Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

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Buon Ferragosto!

Also known as the day where everything is closed and I feel slightly trapped. Hmmm the gelato place is closed so I’ll just run to the store and pick up some…oh wait, all the grocery stores are closed. Ok, well maybe I’ll go browse some shops, oh wait, all closed. I’ll go walk around in the center for a bit…nope, hardly any buses running today to get to the center. Even if I could find a bus, all the places I could buy a ticket are closed. Ok, so I’ll walk to the gym to work out and enjoy some air conditioning. Ah, closed. So, I hunker down and eat whatever food is in the house, try to stay cool. Actually we’ve come to a bit of a cool spell, today only has a high of 90°F. I’ll take it!

I actually planned ahead this year and went grocery shopping last night. I got fruit and veggies for lunch and dinner today, but why didn’t I get better snackies? But then I remembered that I have a good stash of gelato in the freezer, and made me think of this delectable milkshake I made a few weeks ago.

So with all this time on my hands, I shall be milkshaking and sharing this milkshake with you! What’s so great about this milkshake?

It’s a Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake. That’s such a long name, and kinda going against my own rule of not listing every ingredient in the title, but otherwise I didn’t quite know how to get the dream across, ya know?

How about this: Strawnutelloco Milkshake. Stranucoco Milkshake. Conuterry. Strawconutella. Regardless, this milkshake tastes like a chocolate covered strawberry rolled in coconut with a hint of hazelnut.

I have a confession to make. I originally made this milkshake to try and hide this not-awesome gelato I bought. There was a sale on a brand I had never tried before at the grocery store, and they had coconut and I love coconut but it just did not end well. Icy and so much coconut it was chewy. I didn’t want to waste it, but I also didn’t necessarily want to force myself to eat gelato?

Enter the milkshake idea. I had strawberries, Nutella, and milk, and this beautiful combo was born. The copious amounts of coconut from the gelato still rendered my milkshake a bit chewy, but if you have a GOOD brand of coconut ice cream, or even vanilla ice cream with a bit of flaked coconut and maybe a drop of coconut extract or two thrown in, you’ve got yourself the perfect summer day’s treat.

So thank you, gelato brand that shall remain unnamed, for the not delicious gelato that prompted me to create a delicious milkshake.


Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

Serves 2

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Ingredients:

  • 2 cups coconut ice cream, slightly softened

  • 1/2 cup milk, any variety

  • 1/2 cup hulled strawberries, fresh or frozen

  • 2 heaping Tbsp Nutella

  • Dash of vanilla extract, optional

  • Whipped cream, optional

Directions:

  1. Add all ingredients except whipped cream to a blender and blend until smooth. Check consistency and add more milk if desired.

  2. Spoon into 2 glasses and top with whipped cream. Serve immediately.


Jenny’s Notes:

  • Don’t have coconut ice cream but still want that coconut taste? Substitute chocolate or vanilla ice cream and add a bit of flaked coconut and a drop or two of coconut extract.

  • For creamier shakes, use whole milk.

  • For thinner shakes you can sip, add more milk. For thicker, spoonable shakes, add less milk. Some blenders don’t blend thicker shakes well, so if yours is having problems, either wait a minute or two for the ice cream to soften a bit more before continuing to blend, or add a touch more milk.

  • To make fresh whipped cream, whip about 1/4 cup / 60g heavy whipping cream with 1 Tbsp / 14g sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, or with a handheld mixer. This makes about 1/2 cup fresh whipped cream. Store in fridge, best if used within a few days.

milkshake, milk, strawberry, Nutella, coconut, ice cream, vanilla, fresh whipped cream, dessert, summer
Dessert, Beverage
American
Yield: 2 Servings
Author:

Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

Thick and creamy milkshake with coconut ice cream, Nutella, strawberries and whipped cream on top.
prep time: 5 Mcook time: total time: 5 M

ingredients:

  • 2 cups coconut ice cream, slightly softened
  • 1/2 cup milk, any variety
  • 1/2 cup hulled strawberries, fresh or frozen
  • 2 heaping Tbsp Nutella
  • Dash of vanilla extract, optional
  • Whipped cream, optional

instructions:

How to cook Strawberry Nutella Coconut Milkshake

  1. Add all ingredients except whipped cream to a blender and blend until smooth. Check consistency and add more milk if desired.
  2. Spoon into 2 glasses and top with whipped cream. Serve immediately.

NOTES:

Don’t have coconut ice cream but still want that coconut taste? Substitute chocolate or vanilla ice cream and add a bit of flaked coconut and a drop or two of coconut extract. For creamier shakes, use whole milk. For thinner shakes you can sip, add more milk. For thicker, spoonable shakes, add less milk. Some blenders don’t blend thicker shakes well, so if yours is having problems, either wait a minute or two for the ice cream to soften a bit more before continuing to blend, or add a touch more milk. To make fresh whipped cream, whip about 1/4 cup / 60g heavy whipping cream with 1 Tbsp / 14g sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, or with a handheld mixer. This makes about 1/2 cup fresh whipped cream. Store in fridge, best if used within a few days.

Calories

440.85

Fat (grams)

23.21

Sat. Fat (grams)

19.31

Carbs (grams)

54.51

Fiber (grams)

3.87

Net carbs

50.64

Sugar (grams)

40.58

Protein (grams)

6.95

Sodium (milligrams)

49.23

Cholesterol (grams)

9.42
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 2 servings and includes whipped cream.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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Strawberry Shortcake

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Strawberry shortcake is a summer classic. All you need are juicy, ripe strawberries, shortcakes, which are really just biscuits with a bit of sugar added to them, and whipped cream. If you decided on adding some vanilla ice cream to the mix I don’t think anyone would be mad about it. I certainly wouldn’t be. Did I mention they’re really simple to make?

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It’s so simple because the strawberries are the shining star and don’t need much dressing up. If you try and make this when strawberries are out of season, even if you can find them in the grocery store, it just won’t be the same. This is a dessert that calls for strawberries ripened under the summer sun, bursting with flavor.

Do you want to know a secret? Strawberry shortcakes will reach the pinnacle of their goodness if you are able to pick the strawberries yourself! Not only will you be the one choosing the juiciest berries, but you’ll KNOW they’re as fresh as they come! Plus, you’ll taste the fruits of your own hard work and it makes it that much sweeter. Literally. I loved going strawberry picking with my mom as a kid. Strawberry season in Michigan is always in beginning to mid summer, usually end of June or early July, and we’d come home with baskets full. Then I’d help my mom hull and slice them, keeping some for eating, some for making strawberry shortcake and other desserts, and some for freezing and making jam.

Eat strawberry shortcake for dessert, or breakfast, snack, lunch, and dinner. I mean, biscuits and fruit sounds like a balanced and great way to start off the morning! Plus you’ll want to eat them as much as you can while the strawberry season lasts. A great thing about these is that you can add as little or as much sugar as you want! See notes at bottom of recipe for some ideas.

Recipe from my mama with tweaks from moi.


Strawberry Shortcake

Serves: 8-10

Ingredients:

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For the Macerated Strawberries

  • 4-5 cups strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced

  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste

For the Shortcakes

  • 2 cups / 240g all-purpose flour

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 4 tsp / 19g baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp / 2g salt

  • 1/2 cup / 113g cold butter or scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil

  • 2/3 cup / 158g cold milk or buttermilk

For the Whipped Cream

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste

  • 1 tsp / 4g vanilla extract

Directions:

Oven 450°F / 232°C. Have ready an ungreased baking sheet.

Make the Macerated Strawberries

  1. Place strawberries in a bowl, add sugar, and mash them a bit or a lot, as desired, with a fork or masher. Place in fridge while you prepare the shortcakes.

Make the Shortcakes

  1. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

  2. Cut in butter or oil until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

  3. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in milk. Mix just until most of the flour is moistened, then turn mixture out onto a floured surface.

  4. Knead lightly, up to 10-12 times, until you have a soft but not too sticky dough. Don’t overwork or biscuits will be tough.

  5. Gently pat dough out into a circle about 1in / 2.5cm thick, checking to make sure underneath is still floured well and the dough isn’t sticking.

  6. Using a biscuit cutter or a round glass 2-3in / 5-7cm in diameter, cut out as many biscuits as you can. Place biscuits on baking sheet. Collect the dough scraps and reshape into a ball. Repeat patting into a circle and slicing biscuits until dough is used up. You’ll probably only repeat the cutting process 2-3 times at most, depending on the size of your biscuit cutter.

  7. Bake biscuits in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until risen and lightly golden brown.

Make the Whipped Cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or with a hand mixer, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form.

  2. Add the sugar and vanilla and continue whipping until stiff peaks form.

Assembly

Slice your biscuits open and spoon over strawberries and whipped cream!

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The sugar mixed in with the strawberries is traditional but not absolutely necessary. Although it helps soften the strawberries to lose their juice and create more of a soft sauce, I like it also without adding any sugar, because everything else in this recipe is already a bit sweet. On the other hand, if you love sweet strawberry shortcakes, feel free to up the sugar, it’s completely up to your taste!

  • The biscuit dough might seem too soft at first, but the moment the baking powder starts working and it hits the floured surface it should become very workable. Just be careful not to over work it, a little bit goes a long way.

  • When cutting the biscuits, cut straight down, no twisting, or this can seal the edges and prevent a good rise. You can dip the biscuit cutter in some flour to help prevent any sticking.

  • If you place the biscuits next to each other on the baking sheet they can help each other “climb” up and achieve a nicer rise! I know this feels counterintuitive, but give it a try!

American
Yield: 8-10 servings
Author:

Strawberry Shortcake

Classic strawberry shortcake recipe handed down from my mama. Homemade biscuits, juicy strawberries, and fresh whipped cream assembled together in a summery dessert.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 52 M

ingredients:

For the Macerated Strawberries
  • 4-5 cups strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced
  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste
For the Shortcakes
  • 2 cups / 240g all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 4 tsp / 19g baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp / 2g salt
  • 1/2 cup / 113g cold butter or scant 1/2 cup / 100g oil
  • 2/3 cup / 158g cold milk or buttermilk
For the Whipped Cream
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 3-4 Tbsp / 35-50g sugar or to taste
  • 1 tsp / 4g vanilla extract

instructions:

How to cook Strawberry Shortcake

Make the Macerated Strawberries
  1. Place strawberries in a bowl, add sugar, and mash them a bit or a lot, as desired, with a fork or masher. Place in fridge while you prepare the shortcakes.
Make the Shortcakes
  1. Preheat oven to 450F / 232C. Have ready an ungreased baking sheet.
  2. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Cut in butter or oil until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in milk. Mix just until most of the flour is moistened, then turn mixture out onto a floured surface.
  5. Knead lightly, up to 10-12 times, until you have a soft but not too sticky dough. Don’t overwork or biscuits will be tough.
  6. Gently pat dough out into a circle about 1in / 2.5cm thick, checking to make sure underneath is still floured well and the dough isn’t sticking.
  7. Using a biscuit cutter or a round glass 2-3in / 5-7cm in diameter, cut out as many biscuits as you can. Place biscuits on baking sheet. Collect the dough scraps and reshape into a ball. Repeat patting into a circle and slicing biscuits until dough is used up. You’ll probably only repeat the cutting process 2-3 times at most, depending on the size of your biscuit cutter.
  8. Bake biscuits in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until risen and lightly golden brown.
Make the Whipped Cream
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or with a hand mixer, whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form.
  2. Add the sugar and vanilla and continue whipping until stiff peaks form.
Assembly
  1. Slice your biscuits open and spoon over strawberries and whipped cream!

NOTES:

The sugar mixed in with the strawberries is traditional but not absolutely necessary. Although it helps soften the strawberries to lose their juice and create more of a soft sauce, I like it also without adding any sugar, because everything else in this recipe is already a bit sweet. On the other hand, if you love sweet strawberry shortcakes, feel free to up the sugar, it’s completely up to your taste! The biscuit dough might seem too soft at first, but the moment the baking powder starts working and it hits the floured surface it should become very workable. Just be careful not to over work it, a little bit goes a long way. When cutting the biscuits, cut straight down, no twisting, or this can seal the edges and prevent a good rise. You can dip the biscuit cutter in some flour to help prevent any sticking. If you place the biscuits next to each other on the baking sheet they can help each other “climb” up and achieve a nicer rise! I know this feels counterintuitive, but give it a try!

Calories

436.99

Fat (grams)

24.15

Sat. Fat (grams)

7.94

Carbs (grams)

51.65

Fiber (grams)

2.77

Net carbs

48.88

Sugar (grams)

24.49

Protein (grams)

5.28

Sodium (milligrams)

368.72

Cholesterol (grams)

35.06
Nutritional Information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
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The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

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This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Fluffy? Isn’t key lime pie supposed to be creamy, custardy, silken? Yes! And this recipe is all of those things but with a special touch of fluffiness, thanks to our friends the egg whites. Whipped egg whites. It’s magical. And with Easter just around the corner, this is the perfect dessert to celebrate with! I even gave you two weeks time to plan ahead, aren't I nice?

I don’t know why I always want to make citrus desserts for Easter, maybe because it’s always in the spring. And in the spring everything is coming alive, the rebirth of nature, and calls for bright, happy citrus flavors. You can’t call citrus sad. And what is Easter but the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus, giving those who believe on Him new life? The celebration of rebirth. It all fits. Not to mention if you observe Lent, getting to eat what you gave up for 6 weeks is lovely.

And whether you have a big Easter meal planned or not, you’re going to want to make this pie. And if you’ve never made key lime pie before? This is not a bad place to start. Just be warned that other key lime pies after this one might be…tame.

Recipe adapted from the Williams-Sonoma cookbook Savoring America


The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Serves 8-12

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Ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust

  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)

  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans

  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger

  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon

  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled

For the Filling

  • 4 eggs, separated

  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here

  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice

  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest

  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

For the Topping and Garnish

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar

  • 1/8 tsp almond extract

  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

Directions:

Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.

Make the Gingersnap Crust

  1. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.

  2. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.

Make the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.

  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.

  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.

  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.

  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Make the Topping

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.

  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things!

  • Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice.

  • If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest.

  • No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

American
Yield: 8-12 servings
Author:

The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Classic key lime pie with a twist. Tart filling made extra light and fluffy by whipping the egg whites, a spicy gingersnap crust, and fresh whipped cream.
prep time: 50 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 80 M

ingredients:

For the Gingersnap Crust
  • 28 gingersnaps broken into pieces, about 1 1/2in / 4cm in diameter (homemade or storebought)
  • 1/2 cup / 60g chopped pecans
  • 1 Tbsp / 15g chopped crystallized ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup / 57g butter, melted and cooled
For the Filling
  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 1/4 cup / 30g cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 1 14oz can / 440g sweetened condensed milk, make it homemade here
  • 1/2 cup / 118g key lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp / 12g freshly grated key lime zest
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
For the Topping and Garnish
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup / 42g confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/8 tsp almond extract
  • thin key lime slices or lime zest, optional

instructions:

How to cook The Fluffiest Key Lime Pie with a Gingersnap Crust

Make the Gingersnap Crust
  1. Oven 350F / 177C. Lightly greased 9in / 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a food processor, combine the gingersnaps, pecans, ginger, and cinnamon. Pulse until everything is finely ground in crumbs. Add the butter and pulse briefly until the crumbs are evenly moistened.
  3. Press evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes or until fragrant and lightly browned. (This can be hard to see because of the dark color of the gingersnaps.) Allow to cool.
Make the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat 2 egg whites and the cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form and can hold their shape, about 1-2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and scrape the egg whites into a small bowl; set aside.
  2. In the bowl of the stand mixer (don’t worry about cleaning it), beat on medium-high speed the egg yolks, 2 remaining egg whites, cornstarch, sugar, and sweetened condensed milk until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the lime juice and zest and beat until smooth.
  3. Gently fold 1/3 of the egg white mixture into the lime mixture to lighten. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold just until combined.
  4. Pour the filling into the cooled pie crust, smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until just firm, about 20 minutes. To test for firmness, jiggle the dish slightly. When the center jiggles just slightly, it’s ready.
  5. Cool completely, then cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.
Make the Topping
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream on medium speed. As it starts to thicken (and will no longer splatter) increase the speed to high. Add the powdered sugar and almond extract. Continue beating until firm peaks form, about 2-4 minutes total.
  2. Spoon whipped cream over pie or use a piping bag and tips to decorate. Garnish with lime slices/and or zest. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

NOTES:

The crust can be made without the pecans and/or ginger, if you’re like me and sometimes feel too lazy to chop things! Freshly squeezed key lime juice is best, but if you’ve ever used real key limes you’ll know that getting half a cup can be a real labor of love. Those things can be tiny! Hand cramp hand cramp hand cramp. And just when you think you’re there, you realize you’ve only squeezed 1 Tbsp worth. So, I gladly buy bottled key lime juice. If you can’t find fresh key limes or juice, use limes! And I suppose, lemons if you’re in a pinch. Lemon pies are good too! Same goes for the zest. No food processor handy? Do it the old fashioned way and stick the cookies in a resealable plastic bag and whack and roll with a rolling pin. The pecans and ginger can be finely chopped by hand.

Calories

590.80

Fat (grams)

29.69

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.77

Carbs (grams)

76.33

Fiber (grams)

1.88

Net carbs

74.45

Sugar (grams)

55.81

Protein (grams)

8.28

Sodium (milligrams)

256.68

Cholesterol (grams)

90.75
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2018-12-20 14.14.52-2.jpg



Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

IMG_5063.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Let me take a gander at what you're thinking, probably something like, "OH! PEANUT BUTTER PIE? I love peanut butter pie! So good! But I already have a recipe for peanut butter pie. Why do I need this recipe? Wait, don't YOU already have a recipe up on this blog for peanut butter pie??" Maybe? Well, you'd be right about one thing, this is not my first recipe up for a peanut butter pie.  But let me tell you, they each have their own merited place in your recipe box.  For example, the Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream has a shortbread crust, creamy peanut butter filling, topped with chocolate whipped cream.  Perfect for casual events, potlucks, birthdays, summer evenings, Sunday afternoons...but what happens if you need a peanut butter pie for a gala? The president is coming over?  You're presenting a peanut butter pie to the CEO of Godiva chocolate and want chocolate to be showcased more prominently?  Then you need a peanut butter pie with refinement, elegance, and classy chocolate utilized in more than one element of the pie.  How do you do this without compromising the stand-alone peanut butter filling of a peanut butter pie?  Why, you change out the shortbread crust for a chocolate crust, and top the pie with flowing chocolate ganache.  Elegance.  Refinement.  The chocolate ganache envelopes the peanut butter filling in a tender embrace...still with me?  Ok let's stop dreaming and comparing peanut butter pies and MAKE one!  

Not a fan of chocolate and peanut butter together? Neither is my mom.  That's ok, I still love you.  And because of that, why not head over to this Nutter Butter Pie instead? No chocolate there! 

Recipe adapted from what megan's making.


Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Chocolate Crust

  • 7.5 oz / 210g chocolate graham crackers, teddy grahams, or chocolate shortbread

  • 2 oz / 55g (1/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or mini chips

  • 5 Tbsp / 65g butter, melted

For the Peanut Butter Filling

IMG_5030.JPG
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 8 oz / 227g mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1 cup / 250g peanut butter

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract

For the Chocolate Ganache

  • 4 oz / 110g (2/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or chips

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter

  • 1/2 cup / 118g heavy whipping cream

Directions:

Oven 325°F / 163°C.  Ungreased 9in / 23cm pie dish.  

Make the Chocolate Crust

  1. In a food processor combine chocolate grahams, butter, and chocolate chips.  Pulse until the mixture is uniformly fine crumbs.  Or do it the "old fashioned" way and beat the crumbs to oblivion in a well sealed plastic bag with a rolling pin or other hard object, then mixing in the chocolate and butter in a bowl with a spoon. 

  2. Press evenly into the bottom and sides of pie dish and bake for 8 minutes or until fragrant.  Set aside to cool completely.

Make the Peanut Butter Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, beat the whipping cream until stiff peaks form.  Transfer to another bowl if using a stand mixer and set aside.

  2. Again in the bowl of a stand mixer or a separate bowl with a handheld mixer, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter, sugar, and vanilla until light and fluffy.  

  3. Carefully fold the whipped cream into the peanut butter mixture in three or four parts.  

  4. Spoon the filling over the cooled crust and smooth the top.  Refrigerate to set.  

IMG_5064.JPG

Make the Chocolate Ganache

  1. Place the chocolate and butter in a small bowl.  Heat the cream in a small saucepan over low heat, just until simmering.  The moment you see bubbles remove from heat and pour over chocolate and butter.  Let sit for 1 minute to melt the chocolate, then whisk briskly until smooth and shiny.  

  2. Pour over chilled pie.  If you don't desire chocolate running over the sides, you may have to wait a minute or two between pourings, or simply don't use all the ganache.  (The rest can be disposed of with a spoon and a mouth.  But I don't need to tell you that.)  

  3. Chill for 3-4 hours or overnight until set.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If using a shallow pie dish you may have some leftover crust, and that's ok. Don't feel like you have to use all the crust mixture or you may have an impenetrable crust, especially in the corners.

  • I frequently substitute whole milk or coconut milk for all or part of the cream in ganache, but usually not when it's a topper as it can separate a bit if you don't use all cream. However, one time when making this I only had 1/4 cup cream left for the topping and so added 1/4 cup whole milk, and it made for a beautiful ganache, even as the topper.

  • Top with chocolate chips or chocolate shavings as desired!

American
Yield: 8-12
Author:

Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Chocolate cookie crust, whipped mascarpone peanut butter filling, and chocolate ganache to top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 8 Mtotal time: 1 H & 8 M

ingredients:

For the Chocolate Crust
  • 7.5 oz / 210g chocolate graham crackers, teddy grahams, or chocolate shortbread
  • 2 oz / 55g (1/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or mini chips
  • 5 Tbsp / 65g butter, melted
For the Peanut Butter Filling
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 8 oz / 227g mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup / 250g peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract
For the Chocolate Ganache
  • 4 oz / 110g (2/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or chips
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter
  • 1/2 cup / 118g heavy whipping cream

instructions:

How to cook Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Make the Chocolate Crust
  1. Oven 325°F / 163°C. Ungreased 9in / 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a food processor combine chocolate grahams, butter, and chocolate chips. Pulse until the mixture is uniformly fine crumbs. Or do it the "old fashioned" way and beat the crumbs to oblivion in a well sealed plastic bag with a rolling pin or other hard object, then mixing in the chocolate and butter in a bowl with a spoon.
  3. Press evenly into the bottom and sides of pie dish and bake for 8 minutes or until fragrant. Set aside to cool completely.
Make the Peanut Butter Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, beat the whipping cream until stiff peaks form. Transfer to another bowl if using a stand mixer and set aside.
  2. Again in the bowl of a stand mixer or a separate bowl with a handheld mixer, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter, sugar, and vanilla until light and fluffy.
  3. Carefully fold the whipped cream into the peanut butter mixture in three or four parts.
  4. Spoon the filling over the cooled crust and smooth the top. Refrigerate to set.
Make the Chocolate Ganache
  1. Place the chocolate and butter in a small bowl. Heat the cream in a small saucepan over low heat, just until simmering. The moment you see bubbles remove from heat and pour over chocolate and butter. Let sit for 1 minute to melt the chocolate, then whisk briskly until smooth and shiny.
  2. Pour over chilled pie. If you don't desire chocolate running over the sides, you may have to wait a minute or two between pourings, or simply don't use all the ganache. (The rest can be disposed of with a spoon and a mouth. But I don't need to tell you that.)
  3. Chill for 3-4 hours or overnight until set.

NOTES:

If using a shallow pie dish you may have some leftover crust, and that's ok. Don't feel like you have to use all the crust mixture or you may have an impenetrable crust, especially in the corners. I frequently substitute whole milk or coconut milk for all or part of the cream in ganache, but usually not when it's a topper as it can separate a bit if you don't use all cream. However, one time when making this I only had 1/4 cup cream left for the topping and so added 1/4 cup whole milk, and it made for a beautiful ganache, even as the topper. Top with chocolate chips or chocolate shavings as desired!

Calories

791.91

Fat (grams)

62.46

Sat. Fat (grams)

30.79

Carbs (grams)

54.43

Fiber (grams)

3.89

Net carbs

50.53

Sugar (grams)

37.64

Protein (grams)

12.12

Sodium (milligrams)

502.22

Cholesterol (grams)

110.56
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_5066.JPG

 

Caramel Cream Pie

2017-12-23+15.32.59.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Fellow citizens of the webs, I've missed you!  It's been a dreadfully long time since I've posted a new recipe.  Not that I haven't been baking, oh no, but going home for Christmas, festivities, and general merry-making have kept me quite occupied.  It has been difficult to find the time to carve out a window of several hours not only to bake something blog-worthy, but photograph said something, upload photos, edit photos, write the nonsense that is what you are currently reading, type up the recipe, add finished photos, proof read, and post the now finished blog form.  It's quite the process for something that is merely a hobby (yes, I don't in any way, shape, or form get paid for this, enjoy your ad-free recipes!!!) and even though I enjoy the blogging process, sometimes I don't feel that good at any of it.  Except the baking, that's the one thing I feel somewhat competent in.  And even then, there are definitely off days, off recipes, or off concentration.  And I think to myself, does the world need one more baking blog?  One that's, well, not fantastic?  (At least not yet, mwahaha.)  There are so many great ones out there.  But I think the blogs that inspire me the most, the ones that come across as fantastic, are the ones that are passionate about what they do.  Yes, they have picture-perfect photography, reliable recipes, and witty writing, (hey, look at all those alliterations!), but I don't think they all started that way.  How did they arrive there?  Passion, dedication, perseverance, and always looking for ways to improve, I think. 

The world has enough perceived perfection, what we need are those hungry to learn, with a little talent and a lot of humility, and who are then willing to share what they've learned.  I can only hope, in this tidbit of a clumsy blog, that you'd join me in this voyage of discovering and learning, average photography, and lots of good food.  Oh, and feedback and questions are always welcome, that’s what the comments are for below!

Here's to a bright and shiny new year! 

Now, back to that good food we were talking about...

Recipe adapted from Shugary Sweets


Caramel Cream Pie

2017-12-23+15.34.15.jpg

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Crust

  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt

  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into small pieces

  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water

For the Caramel Cream filling and topping

  • 1 14oz can / 380g dulche de leche, your favorite caramel, or 1/2 recipe of this Caramel Sauce

  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 2 1/2 cups / 605g heavy whipping cream

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

Directions:

Make the Crust

Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish. 

IMG_4555.JPG
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt.  Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands.  You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas. 

  2. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible.  The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet.  Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.  

  3. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly.  Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.  

  4. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat.  Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls.  Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.  

  5. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork.  Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork.  The crust can also be refrigerated at this point, if needed.  

  6. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown.  Cool completely.  

Make the Caramel Cream filling and topping

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese with 1/2 cup / 120g caramel.  Set aside.

  2. In the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat whipping cream and sugar until stiff peaks form.  Reserve 1/2 cup for the topping.  Fold the remaining whipped cream into cream cheese mixture, about a quarter at a time.  

  3. Reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the remaining caramel for the topping.  Spread the rest into the bottom of the crust.  Spread cream cheese mixture over caramel.  

  4. Top pie with reserved 1/2 cup whipped cream and caramel, using a spoon or piping desired.

Jenny's Notes:

  • For the crust, you can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency.  Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough.  You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be.  The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax.  

  • If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking.  

  • I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter.  If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7.  Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.   

American
Yield: 8-12 servings
Author:

Caramel Cream Pie

Flaky, buttery crust, whipped caramel filling, and fresh whipped cream with caramel drizzled on top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 12 Mtotal time: 1 H & 12 M

ingredients:

For the Crust
  • 1 1/3 cup / 160g all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp / 2.5g salt
  • 4 Tbsp / 56g butter, cold, cut into small pieces
  • 4-6 Tbsp / 59 - 89g ice water
For the Caramel Cream filling and topping
  • 1 14oz can / 380g dulche de leche, your favorite caramel, or 1/2 recipe of this Caramel Sauce
  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 1/2 cups / 605g heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

instructions:

How to cook Caramel Cream Pie

Make the Crust
  1. Oven 425°F / 220°C. Ungreased 8 - 9in / 20 - 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together flour and salt. Blend in cold butter using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands. You want the butter to end up in small pieces, like peas.
  3. Add the ice water, starting with 4 Tbsp / 59g, mixing as little as possible. The dough should be able to hold together in a ball, without being too dry and shaggy or too wet. Add more water if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time.
  4. Place dough on a piece of plastic wrap, shape into a disc, and wrap tightly. Place in the fridge for 1 - 48 hours.
  5. After the crust has rested, roll into a circle on a lightly floured surface or silpat. Roll a few times with your rolling pin in one direction before turning the crust 45° (quarter turn) and continuing with a few more rolls. Periodically check under the crust to make sure it isn’t sticking and sprinkling more flour if needed. Continue like this until your crust is nicely round and roughly 2in / 5cm larger than your pie dish.
  6. Carefully transfer crust to pie dish (this is easier if using a silpat), trim the excess overhang if necessary, and fold the ends under. Crimp as desired, or press with a fork. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork. The crust can also be refrigerated at this point, if needed.
  7. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, or until crust is lightly golden-brown. Cool completely.
Make the Caramel Cream filling and topping
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese with 1/2 cup / 120g caramel. Set aside.
  2. In the clean bowl of a stand mixer, beat whipping cream and sugar until stiff peaks form. Reserve 1/2 cup for the topping. Fold the remaining whipped cream into cream cheese mixture, about a quarter at a time.
  3. Reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the remaining caramel for the topping. Spread the rest into the bottom of the crust. Spread cream cheese mixture over caramel.
  4. Top pie with reserved 1/2 cup whipped cream and caramel, using a spoon or piping desired.

NOTES:

For the crust, you can also use a food processor, pulsing in the butter until it has the desired consistency. Just be sure to remove the dough from the food processor and mix in the water with a fork or pastry cutter so you don't overwork the dough. You want to work it as little as possible once you add the water. The liquid helps to awaken the gluten, and the more you work it and the gluten strands develop, the tougher your crust will be. The minimum of 1 hour rest in the fridge allows what gluten inevitably developed to relax. If you are having problems with a shrinking crust, try using a metal or ceramic pie dish and allowing the crust more time to rest before baking. I have made this pie several times over the past year, and have always needed all 6 tablespoons of water, possibly because it was always during the dry winter. If you live in a really dry climate, you might need up to 7. Just be aware, an overly wet crust is more likely to glue itself to the pan during baking.

Calories

652.74

Fat (grams)

42.84

Sat. Fat (grams)

26.73

Carbs (grams)

56.39

Fiber (grams)

0.54

Net carbs

55.85

Sugar (grams)

40.81

Protein (grams)

6.75

Sodium (milligrams)

437.41

Cholesterol (grams)

128.91
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
And yet, for as many times as I've made this pie, I've yet to get a photo of it sliced. Oh well, there's butter, caramel, and whipped cream, what more do you need to know?

And yet, for as many times as I've made this pie, I've yet to get a photo of it sliced. Oh well, there's butter, caramel, and whipped cream, what more do you need to know?


Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

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Shout out to all my Swedish friends, here's an ode to Semlor!  Do I even know any Swedish people? Do I even know any Swedish-Americans?  Hmmm.  Well, if you know one, or are one, let me know would ya?  I think the most I know about Sweden is what I learned from the American Girl doll Kirsten as a child, they have a pretty blue and yellow flag, and that these buns are delicious.  They take a bit of time to make, unless you have a bread machine, but honestly I love working food with my hands and would take the extra time to mix and knead over a bread machine any day.  However, sometimes practicality or time saving takes place over the therapeutic sensation of kneading bread.  Your call.  But if you choose the bread machine route, you're on your own because I've never operated one.  Sorry 'bout ya.  My roommate used to have one and she made it look so easy that I'm sure you could translate this recipe for a bread recipe easily without my help.  

These buns, as I've read, are traditionally associated with Lent and eaten on Shrove Tuesday, or Fat Tuesday.  You could think of them as the equivalent to Polish paczki.  If you're thinking, "Wow, thanks, that helps me so much - WHAT is a paczki??" It's similar to a jelly filled doughnut traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday and pronounced poonch-key.  Also delicious.  There is quite a large Polish population near where I grew up, including an annual Polka Fest!  Plenty of polka-ing and beer to go around.  Anyway, Semlor is also eaten in various forms and under other names in other Nordic countries such as Finland, Estonia, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania, Latvia, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands.  Let's stick to Swedish Semlor, shall we? 

Recipe adapted from LondonEats


Semlor

Makes 10 buns

Ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns

  • 1 cup / 237g milk

  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter

  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt

  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom

  • 2 eggs

  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour

  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream

For the Marzipan Filling

  • insides of the buns

  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream

  • powdered sugar, for dusting

Directions:

Make the Cardamom Buns

Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.

  1. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer.  Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt.  Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.  

  2. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle.  Beat until all ingredients are incorporated.  Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms.  Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed.  You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom.  If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.  

  3. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more.  Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls.  Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.   

  4. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.

  5. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.  

  6. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.  

Make the Marzipan Filling

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside.  Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl.  Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can.  Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.  

Assembly

  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.  

  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine.

  • If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was.

  • When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass.

  • I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

  • "Semlor" is plural, so if you would like to eat only one bun, ask for a "Semla."

semla,semlor,cardamom buns,marzipan filling,swedish buns
Nordic
Yield: 10
Author:

Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Sweet cardamom buns with a creamy marzipan filling and whipped cream topping.
prep time: 1 H & 20 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 1 H & 35 M

ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns
  • 1 cup / 237g milk
  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter
  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt
  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour
  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream
For the Marzipan Filling
  • insides of the buns
  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream
  • powdered sugar, for dusting

instructions:

How to cook Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Make the Cardamom Buns
  1. Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.
  2. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer. Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt. Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.
  3. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle. Beat until all ingredients are incorporated. Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms. Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed. You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom. If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.
  4. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more. Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls. Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  5. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.
  6. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.
  7. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.
Make the Marzipan Filling
  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside. Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl. Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can. Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.
Assembly
  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.
  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.

NOTES:

I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine. If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was. When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass. I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

Calories

436.24

Fat (grams)

19.78

Sat. Fat (grams)

10.76

Carbs (grams)

56.25

Fiber (grams)

1.82

Net carbs

54.43

Sugar (grams)

18.41

Protein (grams)

9.08

Sodium (milligrams)

149.19

Cholesterol (grams)

84.19
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

DSC_0185.jpg

Happy Thanksgiving!  I am thankful for so many things.  One of those things is cheesecake. 

Especially a caramel cheesecake with a layer of chocolate between the crust and cheesecake, toffee bits, whipped cream, and more caramel drizzled on top. Yep, especially that.

I love the graham cracker crust because it stays together so well! The secret is to use toffee bits in the crust. Toffee is sticky and while the crust is baking all the little pieces melt a bit, fusing the graham cracker crust together into a beautiful, slightly crunchy mass. No crumbling graham cracker crusts today! I mean, I even pressed the crust all the way up the sides of the pan and it stayed even after taking off the spring form pan. Success.

You know how they say actions speak louder than words?  Well, instead of talking about how much I love cheesecake and how great this crust is, I'm going to share the recipe with you...that's an action, right?  Then in turn you can make it, and then you acted on your thankfulness too.  This is such a great plan, let's go! 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from Yammie’s Noshery


Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

Serves about 16-20

Ingredients:

For the Toffee Crust

  • 3 cups / 255g crushed graham crackers, about 2 packages or 18 sheets

  • 1/2 cup / 85g toffee bits, plain or with chocolate (Heath Bits O Brickle)

  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar

  • 1 cup / 226g butter, melted

  • 6 oz / 170g bitter-sweet chocolate, chopped

For the Filling

  • 3 8oz packages / 675g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1 cup / 245g sour cream

  • 1 cup / 200g sugar

  • 1 Tbsp / 15g vanilla extract

  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce (To make homemade caramel, halve this recipe here)

  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten

For the Topping

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup or sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce

  • 1/4 cup / 43g toffee bits

Directions:

Oven 300°F / 149°C.  10in / 26cm spring-form pan lined with parchment paper, bottom and sides.

Make the Toffee Crust

  1. Combine graham crackers, toffee, brown sugar, and butter.  Press firmly into the prepared spring-form pan, pressing all the way up the sides.  Sprinkle chopped chocolate evenly over bottom of crust. 

  2. Bake for 5 minutes or until chocolate is melted.  Remove from oven and spread chocolate evenly with a spatula.  Place crust in freezer while you make the filling.

Make the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese, sour cream, and sugar on low-medium speed for a few minutes.  Add vanilla and caramel.  Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until just combined. 

  2. Pour over crust and bake for about 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until edges are set and center is still a bit jiggly when lightly shaken. 

  3. Turn off oven and crack open the door, leaving cheesecake to set for another 30 minutes.  Remove from oven and allow to cool for a further 30 minutes.

  4. Refrigerate until completely chilled, about 6 hours or overnight.

Make the Topping

  1. When cheesecake is ready, beat whipping cream in the bowl of a stand mixer until soft peaks form.  Add maple syrup and beat until stiff peaks form. 

  2. Pipe whipped cream onto cheesecake, or if you don't have piping bags or tips, simply spread it with a spatula. 

  3. Warm caramel in a small saucepan and drizzle all over the cheesecake with a spoon or spatula.  Sprinkle with toffee and chill until ready to serve.

Jenny's Notes:

  • Cheesecakes require a decent amount of beating, however, avoid beating on high speeds as you don't want to incorporate too much air into the batter. 

  • You can also use an 8in / 20cm spring-form pan + a 6in / 15cm spring-form pan to make this recipe. Or, instead of the 6 incher just stick any extra crust in the bottom of a square baking dish, top with lefotver filling and you have cheesecake bars! I have done the second option before. :) The bars will bake for less time than a spring-form pan.

caramel, toffee crunch, Heath, Bits O Brickle, cheesecake, homemade caramel, chocolate, graham cracker crust
dessert
American
Yield: 16-20 servings
Author:

Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

Toffee graham gracker crust, a layer of dark chocolate, caramel cheesecake filling, and whipped cream, caramel, and more toffee bits on top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 1 H & 55 Mtotal time: 2 H & 55 M

ingredients:

For the Toffee Crust
  • 3 cups / 255g crushed graham crackers, about 2 packages or 18 sheets
  • 1/2 cup / 85g toffee bits, plain or with chocolate
  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar
  • 1 cup / 226g butter, melted
  • 6 oz / 170g bitter-sweet chocolate, chopped
For the Filling
  • 3 8oz packages / 675g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup / 245g sour cream
  • 1 cup / 200g sugar
  • 1 Tbsp / 15g vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce (To make homemade caramel, halve this recipe here)
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
For the Topping
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup or sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce
  • 1/4 cup / 43g toffee bits

instructions:

How to cook Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

  1. Oven 300°F / 149°C. 10in / 26cm spring-form pan lined with parchment paper, bottom and sides.
Make the Toffee Crust
  1. Combine graham crackers, toffee, brown sugar, and butter. Press firmly into the prepared spring-form pan, pressing all the way up the sides. Sprinkle chopped chocolate evenly over bottom of crust.
  2. Bake for 5 minutes or until chocolate is melted. Remove from oven and spread chocolate evenly with a spatula. Place crust in freezer while you make the filling.
Make the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese, sour cream, and sugar on low-medium speed for a few minutes. Add vanilla and caramel. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until just combined.
  2. Pour over crust and bake for about 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until edges are set and center is still a bit jiggly when lightly shaken.
  3. Turn off oven and crack open the door, leaving cheesecake to set for another 30 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool for a further 30 minutes.
  4. Refrigerate until completely chilled, about 6 hours or overnight.
Make the Topping
  1. When cheesecake is ready, beat whipping cream in the bowl of a stand mixer until soft peaks form. Add maple syrup and beat until stiff peaks form.
  2. Pipe whipped cream onto cheesecake, or if you don't have piping bags or tips, simply spread it with a spatula.
  3. Warm caramel in a small saucepan and drizzle all over the cheesecake with a spoon or spatula. Sprinkle with toffee and chill until ready to serve.

NOTES:

Cheesecakes require a decent amount of beating, however, avoid beating on high speeds as you don't want to incorporate too much air into the batter. You can also use an 8in / 20cm spring-form pan + a 6in / 15cm spring-form pan to make this recipe. Or, instead of the 6 incher just stick any extra crust in the bottom of a square baking dish, top with lefotver filling and you have cheesecake bars! I have done the second option before. :) The bars will bake for less time than a spring-form pan.

Calories

619.24

Fat (grams)

42.95

Sat. Fat (grams)

25.01

Carbs (grams)

53.18

Fiber (grams)

0.90

Net carbs

52.27

Sugar (grams)

42.62

Protein (grams)

7.17

Sodium (milligrams)

376.36

Cholesterol (grams)

156.01
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 16 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream

Shortbread crust.  A layer of creamy peanut butter filling.  Topped with a mountain of chocolate whipped cream.  And chocolate shavings.  Because, we're so fancy, you already know.  Did I mention No-Bake?

I first made this pie with a pretzel crust.  The salty sweetness really off-set the creamy full-bodied mouth feel of the layers well.  Yes, sometimes I describe dessert and food like wine.  It just works so well.  But if you ever catch me saying "I prefer the '98 vintage of this cheesecake" or something along that line, I might have taken it too far.  Ew, rancid cheesecake.  Anyway...

The next time I made this pie was in Italy.  Pretzels do exist here, but they have a very strange texture.  Think pretzels that went stale and chewy and then got so stale they got crispy again, almost. But still a little chewy.  And don't chop well in a food processor. It took over 8 minutes to get them partly broken up.  The crust was still good, but it looked more like a bird's nest of pretzel sticks than a uniform crust.  

Oh hey, Thanksgiving pie.  And there is Lucia the poinsettia in the background.  Good times, good times.

Oh hey, Thanksgiving pie.  And there is Lucia the poinsettia in the background.  Good times, good times.

Regardless, all the Americans in Italy are so peanut butter deprived that everyone loved it.  In fact, two days later was Thanksgiving and it was requested of me to make and bring this pie to Thanksgiving dinner.  Not pecan pie.  Not pumpkin pie.  Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream.  With a delicious but slightly strange looking crust.  

When I made the pie this time, I used shortbread cookies with great success.  The Italian supermarkets have practically a whole aisle devoted to all their different kinds of shortbread cookies, called frollini.  A nice big 800g bag for 1.5-2.5 euros?  Hehe don't mind if I do.  Shortbread with cream, with chocolate and stars, with buckwheat, with almond, with almond and chocolate, with hazelnut, stuffed with apricot, stuffed with chocolate, with coarse sugar, with egg, chocolate drops...just to name a few. 

Someday I will share with you the pretzel crust, but when I have access again to pretzels that behave in a food processor and get can get some decent photos.  But until then, get your hands on some shortbread cookies.  You could make some homemade (classic shortbread consists of just 3 ingredients: flour, butter, sugar) or if you're in the States buy some Sandie's shortbread cookies or something similar. 

Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream

Ingredients:

For the Shortbread Crust

  • 15 shortbread cookies
  • 4 Tbsp butter, melted

For the Peanut Butter Filling

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar

For the Chocolate Whipped Cream

  • 100g or roughly 4 oz good quality dark chocolate, chopped
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • Extra chocolate in bar form, for chocolate shavings

Directions:

Make the Chocolate Whipped Cream First

Place a small amount of water in a pan and place on the stove over low heat.  Place chocolate and whipping cream in a bowl that will rest on the pan but without touching the water.  This is a make shift double-boiler.  Feel free to use a real double boiler if you have one. 

Gently stir until chocolate is mostly melted.  Remove from heat and continue stirring until chocolate is completely melted.  Place in the refrigerator for 2 hours. 

Make the Shortbread Crust

In a food processor, pulse cookies until they become crumbly.  Add butter and pulse until smooth and can be pressed into a crust.  Depending on the type of cookies you chose to use, you may need to add a touch more melted butter to ensure the crust will stay together.  Press into a 9 in pie plate and refrigerate.

Make the Peanut Butter Filling

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, whip heavy cream until stiff peaks form.  Transfer to another bowl. 

Again, in the bowl of the stand mixer beat mascarpone, peanut butter, and brown sugar together until smooth.  Gently fold in the whipped cream with a spatula.  Pour filling over crust and return to the refrigerator. 

Assembly

Once the chocolate cream is cooled, beat with a stand mixer or handheld mixer until stiff peaks form.  Remove pie from the refrigerator and spread or pipe chocolate whipped cream over the top. 

Using a vegetable peeler or knife, shave a chocolate bar over the pie for the finishing touch. 

Jenny's Notes:

Try using Nutella or Biscoff spread instead of peanut butter.  YUM.

Adapted from Cooking Channel

Peanut Butter Brownie Trifle

Yes, a trifle, not a truffle.  It is neither a chocolate truffle nor does it require pigs or dogs to dig it up, thankfully.  Although I personally would love to go truffle hunting, or more or less watch the pigs/dogs truffle hunt.  Then eat them, of course.  The truffles, not the dogs/pigs.  This is getting out of hand.

What's the difference between a truffle, a truffle, and a trifle?  The original truffle, or as I will call it here, is the fungus found in the ground.  There are two main kinds: black and white.  They are difficult to find, hence the need for dogs and pigs, and very expensive.  And divine to eat.  If you haven't eaten one, you definitely should, even if just to say you have.  All your foodie friends will hold you in high esteem henceforth.  ;)

Then there is the chocolate truffle, which is essentially a chocolate confection made to look like the original truffle.  It usually consists of a ganache (chocolate melted with heavy cream) center, covered in chocolate.  Also delicious. 

Thirdly, the trifle.  It is originally an English dessert, you could think of it like a large parfait to share.  My mom calls it a "Dump Cake" and in the south it is called a "Husband's Delight."  It usually consists of layers of cake, custard or pudding, whipped cream, and various fruits.  The possibilities of flavors and combinations are endless, and yes, delicious.

The moral of the story is, if someone offers you a truffle, a truffle, or a trifle, always say yes.  Because they are all delicious.  Now let's make a brownie trifle.

Peanut Butter Brownie Trifle

Serves about 12

Ingredients:

For the Vanilla Pudding *Make this first*

  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 Tbsp + 1 1/2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 1/4 cups cold milk
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

For the Peanut Butter Chip Brownies

  • 5 Tbsp oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 of a 10 oz package peanut butter chips

Extras

  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream, whipped until stiff peaks form
  • 1 package (about 12 oz) mini Reese's cups, each cut in half

 

Directions:

Make the Vanilla Pudding

In a small saucepan, whisk together sugar, cornstarch, and salt.  Gradually whisk in milk. 

Heat over medium-low heat until pudding thickens and the whisk leaves a trail.  Remove from heat and add vanilla.  Place in fridge or freezer until pudding is thick and set. 

Meanwhile,

Make the Peanut Butter Chip Brownies

Oven 350 Fahrenheit. 

In a medium bowl, mix together oil, sugar, eggs, and vanilla. 

In a separate bowl, whisk together cocoa, flour, and salt.  Stir dry mixture into wet mixture.  Stir in peanut butter chips.  Pour into a lightly greased 8x8 baking dish.

Bake for 12 - 15 minutes or until toothpick inserted off center comes out mostly clean.  Allow to cool. 

Assembly

Once pudding is set, mix in peanut butter.  Gently fold in whipped cream.

Cut cooled brownies into bite size pieces, about 1-inch squares.

In a large glass bowl, preferably a cylinder, layer a 1/3 of the brownies.  Place 1/4 of the Reese's cups over the brownies.  Spoon 1/3 of the pudding mixture over the Reese's cups.  Repeat layers two more times, finishing with the pudding.  Place remaining 1/4 of Reese's cups on the top.  Chill until ready serve.

IMG_4139.JPG

Adapted from Taste of Home

Nutter Butter Pie

Who doesn't love Nutter Butter cookies?  They remind me of chocolate fondue and my Aunt Cathy.  My mom didn't buy them growing up so I never really knew what I was missing out on.  Except when we would go over my aunt's house and on the special occasion when a fondue was involved for a holiday or bonfire, she always had Nutter Butters as one of the dipping tools.  And they were my favorite.  Are my favorite.  Whatever, they're peanut butter cookies.  #inmyeyesyoudonowrong.  I don't even think we had fondue that much, but there must have been one glorious time with Nutter Butters, and the rest is history.  Anyway, moral of the story is, Nutter Butters are delicious.  This pie really lets them shine through, with most of the flavor and sweetness coming from the cookies themselves. 

Nutter Butter Pie

Ingredients:

For the crust

  • 20 Nutter Butter cookies
  • 5 Tbsp butter, melted

For the filling

  • 8 oz cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup marshmallow fluff
  • 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 12 Nutter Butter cookies, crushed

For the topping

  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp powdered sugar

For the drizzle

  • 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter

Directions:

Make the crust

Oven 350 Fahrenheit.

In a food processor pulse the Nutter Butter cookies until mostly fine crumbs.  Add the butter and pulse until thoroughly combined.  Press firmly into the bottom and up the sides of a 9 in pie pan.  Bake for 10-12 minutes or until edges start to turn golden.  Allow to cool completely.

Make the filling

In the bowl of a stand mixer beat cream cheese for about a minute until light.  Add marshmallow fluff and peanut butter and beat until smooth.  Transfer to another bowl and set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat heavy whipping cream until stiff peaks form.  Gently fold 1/3 of whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture, repeat two more times.  Fold in Nutter Butter cookies.  Pour and spread over cooled crust.

Make the topping

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the heavy whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff peaks form.   Gently spread over cream cheese filling.

Make the drizzle

In a small bowl or piping bag, heat peanut butter for about 30 seconds in a microwave or until it is thin enough to drizzle.  If heated in a bowl, use a spoon to drizzle over pie; if using a piping bag, snip off the very tip of the bag and drizzle over pie.

Cover and chill pie in fridge for at least two hours before serving, ideally.  But we don't live in an ideal world, and if you can't wait that long, it will hold together if you cut into it immediately.  But I always follow the directions and chill for the recommended time, so how would I know that? heh. heh. heh.

Jenny's Notes:

Which is better, natural soupy peanut butter or the stiff peanut butter, like Jif?  Most recipes will tell you to use the stiff kind, because it emulsifies better (in other words, doesn't separate as easily.)  I like to use natural because it doesn't have the added sugar or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats.  I find that subbing the natural almost always turns out fine, just be careful not to beat more than necessary, as that can sometimes cause the separation.  I'll let you know the recipes that need to use the stiff kind, and then you can use organic.

I adjusted this recipe so that it uses exactly one container of Nutter Butters.  If you're feeling generous, you could buy 2 packages and use more Nutter Butters crushed in the filling, and some crushed on top.  And have some left over for snacking...or fondue...

Adapted from Cookies & Cups

 

No-Bake Oreo Cheesecake

The American Section.  I guess we like our pancakes, Betty Crocker cake mixes, strawberry frosting, and Quaker oats??

The American Section.  I guess we like our pancakes, Betty Crocker cake mixes, strawberry frosting, and Quaker oats??

What do you do when you have 55 days until you move to another country?  Start thinking about all the food items and ingredients you won't be able to eat or buy while you're there.  Naturally.  I started to make a list of such things, and some of the items on there are rather tragic.  No real vanilla extract?  No Oreos, Butterfingers, or other terribly wonderful processed American goodies?  Pretzels only to be found of sketchy tough texture? Weird behaving marshmallows and graham crackers? (No S'mores for this girl.)  Italians also don't understand our fetish for peanut butter.  In all the grocery stores I've been in in Florence, (pobably all of them because they're kinda my happy place) I have only seen Skippy, maybe Peter Pan once, and usually priced about 4-5 euros, roughly $6.  There is a specialty Asian market, Vivi Market, that has an "American" section, and they sell the closest thing to real peanut butter I found.  It's called Calve, made in the Netherlands, but it still has the hydrogenated oil and sugar added to it.  Pumpkin is also a rarity over there.  They make such wonderful pumpkin filled ravioli and pumpkins for carving come out for a couple weeks around Halloween, but to buy a 15 oz can of Libby's pumpkin costs over 4 euro, compared to $1 in the States.  Pumpkin pie, bread, muffins, cake, pudding, only for special occasions, I guess...

Now don't get me wrong, I'm really not that worried about missing American food.  I did just fine for three months last fall, it's just a matter of understanding how different ingredients and substitutions behave in my favorite recipes.  I mean, this is Italy we're talking about.  Home to some of the best food in the world.  But I'm not partial or anything.  I keep a pretty good cover, though; you can't tell how much I love the food by the way I skip home from the super market with my arms full of pasta and heart bursting, waltz past the shelves of Nutella, guzzle acqua frizzante (sparkling water), double fist the cones of gelati, or giggle as I sweep the tubs of mascarpone that are cheaper than milk off the shelves.  Nope.  Not even around Christmas time when all the different kinds of panettoni started filling the shelves and Jenny's shopping cart.  I'm happy just thinking about all this wonderful food and its potential, but right now I am in the States, and I'm going to bake something I won't be able to for awhile.  Something with Oreos.  Lots of Oreos.  Or not bake, because this is a super easy no-bake cheesecake.

Unfortunately I forgot to take a picture of this cheesecake before my family started devouring it.  And continued eating it as I was trying to take photos.  But at least it was well received, right? 

No-Bake Oreo Cheesecake

Serves about 12

Ingredients:

For the Crust:

  • 16-18 Oreos
  • 4 Tbsp butter, melted

For the Filling:

  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 24 oz (3 8 oz packages) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 24 Oreos, coarsely chopped (or more)
  • 6-8 Oreos, coarsely chopped, for the top (or more!)

Directions:

Make the Crust:

In a food processor, pulse Oreos until crumbs.  Add butter and pulse until combined.  Press into a 9 in. tart pan, pie tin, or springform pan.  Freeze while you make the filling.

Make the Filling:

In the bowl of stand mixer or with an electric mixer, whip cream until stiff peaks appear.  Set aside.

Beat cream cheese in the bowl of a stand mixer or with an electric mixer until lighter and fluffier.  Beat in sugar.  Fold in 24 chopped Oreos, then gently fold in whipped cream. 

Remove crust from the freezer.  Pour in filling and smooth the top.  Sprinkle with remaining chopped Oreos and place in fridge until completely chilled, about 2 hours. 

Jenny's Notes:

Two packages of Oreos are needed for this recipe.  But you could squeeze by on one if you used half Oreos and half graham crackers for the crust.  You'll need about 1 1/4 cups of crumbs for the crust, then add an extra 2 Tbsp of cocoa powder to make it just as a chocolatey as if you used all Oreos, if you wish. 

Snickers Salad

Don't be deceived, this is not a real salad.  If visions of spinach salad with Snickers on top were dancing across your brain, I am so so sorry.  I love my greens and Snickers, but they do not belong together.  No no no.  Instead, think crisp Granny Smith apples and bits of Snickers lovingly folded into fluffy whipped cream and vanilla pudding.  So simple, and so delicious.  

No spinach, kale, or arugula were harmed in the making of this recipe. 

No spinach, kale, or arugula were harmed in the making of this recipe. 

If it makes you feel better, you could call this Green Apple Salad, like my mom does.  But it has the word "salad" in it, so I feel fully justified in keeping Snickers in the title.  As you wish.  OR if someone were to pin this on Pinterest it should probably be called Green Apple Snickers Salad That's Not a Salad with Whipped Cream and Home-Made Vanilla Pudding and Served in a Bowl and Should Be Eaten with a Spoon.  Because titles on Pinterest are really long and descriptive like that.  Actually that's what they are, descriptions, not titles.  I get it, people want people to know what's in it.  I want to know what's in it too, but a title WITH a description is in my opinion the best way to go.  "Oooh whatcha making?"  "Oh just a batch of kale-potato-onion-carrot-chicken-noodle-soup with fresh thyme and salt and pepper in organic free-range low-sodium chicken broth."  "Sounds good! What's in it?"  "Kale, potatoes, onions, carrots, chicken, noodles, fresh thyme, salt, pepper...oh, and chicken broth."  Next person walks in the room, "Oh, watcha eating?"  "..."   It can get tiring giving the spiel over and over again.  By no means are my titles perfect or always concise, mock them as you wish. Heheh.

Snickers Salad

Serves 8ish

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 1/3 cup milk of choice
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 8 oz heavy whipping cream (1 cup)
  • about 11 oz Snickers, chopped, plus extra for serving
  • 4 Granny Smith apples, chopped

Directions:

At least a few hours before assembling recipe, or up to 2 days before, make the vanilla pudding:

Whisk together sugar, cornstarch, and salt in a medium saucepan.  Slowly whisk in 1 cup of the milk.  Measure out the remaining 1/3 cup milk and whisk in the yolk, then whisk this slowly into the mixture in the saucepan. 

Place over medium heat and stir constantly until mixture thickens and the whisk leaves a trail.  Remove from heat and add vanilla.  Place in refrigerator until completely chilled.

Next, whip the heavy whipping cream in bowl of a stand mixer with whisk attachment or with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. 

Gently fold whipped cream into pudding, start with just a portion, about a third, then continue folding in whipped cream by thirds.  Gently fold in apples and Snickers.  Transfer to serving bowl and top with remaining Snickers.  Store in fridge until ready to serve.   

Best if assembled day of serving. 

Jenny's Notes:

  1. This can be made with any candy you like, Rolo, Milky Way, Payday, Twix, etc.  I personally do half and half of Snickers and Reese's.  And play with the ratio of apples to candy! 
  2. If using a candy with caramel, freeze to make chopping easier. 
  3. You can also add chopped peanuts if you want an extra crunch!
  4. I usually make this for large family gatherings and double the recipe for 12 or more people.

Adapted from Taste of Home

 

 

Treat Yo'self with Coffee Pancakes and Mocha Syrup

And whipped cream.

I got a little chocolate drizzle happy.  Not to mention this was a time sensitive photo, the first whipped cream mound melted and slipped off the back due to the hot and delicious nature of the pancakes.  Pictured here, whipped cream mound take 2. 

I got a little chocolate drizzle happy.  Not to mention this was a time sensitive photo, the first whipped cream mound melted and slipped off the back due to the hot and delicious nature of the pancakes.  Pictured here, whipped cream mound take 2. 

Some mornings I wake up and oatmeal, fruit, or eggs just aren't going to cut it.  Some mornings call for pancakes.  And some mornings call for pancakes that involve coffee, chocolate, and whipped cream.  The fact that the sun is shining again after a little snowstorm, family is around, it's Spring Break, and Good Friday, might also have had something to do with it.  So I decided to "Treat Yo'self."  Donna Meagle would be proud. 

Last night I watched the final episode of Parks & Recreation.  It was the perfect ending in every sense except that it was just that, the end. Wahhhhhhhh.  Guess I'll just have to start it all over again.  If you've never watched Parks & Rec then stop right where you are and go watch it.  Or better yet, make these delicious pancakes (more like dessert trying to disguise itself as breakfast food, which also happens to be two of my favorite categories of food) and eat them while watching Parks and Rec.  Actually, regardless of if you've ever seen the show or not, that's probably what you should do.  Treat Yo'self.  Even if it's midnight, because breakfast food is appropriate anytime of the day. 

If I had it my way, I would have breakfast for all 3 meals of the day.  Eggs and toast for breakfast, french toast and fruit for lunch, pancakes or waffles for dinner.  But that's not entirely socially acceptable (but we could start a movement!) nor a well-balanced diet, so I save that for Treat Yo'self days

   Alright, enough of the funny talk and let's get down to serious business.

Coffee Pancakes with Mocha Syrup

Makes 2-3 servings, or 6-8 pancakes.

Ingredients:

Mocha Syrup

Make this first so it has time to cool and your pancakes don't get cold!

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 Tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp corn starch
  • 2 Tbsp strong brewed coffee
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Combine all ingredients except vanilla in small saucepan.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until boiling.  Reduce heat to low and boil for 5 minutes.

Remove from heat and add vanilla.  Allow to cool while you make the pancakes.  Store leftovers in the fridge for up to 1 month.  Sugar is a wonderful preservative.  I'm going to live so long. 

Whipped Cream

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a hand held mixer, beat cream until soft peaks form.  Add sugar and vanilla, beat until stiff peaks appear.

Coffee Pancakes

Make these last so they will be nice and hot when you serve them!

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground espresso, or freshly ground coffee (sometimes I use the contents of a Nespresso capsule)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk of choice, or water
  • 2 Tbsp oil of choice, or melted butter or coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat lightly greased griddle or pan to 350 Fahrenheit.

In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, and ground espresso. 

Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the egg, milk, oil, and vanilla.  Stir until just moistened, some lumps will remain.  If you prefer thinner pancakes, you may add more milk.  Allow to sit for a few minutes.

Pour about 1/4 cup of batter onto hot griddle, allow to cook 1-2 minutes on each side, either until light golden-brown or when the air bubbles pop, but don't fill in immediately.  If the first pancakes seem too thick or too thin, add more milk or flour, respectively, until desired consistency is reached.  Repeat with remaining batter. 

Any leftover batter or pancakes can be stored in the refrigerator for about 1-2 days.  They can be reheated on the griddle or pan, microwave (boo), or my favorite way, the toaster. 

Assembly:

Place pancakes on a plate.  If desired, butter each pancake.  Drizzle generously with mocha syrup and top with copious amounts of whipped cream. And maybe drizzle with more syrup.  Don't forgot a complementary cup of coffee.  Complementary as in it goes with it nicely, not I'm giving you a complimentary cup of coffee.  I would totally give you a free cup of coffee, but, you're reading a blog right now, and this is only 2016.  Maybe by 2038 when Leslie Knope is President, I can send you coffee over the interwebs. 

Adapted from Pastry Affair

And Happy Good Friday.  This morning I kept thinking to myself "Black Friday" but that is quite the opposite of what today is.  No consumerism today.  A day to reflect on Jesus as He took our place on the cross.  The least deserving and only perfect man to walk the earth, bearing the wrath and punishment of separation from God the Father so that we might never have to.  Instead, He cloaks us in His righteousness so that we might receive the love of the Father freely.  Hallelujah, what a Savior.