Pour brewed coffee into a large pot, bowl, or other large container. Stir sugar into hot coffee until dissolved. Cool in fridge.

  2. Remove coffee from fridge and add milk, chocolate syrup, and vanilla and stir until well combined.

  3. Chill until cold or overnight.

  4. Just before serving, pour into serving container, mix briefly, and scoop ice cream into the punch, allowing the ice cream to melt for a few minutes before serving. (Skip this step if not serving as a punch.)

  5. Store in fridge.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • For an everyday mocha I reduce the sugar and milk, sometimes by up to half, as I usually drink my coffee black, and it makes it less indulgent.

  • You can substitute store-bought chocolate syrup for the homemade and use instant coffee instead of brewing, if you wish! I think the flavor will always be superior when you make things from scratch, or in this instance, use good and fresh coffee instead of instant!

  • If you choose to make the homemade chocolate syrup recipe, make a half recipe for exactly the quantity needed for this Mocha Punch. Or make a full recipe and enjoy the extra!

  • Of course, you don’t have to use vanilla ice cream, you could use chocolate or moose tracks or heck, coffee ice cream! Whatever you like.

  • When serving, you can choose to pour the whole recipe’s worth of punch into a punch bowl with ice cream, or, for smaller or longer parties, start with just a portion of the punch and ice cream, keeping the remainder in the fridge and freezer, respectively, so by the end the punch isn’t warm and the ice cream long melted.

  • This punch is easily stored in pitchers or empty milk jugs!

American
Yield: 20
Author:

Mocha Punch

Sweet and creamy coffee meets chocolate in this adaptable mocha. Add ice cream for a delectable party punch or drink hot or cold for an anytime mocha!
prep time: 25 Mcook time: total time: 25 M

ingredients:

  • 3 quarts / 3 L freshly brewed strong coffee
  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g sugar
  • 2 quarts / 2 L milk
  • 3/4 cup / 240g chocolate syrup, try this homemade recipe!
  • 3 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 gallon (8 cups) / 1 kg vanilla ice cream

instructions:

How to cook Mocha Punch

  1. Pour brewed coffee into a large pot, bowl, or other large container. Stir sugar into hot coffee until dissolved. Cool in fridge.
  2. Remove coffee from fridge and add milk, chocolate syrup, and vanilla and stir until well combined.
  3. Chill until cold or overnight.
  4. Just before serving, pour into serving container, mix briefly, and scoop ice cream into the punch, allowing the ice cream to melt for a few minutes before serving. (Skip this step if not serving as a punch.)
  5. Store in fridge.

NOTES:

For an everyday mocha I reduce the sugar and milk, sometimes by up to half, as I usually drink my coffee black, and it makes it less indulgent. You can substitute store-bought chocolate syrup for the homemade and use instant coffee instead of brewing, if you wish! I think the flavor will always be superior when you make things from scratch, or in this instance, use good and fresh coffee instead of instant! If you choose to make the homemade chocolate syrup recipe, make a half recipe for exactly the quantity needed for this Mocha Punch. Or make a full recipe and enjoy the extra! Of course, you don’t have to use vanilla ice cream, you could use chocolate or moose tracks or heck, coffee ice cream! Whatever you like. When serving, you can choose to pour the whole recipe’s worth of punch into a punch bowl with ice cream, or, for smaller or longer parties, start with just a portion of the punch and ice cream, keeping the remainder in the fridge and freezer, respectively, so by the end the punch isn’t warm and the ice cream long melted. This punch is easily stored in pitchers or empty milk jugs!

Calories

202.41

Fat (grams)

4.98

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.02

Carbs (grams)

33.94

Fiber (grams)

0.49

Net carbs

33.45

Sugar (grams)

26.31

Protein (grams)

5.27

Sodium (milligrams)

91.66

Cholesterol (grams)

19.30
Nutritional information is approximate. Calculated including vanilla ice cream
Created using The Recipes Generator
2018-12-29+15.44.21-2.jpg

Chocolate Sauce

Photo Public Domain  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/at/deed.en   Permission: Sammlung J.P. Adlbrecht

Photo Public Domain https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/at/deed.en Permission: Sammlung J.P. Adlbrecht

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Classic. Quintessential. Chocolatey. Good on everything, from your morning pancakes and coffee to ice cream and that cake you just made. Or ya know, by the spoonful. Just a spoonful of…I’ll let you sing the rest yourself. ;)

What is it? Chocolate Sauce! I’m sorry, come again? Chocolate Sauce!!!! I didn’t hear you!! CHOCOLATE SAUCE!!!!!!!! That’s right. Or chocolate syrup, as you prefer. No more Hershey’s in a bottle, or going without if you live outside the USofA. It’s so easy you’ll wonder why you never made it before. No high fructose corn syrup involved!

Recipe from my Mama


Chocolate Sauce

Makes about 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar

  • 1/3 cup / 33g unsweetened cocoa powder

  • 1 Tbsp / 7.5g cornstarch

  • 1/2 cup / 118g water

  • 1 tsp vanilla

Directions:

  1. Combine sugar, cocoa, and cornstarch in a small saucepan.

  2. Add water and whisk until there are no lumps.

  3. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils. Reduce heat to low and boil for 5 minutes, continuing to stir.

  4. Remove from heat and add vanilla.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The better quality your cocoa powder the better your sauce will taste!

  • Keeps well in the fridge.

American
Yield: 12
Author:

Chocolate Sauce

A basic chocolate sauce for drizzling, mixing, and all your dessert needs.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: total time: 20 M

ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup / 150g sugar
  • 1/3 cup / 33g unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 Tbsp / 7.5g cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup / 118g water
  • 1 tsp vanilla

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Sauce

  1. Combine sugar, cocoa, and cornstarch in a small saucepan.
  2. Add water and whisk until there are no lumps.
  3. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils. Reduce heat to low and boil for 5 minutes, continuing to stir.
  4. Remove from heat and add vanilla.

NOTES:

The better quality your cocoa powder the better your sauce will taste! Keeps well in the fridge.

Calories

63.04

Fat (grams)

0.27

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.00

Carbs (grams)

14.76

Fiber (grams)

0.56

Net carbs

14.21

Sugar (grams)

12.52

Protein (grams)

0.55

Sodium (milligrams)

0.61

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator


The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

2018-12-20 14.16.59.jpg

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Fluffy? Isn’t key lime pie supposed to be creamy, custardy, silken? Yes! And this recipe is all of those things but with a special touch of fluffiness, thanks to our friends the egg whites. Whipped egg whites. It’s magical. And with Easter just around the corner, this is the perfect dessert to celebrate with! I even gave you two weeks time to plan ahead, aren't I nice?

I don’t know why I always want to make citrus desserts for Easter, maybe because it’s always in the spring. And in the spring everything is coming alive, the rebirth of nature, and calls for bright, happy citrus flavors. You can’t call citrus sad. And what is Easter but the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus, giving those who believe on Him new life? The celebration of rebirth. It all fits. Not to mention if you observe Lent, getting to eat what you gave up for 6 weeks is lovely.

And whether you have a big Easter meal planned or not, you’re going to want to make this pie. And if you’ve never made key lime pie before? This is not a bad place to start. Just be warned that other key lime pies after this one might be…tame.

Recipe adapted from the Williams-Sonoma cookbook Savoring America


The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Serves 8-12

2018-12-20+14.27.07.jpg

Ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust

  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)

  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans

  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger

  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon

  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled

For the Filling

  • 4 eggs, separated

  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here

  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice

  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest

  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

For the Topping and Garnish

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar

  • 1/8 tsp almond extract

  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

Directions:

Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.

Make the Gingersnap Crust

  1. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.

  2. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.

Make the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.

  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.

  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.

  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.

  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Make the Topping

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.

  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things!

  • Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice.

  • If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest.

  • No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

American
Yield: 8-12 servings
Author:

The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Classic key lime pie with a twist. Tart filling made extra light and fluffy by whipping the egg whites, a spicy gingersnap crust, and fresh whipped cream.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 80 M

ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust
  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)
  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans
  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled
For the Filling
  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here
  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
For the Topping and Garnish
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/8 tsp almond extract
  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

instructions:

How to cook The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Make the Gingersnap Crust
  1. Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.
  3. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.
Make the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.
  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.
  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.
  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.
  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.
Make the Topping
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.
  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

NOTES:

The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things! Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice. If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest. No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

Calories

590.80

Fat (grams)

29.69

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.77

Carbs (grams)

76.33

Fiber (grams)

1.88

Net carbs

74.45

Sugar (grams)

55.81

Protein (grams)

8.28

Sodium (milligrams)

256.68

Cholesterol (grams)

90.75
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2018-12-20 14.14.52-2.jpg



Pumpkin Pudding

IMG_5018.JPG

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Fall is coming fall is coming! Or, autumn is coming autumn is coming! Either way, I’m excited. I love the changing of seasons and the different nostalgias and expectations that come with each one. Living in Italy, the nostalgia is a little bit stronger. Autumn is still autumn, but the changes are a little less distinct, and the comfort of knowing where to pick out the best pumpkins and buy the best apple cider is not something I have down pat yet. It’s not even that easy, finding the new places to do the things you’ve always done, because some things aren’t done here, or at least not in the magnitude they are in the States. Pumpkins will be few and far between, unless you’re lucky enough to stumble upon some markets that have the mini gourds; apple cider is practically nonexistent; trick-or-treating happens, but most Italians wear scary costumes instead of characters; the leaf change is not the brilliant red, orange, and yellows like in Michigan, but more of a subtle green-to-yellow with the occasional leaves fluttering down. Despite the differences with what I grew up with, there are still oodles of things I love to do to make my home fall-y and to welcome the chilly evenings. Lighting candles, brewing tea, pulling out the fuzzy socks and sweaters (even if I’d be sweating if I actually tried to wear them yet) and baking and eating lots of fall goodies that include pumpkin, cinnamon, and spices, breads, soups, and hearty autumn recipes.

Now that I’m officially feeling ready for fall after dwelling in those thoughts, what are we making? Pumpkin Pudding! It’s like pumpkin pie, but without all the fuss of the crust. This is great to make in the time leading up to Thanksgiving, because you’re not ruining your appetite for pumpkin pie (you can’t call it pie if it doesn’t have a crust, therefore, totally different) while not wasting time NOT eating pumpkin. Oh, and so, so easy.

Recipe from my mama


Pumpkin Pudding

IMG_5023.JPG

Serves: 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 15 oz / 425g pumpkin purée

  • 2/3 cup / 132g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt

  • 1 tsp / 5g cinnamon

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g ginger

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g cloves

  • 1 cup / 237g milk of choice

Directions:

Oven 375F / 190C. Lightly greased 8x8in / 20x20cm baking pan.

  1. Mix all ingredients in a bowl until smooth.

  2. Pour into prepared pan; bake for 20-25 minutes in preheated oven until edges are bubbling.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • To dress this lovely and simple dessert up you can top it with confectioner’s sugar or crumbled cookies such as shortbread or Nilla Wafers, or serve with ice cream and/or whipped cream.

  • This recipe is gluten free, vegan (if you use a milk substitute like coconut or almond), and probably many of the other diet fads that I can’t quite keep track of. Eat up!

American
Yield: 4-6
Author:

Pumpkin Pudding

Like pumpkin pie but without the hassle of the crust. Gluten-free and can easily be made vegan.
prep time: 10 Mcook time: 25 Mtotal time: 35 M

ingredients:

  • 15 oz / 425g pumpkin purée
  • 2/3 cup / 132g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt
  • 1 tsp / 5g cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g ginger
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g cloves
  • 1 cup / 237g milk of choice

instructions:

How to cook Pumpkin Pudding

  1. Oven 375F / 190C. Lightly greased 8x8in / 20x20cm baking pan.
  2. Mix all ingredients in a bowl until smooth.
  3. Pour into prepared pan; bake for 20-25 minutes in preheated oven until edges are bubbling.

NOTES:

To dress this lovely and simple dessert up you can top it with confectioner’s sugar or crumbled cookies such as shortbread or Nilla Wafers, or serve with ice cream and/or whipped cream. This recipe is gluten free, vegan (if you use a milk substitute like coconut or almond), and probably many of the other diet fads that I can’t quite keep track of. Eat up!

Calories

198.32

Fat (grams)

1.49

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.88

Carbs (grams)

45.81

Fiber (grams)

3.85

Net carbs

41.97

Sugar (grams)

36.49

Protein (grams)

3.31

Sodium (milligrams)

279.59

Cholesterol (grams)

4.74
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 4 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
The slowly melting confectioner’s sugar…

The slowly melting confectioner’s sugar…




Chocolate Thumbprint Cheesecake Cookies

2017-12-19+13.08.33.jpg

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I like cookies.  I like cheesecake.  What happens when you put them together?  These Cheesecake Cookies!  And you know what's great about this recipe?  Besides being delicious, of course, is that it calls for one sleeve of graham crackers.  Perfect for all those times you buy a box of graham crackers to make a crust or similar recipe that usually call for two sleeves of graham crackers and leave you hanging with just one lonely sleeve.  Cheesecake Cookies to the rescue!  They look more time consuming to make than they really are, it's pretty straightforward.  So let's get to it! 

Recipe adapted from Kitchme


Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

Makes about 24 cookies

Ingredients:

2017-12-19 13.12.33.jpg
  • 1 1/4 cups / 135g (1 sleeve) finely crushed chocolate graham crackers

  • 3/4 cup / 90g all-purpose flour

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter, softened

  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar

  • 1 egg, separated

  • 3 ounces / 85g cream cheese, softened

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, optional

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line 2 cookies sheets with parchment or silicone mats.  

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together graham cracker crumbs, flour, and baking powder.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the butter with the brown sugar.  Beat in the egg white.  Add the mixture to the graham cracker mixture and mix until combined.  

  3. Again, in the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat the cream cheese until smooth and creamy.  Add the sugar, egg yolk, zest, and vanilla and beat until smooth.  Set aside.

  4. Using a spoon or small ice cream scoop, scoop a very generous tablespoon worth of dough onto the prepared cookie sheet.  (If your graham cracker dough seems too soft to easily hold its shape, add a bit more flour.)  Repeat until all the dough has been scooped onto the cookies sheets, evenly spaced, leaving room for them to spread.  

  5. Press your thumb into the cookies to make a deep well; fill with the cream cheese mixture. 

  6. Bake 8-11 minutes or until the filling is just set.  

Can't do anything around here.

Can't do anything around here.

Jenny's Notes:

  • Use any flavor graham crackers, regular, cinnamon, chocolate! You could also experiment with similar cookies, such as teddy grahams.

  • Regular sugar can be substituted for the brown sugar with a slightly different texture for the cookie. Not bad, just slightly different. Or add a teaspoon or two of molasses to 1/2 cup regular sugar and mix before adding to the recipe.

  • You can fill the cookies right to the top with the cream cheese as the filling shouldn't do more than puff a bit in the oven.

  • Feel free to add different extracts and zests to your cream cheese filling, if you wish, or even cocoa to make it ALL chocolate! I'm thinking cinnamon graham crackers with a touch of orange extract and orange zest for a fall treat!

American
Yield: 24
Author:

Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

Chocolate graham cracker thumbprint cookies filled with a cream cheese filling.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 11 Mtotal time: 61 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups / 135g (1 sleeve) finely crushed chocolate graham crackers
  • 3/4 cup / 90g all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar
  • 1 egg, separated
  • 3 ounces / 85g cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, optional

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Cheesecake Cookies

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line 2 cookies sheets with parchment or silicone mats.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together graham cracker crumbs, flour, and baking powder.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the butter with the brown sugar. Beat in the egg white. Add the mixture to the graham cracker mixture and mix until combined.
  4. Again, in the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat the cream cheese until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar, egg yolk, zest, and vanilla and beat until smooth. Set aside.
  5. Using a spoon or small ice cream scoop, scoop a very generous tablespoon worth of dough onto the prepared cookie sheet. (If your graham cracker dough seems too soft to easily hold its shape, add a bit more flour.) Repeat until all the dough has been scooped onto the cookies sheets, evenly spaced, leaving room for them to spread.
  6. Press your thumb into the cookies to make a deep well; fill with the cream cheese mixture.
  7. Bake 8-11 minutes or until the filling is just set.

NOTES:

Use any flavor graham crackers, regular, cinnamon, chocolate! You could also experiment with similar cookies, such as teddy grahams. Regular sugar can be substituted for the brown sugar with a slightly different texture for the cookie. Not bad, just slightly different. Or add a teaspoon or two of molasses to 1/2 cup regular sugar and mix before adding to the recipe. You can fill the cookies right to the top with the cream cheese as the filling shouldn't do more than puff a bit in the oven. Feel free to add different extracts and zests to your cream cheese filling, if you wish, or even cocoa to make it ALL chocolate! I'm thinking cinnamon graham crackers with a touch of orange extract and orange zest for a fall treat!

Calories

111.78

Fat (grams)

6.07

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.44

Carbs (grams)

13.46

Fiber (grams)

0.31

Net carbs

13.15

Sugar (grams)

8.41

Protein (grams)

1.29

Sodium (milligrams)

108.74

Cholesterol (grams)

21.56
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2017-12-19+13.04.04.jpg