Overnight Bagels

IMG_2103.jpg

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Bagels. Who doesn’t love them? Especially toasted with cream cheese or butter melting on top. Everyone has their favorite bagel, where to get them and how to eat them, whether that’s the chewy and dense boiled variety or the slightly lighter and more modern steamed versions, plain or everything, toasted with cream cheese, eaten plain, or eaten as a sandwich.

One of my favorite bagel memories is from New York City where I spent two summers training with the American Ballet Theatre when I was a teenager. On the weekends my mom and I would go on adventures exploring the city, usually walking an average of 15 miles a day and thus needing sustenance. I remember particularly well one morning passing a bagel shop and a few minutes later exiting with a freshly toasted bagel smothered in cream cheese and wrapped in tinfoil. So simple, so inexpensive, and I still think of that bagel as one of the best I’ve ever had. So I guess you could say I’m a NYC bagel girl, but to be fair, I don’t think I’ve had any (at least not-from-a-hotel-breakfast-bar bagels) in any of the major cities famed for bagels, such as Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston, or Los Angeles. And I’ve been to all those cities! Too bad I didn’t know they had amazing bagels or I would’ve done a trial and comparison. Ah well, just have to go back I guess!

I am blogging this bagel recipe which involves an overnight ferment and boiling, because I think IT’S SO YUMMY. I’m not going to tout this recipe as the bagel recipe to end all bagel recipes, because frankly, I’m not into that kind of marketing and I believe there are other valid methods and types of bagel recipes out there. This recipe comes from Peter Reinhart’s book The Breadmaker’s Apprentice, and as he says, this is a bagel for the ages. And he knows what he’s talking about, so you should try this recipe. You can buy the cookbook by clinking on the link to the right!

I am blogging this bagel recipe which involves an overnight ferment and boiling, because I think IT’S SO YUMMY. I’m not going to tout this recipe as the bagel recipe to end all bagel recipes, because frankly, I’m not into that kind of marketing and I believe there are other valid methods and types of bagel recipes out there. This recipe comes from Peter Reinhart’s book The Breadmaker’s Apprentice, and as he says, this is a bagel for the ages. And he knows what he’s talking about, so you should try this recipe. You can buy the cookbook by clinking on the link to the right!

Don’t let the overnight ferment or multi-step process scare you, it’s really quite fun and not nearly as tricky as I had always imagined making bagels to be. You will need to clear some space in your fridge and in your schedule, but if I can do it in my tiny Italian kitchen with my tiny toaster-sized oven, so can you, wherever you are baking! I recommend reading the recipe through once or twice before making a game plan. (As you should with every recipe!)

What follows is a slightly modified version of Peter Reinhart’s recipe. The ingredients are basically identical but the instructions I have rewritten in my own words and in places slightly changed or modified to accommodate tips and tricks that worked really well for me and might work for you, too!


Overnight Bagels

Makes 12 big or 24 small bagels

Ingredients:

For the Sponge

  • 1 tsp / 3g instant yeast

  • 4 cups / 510g bread flour

  • 2 1/2 cups / 567g water

For the Dough

  • 1/2 tsp / 1.5g instant yeast

  • 3 3/4 cups / 482g bread flour

  • 2 3/4 tsp / 20g salt

  • 2 tsp / 9.5g malt powder OR flavoring of choice: 1 Tbsp / 14g dark or light malt syrup, honey, or dark or light brown sugar

For Boiling the Bagels

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g baking soda, optional, or malt syrup or honey

  • a large pot of water, the wider the pot the better

  • cornmeal or semolina, for dusting

Toppings, any or all of the following

  • sesame seeds

  • poppy seeds

  • salt flakes

  • rehydrated minced garlic

  • rehydrated minced onion

Directions:

DAY 1

Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper and grease well.

Make the Sponge

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or large bowl, stir the yeast into the flour. Add the water and stir just until a sticky dough has formed, similar to pancake batter.

  2. Cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for about 2 hours, or until it becomes very bubbly and active. It should be about twice the size and collapse when the bowl is tapped on the countertop.

Make the Dough

  1. Once the sponge is ready, add the next measurement of yeast and mix on low speed with the dough hook or by hand with a spoon. Next, add 3 cups / 383g of the next measurement of flour, the salt, and malt powder / flavoring of choice. Stir on low speed for about 3 minutes, or with a spoon until you have a mostly homogeneous ball. Slowly add the remaining 3/4 cup / 99g flour to stiffen the dough a bit.

  2. Knead the dough on medium-low speed for about 6 minutes or turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for about 10 minutes. The dough should be smooth and firm yet pliable, not sticky, with all flour worked in. If it seems too dry or there is excess flour throughout, add a few drops of water until you reach the desired consistency. Likewise if it’s too sticky, add in a bit of flour until you reach the correct stiffness. At this point the dough should pass the windowpane test. (Stretch a small piece of dough between your thumbs and forefingers; if enough gluten has developed through kneading the dough should stretch thin where you can see light coming through. If it breaks before you can stretch it thin, knead another few minutes and try again. See photo.)

Weigh and Shape the Dough

IMG_2100.jpg
  1. Weigh your dough ball and divide the weight by the number of bagels you wish to make: If you’re making mini bagels, divide the weight by 24, or if you’re making regular bagels, divide the weight by 12. This will give you the goal weight for each dough ball you are about to make. For example, the weight of my dough ball the last time I made these bagels was 1,566g. 1,566g divided by 12 for regular bagels = about 130g each. Or, 1,566g divided by 24 for mini bagels = about 65g each.

  2. Once you have your goal weight for the dough balls, divide the dough ball in half, then keep dividing the halves and quarters until you have 12 or 24 dough chunks. Weigh each chunk and add or subtract a bit of dough until they are all within about 5g of the goal weight. Roll each dough chunk under your palm with a cupped hand in a circular motion, guiding with the outer edge of your palm, until you have a nice ball. It works best to roll them on a surface with little to no flour. This way the dough sticks slightly to the surface as you move in a circular motion and pulls and creates surface tension.

  3. Place the dough balls on a lightly floured surface and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rest for approximately 20 minutes.

  4. Shape each dough ball into bagel form by poking your thumb through the center of the ball and rotating your thumb around the inside of the hole or lassoing it a few times around your thumb, until the hole is about 2 1/2 in / 6 cm for regular bagels or 1 1/2 in / 4 cm for mini. Aim to stretch the bagel as evenly as possible, avoiding a thick and thin side so you won’t end up with lopsided bagels. Alternately, you can roll the doll ball into an 8 in / 20 cm long rope, wrap it around your knuckles with the seam on the under side, then rock the seam on the counter until sealed.

  5. Place the shaped bagels onto the greased baking sheets about 2 inches apart. Mist with spray oil or rub on oil, then slip each sheet into a clean, food-grade plastic bag or cover with plastic wrap.

  6. Place bagels in the fridge to rise overnight. They are best if used the next day, but can be kept up to three days in the fridge.

DAY 2

Boil the Bagels

  1. Test to see if the bagels are ready to be boiled by removing one carefully from the fridge and placing in a bowl of cool or tepid water. If the bagel floats within 10 seconds, it’s ready. Immediately return the bagel to the covered baking sheet in the fridge while you ready the water.

    If the bagel does not float within 10 seconds, either return it to the fridge and repeat the float test every couple hours until the bagels are ready, or remove both sheets of bagels from the fridge and let raise at room temperature, repeating the float test every 10 to 20 minutes until a bagel passes. Return them to the fridge once they are ready so they don’t over-rise. The stiffness of the dough, your house temperature, and your fridge temperature will all impact when the bagels are ready to be boiled.

    If your bagels have over-risen (you can tell if they collapse when you gently handle them or if they overly deflate when boiled) or they have stuck to the pan, transfer them as carefully as you can to another better-oiled parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise at room temperature for another 15-20 minutes or until they pass the float test again. Return them to the fridge once they are ready.

  2. When the bagels are just about ready, place the large pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil, then add baking soda, if using. Have a skimmer or slotted spoon ready nearby. Preheat the oven to 500F / 260C and place two racks in the middle of the oven.

  3. Remove one sheet of bagels from the fridge and gently slide 3-4 into the boiling water, or however many can fit comfortably side to side. Boil for 30 seconds to 1 minute on one side, then flip each bagel and boil for another 30 seconds to 1 minute. Bagels boiled for 1 minute on each side will be chewier than those boiled for only 30 seconds on each side.

    While the bagels are boiling, sprinkle the same parchment lined baking sheet with cornmeal or semolina.

  4. When it’s time to remove the bagels, use the slotted spoon and place them back on the baking sheet now sprinkled with cornmeal. Add toppings immediately while the bagels are still wet, if you choose to use toppings. Repeat with the second sheet of bagels.

Bake the Bagels

  1. Place both baking sheets of bagels in the preheated oven. Bake for 7 minutes, then switch the pans on the racks and rotate each 180 degrees to bake the bagels as evenly as possible.

    After you switch and rotate, lower the oven temperature to 450F / 232C and bake for another 7-8 minutes, or until light golden brown.

  2. Remove from the oven and allow bagels to cool for 15 minutes before devouring.


Jenny’s Notes:

  • To keep my scale clean while weighing the dough I place the now-empty bowl (don’t have to clean it, the dough was just in there) and press tare. You can also use a piece of plastic film wrap over the scale and tare if needed.

  • I like to make 6 regular bagels and 12 mini for variety. You can do this by weighing your dough ball and then dividing it in half. Weigh one half and divide this number by 6; then weigh the other half and divide by 12.

  • I love lassoing the bagels while shaping them! Fast, fun, and effective. Not as big a fan of the rope and seal version, I thought it took longer and the finishing ring was not as symmetrical. Try out both versions to find which works best for you!

  • I found it best to make the dough in the evening and boil and bake the bagels in the morning or they over-rose, but I believe this is mostly due to my not-cold-enough fridge. If you have a cold and well functioning fridge, you should be fine to make and bake the bagels at your leisure!

  • When baking the bagels, know your oven. If you have hot spots or a small oven, you can choose to bake one sheet of bagels at a time. Since my oven is small, I baked the first sheet of bagels while I was boiling the second sheet, and simply rotated the pan 180 degrees after the first 7 minutes.

Jewish-American
Yield: 12-24
Author:

Overnight Bagels

A recipe from Peter Reinhart's "The Breadmaker's Apprentice." The bagels get an overnight ferment leading to increased umami flavor and are boiled for optimal chewiness.
prep time: 1 H & 45 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 1 H & 60 M

ingredients:

For the Sponge
  • 1 tsp / 3g instant yeast
  • 4 cups / 510g bread flour
  • 2 1/2 cups / 567g water
For the Dough
  • 1/2 tsp / 1.5g instant yeast
  • 3 3/4 cups / 482g bread flour
  • 2 3/4 tsp / 20g salt
  • 2 tsp / 9.5g malt powder OR flavoring of choice: 1 Tbsp / 14g dark or light malt syrup, honey, or dark or light brown sugar
For Boiling the Bagels
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g baking soda, optional, or malt syrup or honey
  • a large pot of water, the wider the pot the better
  • cornmeal or semolina, for dusting
Toppings, any or all of the following
  • sesame seeds
  • poppy seeds
  • salt flakes
  • rehydrated minced garlic
  • rehydrated minced onion

instructions:

How to cook Overnight Bagels

DAY 1 Make the Sponge
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or large bowl, stir the yeast into the flour. Add the water and stir just until a sticky dough has formed, similar to pancake batter.
  2. Cover the bowl with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for about 2 hours, or until it becomes very bubbly and active. It should be about twice the size and collapse when the bowl is tapped on the countertop.
Make the Dough
  1. Once the sponge is ready, add the next measurement of yeast and mix on low speed with the dough hook or by hand with a spoon. Next, add 3 cups / 383g of the next measurement of flour, the salt, and malt powder / flavoring of choice. Stir on low speed for about 3 minutes, or with a spoon until you have a mostly homogeneous ball. Slowly add the remaining 3/4 cup / 99g flour to stiffen the dough a bit.
  2. Knead the dough on medium-low speed for about 6 minutes or turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for about 10 minutes. The dough should be smooth and firm yet pliable, not sticky, with all flour worked in. If it seems too dry or there is excess flour throughout, add a few drops of water until you reach the desired consistency. Likewise if it’s too sticky, add in a bit of flour until you reach the correct stiffness. At this point the dough should pass the windowpane test. (Stretch a small piece of dough between your thumbs and forefingers; if enough gluten has developed through kneading the dough should stretch thin where you can see light coming through. If it breaks before you can stretch it thin, knead another few minutes and try again.)
Weigh and Shape the Dough
  1. Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper and grease well.
  2. Weigh your dough ball and divide the weight by the number of bagels you wish to make: If you’re making mini bagels, divide the weight by 24, or if you’re making regular bagels, divide the weight by 12. This will give you the goal weight for each dough ball you are about to make. For example, the weight of my dough ball the last time I made these bagels was 1,566g. 1,566g divided by 12 for regular bagels = about 130g each. Or, 1,566g divided by 24 for mini bagels = about 65g each.
  3. Once you have your goal weight for the dough balls, divide the dough ball in half, then keep dividing the halves and quarters until you have 12 or 24 dough chunks. Weigh each chunk and add or subtract a bit of dough until they are all within about 5g of the goal weight. Roll each dough chunk under your palm with a cupped hand in a circular motion, guiding with the outer edge of your palm, until you have a nice ball. It works best to roll them on a surface with little to no flour. This way the dough sticks slightly to the surface as you move in a circular motion and pulls and creates surface tension.
  4. Place the dough balls on a lightly floured surface and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rest for approximately 20 minutes.
  5. Shape each dough ball into bagel form by poking your thumb through the center of the ball and rotating your thumb around the inside of the hole or lassoing it a few times around your thumb, until the hole is about 2 1/2 in / 6 cm for regular bagels or 1 1/2 in / 4 cm for mini. Aim to stretch the bagel as evenly as possible, avoiding a thick and thin side so you won’t end up with lopsided bagels. Alternately, you can roll the doll ball into an 8 in / 20 cm long rope, wrap it around your knuckles with the seam on the under side, then rock the seam on the counter until sealed.
  6. Place the shaped bagels onto the greased baking sheets about 2 inches apart. Mist with spray oil or rub on oil, then slip each sheet into a clean, food-grade plastic bag or cover with plastic wrap.
  7. Place bagels in the fridge to rise overnight. They are best if used the next day, but can be kept up to three days in the fridge.
DAY 2 Boil the Bagels
  1. Test to see if the bagels are ready to be boiled by removing one carefully from the fridge and placing in a bowl of cool or tepid water. If the bagel floats within 10 seconds, it’s ready. Immediately return the bagel to the covered baking sheet in the fridge while you ready the water.
  2. If the bagel does not float within 10 seconds, either return it to the fridge and repeat the float test every couple hours until the bagels are ready, or remove both sheets of bagels from the fridge and let raise at room temperature, repeating the float test every 10 to 20 minutes until a bagel passes. Return them to the fridge once they are ready so they don’t over-rise. The stiffness of the dough, your house temperature, and your fridge temperature will all impact when the bagels are ready to be boiled.
  3. If your bagels have over-risen (you can tell if they collapse when you gently handle them or if they overly deflate when boiled) or they have stuck to the pan, transfer them as carefully as you can to another better-oiled parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise at room temperature for another 15-20 minutes or until they pass the float test again. Return them to the fridge once they are ready.
  4. When the bagels are just about ready, place the large pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil, then add baking soda, if using. Have a skimmer or slotted spoon ready nearby. Preheat the oven to 500F / 260C and place two racks in the middle of the oven.
  5. Remove one sheet of bagels from the fridge and gently slide 3-4 into the boiling water, or however many can fit comfortably side to side. Boil for 30 seconds to 1 minute on one side, then flip each bagel and boil for another 30 seconds to 1 minute. Bagels boiled for 1 minute on each side will be chewier than those boiled for only 30 seconds on each side.
  6. While the bagels are boiling, sprinkle the same parchment lined baking sheet with cornmeal or semolina.
  7. When it’s time to remove the bagels, use the slotted spoon and place them back on the baking sheet now sprinkled with cornmeal. Add toppings immediately while the bagels are still wet, if you choose to use toppings. Repeat with the second sheet of bagels.
Bake the Bagels
  1. Place both baking sheets of bagels in the preheated oven. Bake for 7 minutes, then switch the pans on the racks and rotate each 180 degrees to bake the bagels as evenly as possible.
  2. After you switch and rotate, lower the oven temperature to 450F / 232C and bake for another 7-8 minutes, or until light golden brown.
  3. Remove from the oven and allow bagels to cool for 15 minutes before devouring.

NOTES:

To keep my scale clean while weighing the dough I place the now-empty bowl (don’t have to clean it, the dough was just in there) and press tare. You can also use a piece of plastic film wrap over the scale and tare if needed. I like to make 6 regular bagels and 12 mini for variety. You can do this by weighing your dough ball and then dividing it in half. Weigh one half and divide this number by 6; then weigh the other half and divide by 12. I love lassoing the bagels while shaping them! Fast, fun, and effective. Not as big a fan of the rope and seal version, I thought it took longer and the finishing ring was not as symmetrical. Try out both versions to find which works best for you! I found it best to make the dough in the evening and boil and bake the bagels in the morning or they over-rose, but I believe this is mostly due to my not-cold-enough fridge. If you have a cold and well functioning fridge, you should be fine to make and bake the bagels at your leisure! When baking the bagels, know your oven. If you have hot spots or a small oven, you can choose to bake one sheet of bagels at a time. Since my oven is small, I baked the first sheet of bagels while I was boiling the second sheet, and simply rotated the pan 180 degrees after the first 7 minutes.

Calories

303.74

Fat (grams)

1.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.22

Carbs (grams)

60.82

Fiber (grams)

2.14

Net carbs

58.68

Sugar (grams)

0.83

Protein (grams)

10.16

Sodium (milligrams)

1017.73

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional Info is Approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator



Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

2019-05-26+17.58.07-2.jpg

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After more than two years in Italy, I have finally made a cheesecake.

Proof that you don’t need a springform pan to bake a cheesecake

Proof that you don’t need a springform pan to bake a cheesecake

Cheesecakes are not hard to make, but the baking is important, probably the most important part, and has always been tricky for me. Cheesecakes are usually baked at a slightly lower temperature, usually around 325F, and just until the sides are set but the center is still jiggly. If the center sets, the cheesecake is over done, but if the center is too jiggly, then your cheesecake won’t set up in the fridge and you’ll end up with soup when you cut into it. You don’t want the cheesecake to crack, and some recipes will tell you to add a bain-marie (a hot water bath) to the oven to keep the atmosphere humid or to crack the oven door after you’ve turned it off so your cheesecake won’t cool down too quickly and yes, crack.

So when you live in Italy with strange ovens, you think twice before baking things when you can’t perfectly control the heat in your oven or where the heat is coming from. IF you’re able to tell the temperature of your oven at all. (I’m thinking of you, my oven two apartments ago. I DO NOT miss you!) Or if your oven is small and cooks things a lot quicker. Add on top of that the cream cheese here, “formaggio fresco” or literally translated fresh cheese, is…different. I’m not even sure what it is, it tastes similar to cream cheese in the States, but when you whip it it doesn’t become soupy like the American stuff, it becomes super creamy. Sometimes I think the American stuff is stickier too, maybe? The only brand here I’ve ever seen is Philadelphia, and it has had great success in Italy. But the cheesecakes I’ve eaten in restaurants or pastry shops? Always weird. They taste and look more like semi-freddo or a mousse. I therefore assumed when I made a cheesecake it would be weird like the other ones I’ve eaten here. So I never made one.

Along came Easter and I wanted to make a cheesecake. I didn’t even have a springform pan but found that pie dishes work pretty great as substitutes. And you know what? The cheesecake turned out delicious and not weird. And my husband and colleagues liked it so well I made the same one again and bought a springform pan. And if you know me, you know I rarely bake the same thing twice in a row. I’m always on to the next new recipe or at least something I haven’t made in a while. But this recipe asked to be made again. And so I did. And now you can make it, too, weird cream cheese or normal cream cheese!

Recipe adapted from omgchocolatedesserts


Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Serves about 12

Ingredients:

For the Oreo Crust

Crushing Oreos the old-fashioned way…

Crushing Oreos the old-fashioned way…

  • 24 Oreos

  • 1/4 cup / 56g butter, melted

For the Filling

  • 7.5 oz / 225g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

  • 24 oz (3 8 oz packages) / 675g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp / 125g granulated sugar

  • 2 Tbsp / 14 g cocoa powder

  • 3 eggs

For the Ganache Topping

  • 3/4 cup / 175g heavy whipping cream

  • 6 oz / 180g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

Directions:

Oven 350F / 177C. Grease an 8in - 9in / 20cm - 24cm springform pan.

Make the Oreo Crust

  1. Chop the Oreos finely, either in a food processor, by crushing with a rolling pin on a clean surface or cutting board, or by putting in a resealable plastic bag and crushing with a rolling pin or meat tenderizer.

  2. If using a food processor, pulse in the melted butter until crumbs are evenly moistened. If crushing the Oreos by hand, transfer to a bowl and stir in the butter.

  3. Press mixture evenly into the bottom of the prepared springform pan and bake for 8 minutes.

  4. Remove from oven and let cool while you prepare the filling.

Make the Filling

Spreading cream cheese mixture over baked crust

Spreading cream cheese mixture over baked crust

  1. In a double boiler or pan over low heat, melt the chocolate, stirring constantly. Remove from heat when there are still small chunks of chocolate, and continue to stir until completely melted. In this way the chocolate won’t overheat or burn. Let chocolate cool.

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl with a handheld mixer, beat cream cheese and sugar on medium speed until smooth. Changing to low speed, carefully beat in cocoa powder so that it doesn’t “poof” everywhere. Every so often stop beating and scrape down the sides of the bowl well.

  3. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until smooth.

  4. Beat in melted and cooled chocolate.

  5. Pour mixture over the crust, smoothing the top.

  6. Bake for 45 - 60 minutes, or until center is still slightly wiggly and the top looks dry.

  7. Turn the oven off and crack open the door for about 10 minutes. Remove cheesecake from oven and place in fridge until completely cooled, 8 hours or overnight.

Make the Ganache Topping

  1. In a small pan place heavy cream and chocolate over low heat. Stir constantly until the mixture is smooth and melted. Allow to cool slightly.

  2. Remove cheesecake from fridge and pour ganache evenly over the top. Allow to set before running a dull knife around the edge of cheesecake and releasing from springform pan. Alternately, if you don’t need to transport the cheesecake anywhere, you can remove the ring of the springform first and then pour the ganache over, using a spoon to guide the ganache toward the edges and allowing some to dribble down the sides.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • Not a dark chocolate fan? Try it out with milk chocolate or a mixture of milk and dark to create your preferred bitterness!

  • If you don’t own a double boiler, you can make a makeshift one by placing a small pan with an inch or so of water in the bottom and bring to a simmer. Place the chocolate in a bowl big enough that it can sit on top of the pan without touching the water. Stir constantly and proceed as in the recipe. This might take a touch more effort than just melting the chocolate in a pan, but it’s safer if you’re not used to melting chocolate so as not to burn it.

  • Powdered sugar can be substituted for the granulated, use 1 cup / 110g.

  • For cleaner slicing, try running your knife under hot water for a few seconds between slices.

American
Yield: 12
Author:

Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Oreo crust, creamy dark chocolate cheesecake filling, and a decadent dark chocolate ganache.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 1 H & 8 Mtotal time: 2 H & 8 M

ingredients:

For the Oreo Crust
  • 24 Oreos
  • 1/4 cup / 56g butter, melted
For the Filling
  • 7.5 oz / 225g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks
  • 24 oz (3 8 oz packages) / 675g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp / 125g granulated sugar
  • 2 Tbsp / 14 g cocoa powder
  • 3 eggs
For the Ganache Topping
  • 3/4 cup / 175g heavy whipping cream
  • 6 oz / 180g dark chocolate, broken into small chunks

instructions:

How to cook Triple Dark Chocolate Cheesecake

Make the Oreo Crust
  1. Preheat oven to 350F / 177C. Grease an 8in - 9in / 20cm - 24cm springform pan.
  2. Chop the Oreos finely, either in a food processor, by crushing with a rolling pin on a clean surface or cutting board, or by putting in a resealable plastic bag and crushing with a rolling pin or meat tenderizer.
  3. If using a food processor, pulse in the melted butter until crumbs are evenly moistened. If crushing the Oreos by hand, transfer to a bowl and stir in the butter.
  4. Press mixture evenly into the bottom of the prepared springform pan and bake for 8 minutes.
  5. Remove from oven and let cool while you prepare the filling.
Make the Filling
  1. In a double boiler or pan over low heat, melt the chocolate, stirring constantly. Remove from heat when there are still small chunks of chocolate, and continue to stir until completely melted. In this way the chocolate won’t overheat or burn. Let chocolate cool.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl with a handheld mixer, beat cream cheese and sugar on medium speed until smooth. Changing to low speed, carefully beat in cocoa powder so that it doesn’t “poof” everywhere. Every so often stop beating and scrape down the sides of the bowl well.
  3. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until smooth.
  4. Beat in melted and cooled chocolate.
  5. Pour mixture over the crust, smoothing the top.
  6. Bake for 45 - 60 minutes, or until center is still slightly wiggly and the top looks dry.
  7. Turn the oven off and crack open the door for about 10 minutes. Remove cheesecake from oven and place in fridge until completely cooled, 8 hours or overnight.
Make the Ganache Topping
  1. In a small pan place heavy cream and chocolate over low heat. Stir constantly until the mixture is smooth and melted. Allow to cool slightly.
  2. Remove cheesecake from fridge and pour ganache evenly over the top. Allow to set before running a dull knife around the edge of cheesecake and releasing from springform pan. Alternately, if you don’t need to transport the cheesecake anywhere, you can remove the ring of the springform first and then pour the ganache over, using a spoon to guide the ganache toward the edges and allowing some to dribble down the sides.

NOTES:

Not a dark chocolate fan? Try it out with milk chocolate or a mixture of milk and dark to create your preferred bitterness! If you don’t own a double boiler, you can make a makeshift one by placing a small pan with an inch or so of water in the bottom and bring to a simmer. Place the chocolate in a bowl big enough that it can sit on top of the pan without touching the water. Stir constantly and proceed as in the recipe. This might take a touch more effort than just melting the chocolate in a pan, but it’s safer if you’re not used to melting chocolate so as not to burn it. Powdered sugar can be substituted for the granulated, use 1 cup / 110g. For cleaner slicing, try running your knife under hot water for a few seconds between slices.

Calories

715.12

Fat (grams)

54.28

Sat. Fat (grams)

31.43

Carbs (grams)

52.73

Fiber (grams)

3.26

Net carbs

49.47

Sugar (grams)

39.29

Protein (grams)

7.29

Sodium (milligrams)

316.65

Cholesterol (grams)

118.98
Nutritional Information is Approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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