Jeannie's Healthy Breakfast Cookies

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What could be better than a cookie? How about a cookie that’s packed with nutrients and can be eaten anytime, especially for breakfast, guilt free?

I love cookies. They are my go-to when I want to whip up something with limited time, or don’t have much energy for other more entailed desserts. I’m sure this has NOTHING to do with the fact that cookies are also one of my favorite things to eat. It ends up turning into a win-win-win situation because I’m having fun, being productive, get to eat some of the ingredients while baking, get to eat some dough while baking, and BONUS if there is enough dough to actually be baked into cookies! So many wins.

I have to bring up the negative, however, to classic cookie baking. They’re kinda calorific and not very good for you. I’m all for eating cookies for breakfast, but that usually goes along with a sugar crash later on. What to do?

Bake healthy cookies! They have to be delicious of course, and not gross. I have just the recipe for you, made up by my mom many years ago when we needed a portable nutritious breakfast for a trip. This recipe has been in my recipe box ever since as “Jean’s breakfast cookies”, made with many adjustments because the add ins are very versatile depending on your tastes. My mom likes to be called Jeannie (not by her kids of course) so I adapted the title accordingly.

One thing this recipe is not is a taste-alike recipe to say, chocolate chip cookies with a surprise twist that it’s healthy. Nope, these cookies have a satisfyingly healthy look and taste and are upfront about it from the get go. They get positive feedback and recipe requests wherever they go!

The recipe that follows is just one version of many, many possibilities. Just keep in mind that major adjustments may need other adjustments. For example, if you don’t have any honey or maple syrup on hand for the sweetener, you could use raw or regular cane sugar. Substituting a liquid for a dry ingredient, however, will mean you may need more liquid from elsewhere. Maybe add another egg, a bit more oil, or even water until you get a cookie dough consistency once again. Other ideas to make the recipe your own:

  • Use any kind of flour you wish instead of wheat flour. Oat flour, almond flour, coconut flour…I often use wheat germ in place of part of the flour or flaxmeal, usually 1/4 cup.

  • If you want these cookies to be gluten-free, ensure that your oats are gluten-free, and use a gluten-free flour.

  • Change up the spices. Sometimes towards fall I also add a bit of ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Cardamom is also nice.

  • Beyond dried fruit and walnuts, get creative with your add-ins! Just try not to go too far beyond 1 cup, otherwise there might not be enough dough to hold everything together. In the photos on this post I used dried apples, dried cranberries, and walnuts. I’ve also added various combinations of dried cherries, prunes, dried apricots, raisins, dates, dried figs, dried pears, fresh apples, grated coconut, pecans, hazelnuts, dark chocolate, crystallized ginger, and anything else I had on hand!

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Recipe adapted from my mama


Jeannie’s Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Makes about 18-22 cookies

Ingredients:

2019-02-17 14.45.17.jpg
  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive or coconut oil

  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour

  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats

  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped

  • 1/2 apple, diced

  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.

  1. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.

  2. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.

  3. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.

  4. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder.

  • olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil.

  • 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

healthy, nutritious, cookies, gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, dried fruit, apple, fall spices, oats, nuts, coconut, portable
breakfast, dessert, snack
American
Yield: 12-16 cookies
Author:

Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

Healthy cookies packed with nutritious ingredients that make for a great breakfast or anytime snack. Dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and can easily be made gluten-free.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: 10 Mtotal time: 30 M

ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive oil or coconut oil
  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 apple, diced
  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

instructions:

How to cook Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.
  3. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
  4. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.
  5. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

NOTES:

you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder. olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil. 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

Calories

265.40

Fat (grams)

15.87

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.49

Carbs (grams)

27.23

Fiber (grams)

3.34

Net carbs

23.89

Sugar (grams)

9.53

Protein (grams)

5.72

Sodium (milligrams)

188.36

Cholesterol (grams)

31.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2019-02-17+15.36.02.jpg

Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

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Shout out to all my Swedish friends, here's an ode to Semlor!  Do I even know any Swedish people? Do I even know any Swedish-Americans?  Hmmm.  Well, if you know one, or are one, let me know would ya?  I think the most I know about Sweden is what I learned from the American Girl doll Kirsten as a child, they have a pretty blue and yellow flag, and that these buns are delicious.  They take a bit of time to make, unless you have a bread machine, but honestly I love working food with my hands and would take the extra time to mix and knead over a bread machine any day.  However, sometimes practicality or time saving takes place over the therapeutic sensation of kneading bread.  Your call.  But if you choose the bread machine route, you're on your own because I've never operated one.  Sorry 'bout ya.  My roommate used to have one and she made it look so easy that I'm sure you could translate this recipe for a bread recipe easily without my help.  

These buns, as I've read, are traditionally associated with Lent and eaten on Shrove Tuesday, or Fat Tuesday.  You could think of them as the equivalent to Polish paczki.  If you're thinking, "Wow, thanks, that helps me so much - WHAT is a paczki??" It's similar to a jelly filled doughnut traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday and pronounced poonch-key.  Also delicious.  There is quite a large Polish population near where I grew up, including an annual Polka Fest!  Plenty of polka-ing and beer to go around.  Anyway, Semlor is also eaten in various forms and under other names in other Nordic countries such as Finland, Estonia, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania, Latvia, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands.  Let's stick to Swedish Semlor, shall we? 

Recipe adapted from LondonEats


Semlor

Makes 10 buns

Ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns

  • 1 cup / 237g milk

  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter

  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt

  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom

  • 2 eggs

  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour

  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream

For the Marzipan Filling

  • insides of the buns

  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream

  • powdered sugar, for dusting

Directions:

Make the Cardamom Buns

Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.

  1. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer.  Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt.  Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.  

  2. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle.  Beat until all ingredients are incorporated.  Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms.  Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed.  You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom.  If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.  

  3. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more.  Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls.  Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.   

  4. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.

  5. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.  

  6. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.  

Make the Marzipan Filling

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside.  Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl.  Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can.  Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.  

Assembly

  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.  

  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine.

  • If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was.

  • When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass.

  • I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

  • "Semlor" is plural, so if you would like to eat only one bun, ask for a "Semla."

semla,semlor,cardamom buns,marzipan filling,swedish buns
Nordic
Yield: 10
Author:

Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Sweet cardamom buns with a creamy marzipan filling and whipped cream topping.
prep time: 1 H & 20 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 1 H & 35 M

ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns
  • 1 cup / 237g milk
  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter
  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt
  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour
  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream
For the Marzipan Filling
  • insides of the buns
  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream
  • powdered sugar, for dusting

instructions:

How to cook Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Make the Cardamom Buns
  1. Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.
  2. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer. Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt. Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.
  3. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle. Beat until all ingredients are incorporated. Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms. Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed. You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom. If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.
  4. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more. Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls. Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  5. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.
  6. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.
  7. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.
Make the Marzipan Filling
  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside. Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl. Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can. Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.
Assembly
  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.
  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.

NOTES:

I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine. If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was. When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass. I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

Calories

436.24

Fat (grams)

19.78

Sat. Fat (grams)

10.76

Carbs (grams)

56.25

Fiber (grams)

1.82

Net carbs

54.43

Sugar (grams)

18.41

Protein (grams)

9.08

Sodium (milligrams)

149.19

Cholesterol (grams)

84.19
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Chia Persimmon Pudding (Vegan)

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

I had never eaten a persimmon before living in Italy.  I probably couldn't have even picked it out from a line up of fruit.  But if you asked me, of course I would want to try a persimmon!  I had heard good things about them, especially the elusive "persimmon pudding."  

I used to go the market several times a week for my fruit and vegetables, one of my favorite weekly errands.  It was a large market, the ground floor of the Mercato Centrale if you’ve been there, with lots of vendors, but there was this dear old man that always had the best tomatoes and lettuce.  He would say "Ciao, bella," shake my hand, and always round the price down for me.  He also had this habit of sneaking in a fruit or vegetable that I hadn't ordered.  Whether that was a sweet gesture or a marketing strategy, I may never know.  One day, after getting my usual tomatoes, I arrived home to find this strange object that looked curiously like an orange tomato, but was most definitely not.  So....squishy and lacking that earthy, pungent, tomato vine smell.  After a little research, I found I had in my possession a kaki!  Okay, now what is a kaki?  

After a little more research, I found that kaki is what the Italians call persimmons. Sweet, mysterious persimmons.  Now...how to eat it?  I quickly realized they are like jelly on the inside when ripe, and it's only the skin that holds it together.  If that skin breaks, you have a real mess if you weren't prepared with a bowl or your mouth beneath it.  I ate that first one in hurry, before it all dripped from my hands onto the floor. 

From then on I bought them in packs and beautiful things happened, including various versions of persimmon pudding.  Below is a raw and vegan version of the Persimmon Pudding.  Makes for a great dessert, snack, or breakfast!  Kaki on.  

Recipe adapted from Blissful Basil.


*Note: Make the Chia Pudding the day before you want to eat the pudding, as it takes at least 8 hours to set up.  

Chia Persimmon Pudding

Serves 4

Ingredients:

For the Chia Pudding Layer

  • 2 cups / 474g unsweetened coconut milk or milk of choice

  • generous 1/2 cup / 90g chia seeds

  • 3 Tbsp / 60g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 tsp / 9g vanilla extract

  • 1/2 tsp / 1g cinnamon

  • pinch of cardamom

For the Persimmon Pudding Layer

  • 3 ripe persimmons

  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

Directions:

You’ll need 4 small (about 12 oz), clear glasses or bowls.

Make the Chia Pudding

  1. In a medium bowl whisk together milk, chia seeds, maple syrup, vanilla, cinnamon, and cardamom.  

  2. Cover and refrigerate overnight or at least 8 hours.  

Make the Persimmon Pudding

  1. Remove the stems from the persimmons and place in a food processor or blender.  Add the cinnamon and blend until smooth.  

  2. Spoon about scant 1/4 cup Persimmon Pudding into the bottom of each glass.  Top with a scant 1/4 cup Chia Pudding.  Repeat layers until both puddings are gone.  Should make three layers of each, or 6 layers total in each glass. Top with additional cinnamon, if desired.

Jenny's Notes:

  • You'll want your persimmons to be very ripe and very soft all the way through; they should be bursting when you try to remove the stems.

  • Persimmons are a great source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and high in fiber.  

vegan, raw, no bake, chia pudding, persimmon pudding, dairy free, gluten free, refined sugar free
American
Yield: 4
Author:

Chia Persimmon Pudding (Vegan)

Layers of spiced coconut milk chia pudding and juicy persimmons are a simple, vegan, dairy-free, gluten, raw, etc. dessert, breakfast, or snack.
prep time: 15 Mcook time: total time: 15 M

ingredients:

For the Chia Pudding Layer
  • 2 cups / 474g unsweetened coconut milk or milk of choice
  • generous 1/2 cup / 90g chia seeds
  • 3 Tbsp / 60g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 tsp / 9g vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp / 1g cinnamon
  • pinch of cardamom
For the Persimmon Pudding Layer
  • 3 ripe persimmons
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

instructions:

How to cook Chia Persimmon Pudding (Vegan)

Make the Chia Pudding
  1. *Note: Make the Chia Pudding the day before you want to eat the pudding, as it takes at least 8 hours to set up. 
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together milk, chia seeds, maple syrup, vanilla, cinnamon, and cardamom.
  3. Cover and refrigerate overnight or at least 8 hours.
Make the Persimmon Pudding
  1. You’ll need 4 small (about 12 oz), clear glasses or bowls.
  2. Remove the stems from the persimmons and place in a food processor or blender. Add the cinnamon and blend until smooth.
  3. Spoon about scant 1/4 cup Persimmon Pudding into the bottom of each glass. Top with a scant 1/4 cup Chia Pudding. Repeat layers until both puddings are gone. Should make three layers of each, or 6 layers total in each glass. Top with additional cinnamon, if desired.

NOTES:

You'll want your persimmons to be very ripe and very soft all the way through; they should be bursting when you try to remove the stems.

Calories

266.73

Fat (grams)

9.61

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.90

Carbs (grams)

43.72

Fiber (grams)

12.46

Net carbs

35.76

Sugar (grams)

25.11

Protein (grams)

4.73

Sodium (milligrams)

12.43

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Enjoy your Kaki Pudding!