NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Going back to the classics.  American classics.  Chocolate chip cookies.  And not just any chocolate chip cookies, chocolate chip cookies the NY Times way.  Want me to say chocolate chip cookies one more time?  Chocolate. Chip. Cookies.  

Why do we need one more chocolate chip cookie recipe floating around?  

When it comes to the kitchen, I'm not one much for routine.  I like to explore, to try and constantly better what it is in my power to improve.  And as I am constantly learning about foods and why ingredients act the way they do, the more I can apply that to recipes.  When you have a classic such as chocolate chip cookies (yes, chocolate chip cookies) it may seem unnecessary to improve upon it.  Chances are, even if your recipe isn't that great, they probably will taste great anyway.  They're pretty hard to mess up.  That's also why there are so many chocolate chip cookie recipes out there.  People are satisfied with "good" when they don't know they're missing out on "great".  

I have three recipes for chocolate chip cookies)that I love, including the one I am about to share with you.  The other two include a classic recipe a.k.a. my mom’s famous chocolate chip cookies, and one with browned butter. You can find that one here.  I'm sure there are more out there that are wonderful.  But for now, I share with you another truly good recipe.  Courtesy of the NY Times, they knew what they were doing with this one.

The recipe includes bread flour and cake flour, lending a wonderful chew and delicate crumb, respectively.

Then there is the long refrigeration, which allows all the ingredients to marry and the flavor to concentrate as the dough dries out every so slightly.

When the cookies are finally baked, the sugar is able to crystallize easier resulting in beautiful golden edges with a center still soft, and an extra caramel nutty flavor.

Even if the refrigeration has to be skipped due to a time constraint, the cookies will still turn out delicious, although I would urge you to try the refrigeration for yourself to taste that extra special result!

Recipe adapted from the NY Times


NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes about 40-70 cookies, depending on size.

Ingredients:

  • 220g / 2 cups cake flour

  • 200g / 1 2/3 cup bread flour

  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking soda

  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking powder

  • 5g / 1 tsp salt

  • 283g / 1 1/4 cups unsalted butter

  • 250g / 1 1/4 cups light brown sugar

  • 225g / 1 generous cup granulated sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • 9g / 2 tsp vanilla extract

  • 566g / 20 oz. 60% bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

  1. Whisk together cake flour, bread flour, baking soda, and baking powder.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter and sugars together until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.  Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.  Add vanilla.  

  3. Add dry ingredients, mixing until just combined.  Carefully incorporate chocolate chips.  You may want to use a spoon as a stand mixer can crush the chocolate chips.  

  4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough for 24-72 hours. 

  5. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.  Scoop cold dough out onto cookie sheets in 1" balls, or desired size.  Sprinkle with a touch of sea salt, if you like.  Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until edges turn a nice golden brown and centers still look a bit soft.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • Why bread and cake flour?  Bread flour has a higher gluten content and lends more crisp and chew to the cookies.  Cake flour is finer and lends a delicate crumb.  

  • If you need these cookies the same day you are making the cookies, the refrigeration is not absolutely essential.  When you place a dough in the fridge, the moisture in the dough is able to be evenly absorbed, then after a time begins to dry out, concentrating the flavors.  Then, when you bake the cookies, the sugar is able to caramelize better.  That is the beautiful golden brown color you see, and nutty flavor you taste.  Also, a cold or refrigerated dough won't spread as much.    

chocolate chips, bread flour, cake flour, NY Times, cookies
Dessert
American
Yield: 40-70 cookies
Author:

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies get a remix with bread flour, cake flour, and the magic trick of refrigeration, resulting in nothing short of amazing cookies.
prep time: 30 Mcook time: 20 Mtotal time: 50 M

ingredients:

  • 220g / 2 cups cake flour
  • 200g / 1 2/3 cup bread flour
  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 6g / 1 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 5g / 1 tsp salt
  • 283g / 1 1/4 cups unsalted butter
  • 250g / 1 1/4 cups light brown sugar
  • 225g / 1 generous cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 9g / 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 566g / 20 oz. 60% bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks

instructions:

How to cook NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

  1. Whisk together cake flour, bread flour, baking soda, and baking powder.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream butter and sugars together until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla.
  3. Add dry ingredients, mixing until just combined. Carefully incorporate chocolate chips. You may want to use a spoon as a stand mixer can crush the chocolate chips.
  4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate dough for 24-72 hours.
  5. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C. Scoop cold dough out onto cookie sheets in 1" balls, or desired size. Sprinkle with a touch of sea salt, if you like. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until edges turn a nice golden brown and centers still look a bit soft.

NOTES:

Why bread and cake flour? Bread flour has a higher gluten content and lends more crisp and chew to the cookies. Cake flour is finer and lends a delicate crumb. If you need these cookies the same day you are making the cookies, the refrigeration is not absolutely essential. When you place a dough in the fridge, the moisture in the dough is able to be evenly absorbed, then after a time begins to dry out, concentrating the flavors. Then, when you bake the cookies, the sugar is able to caramelize better. That is the beautiful golden brown color you see, and nutty flavor you taste. Also, a cold or refrigerated dough won't spread as much.

Calories

235.01

Fat (grams)

13.56

Sat. Fat (grams)

8.26

Carbs (grams)

24.83

Fiber (grams)

2.61

Net carbs

22.22

Sugar (grams)

11.36

Protein (grams)

3.66

Sodium (milligrams)

122.36

Cholesterol (grams)

24.84
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 1 cookie from a 40-cookie batch.
Created using The Recipes Generator