Jeannie's Healthy Breakfast Cookies

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What could be better than a cookie? How about a cookie that’s packed with nutrients and can be eaten anytime, especially for breakfast, guilt free?

I love cookies. They are my go-to when I want to whip up something with limited time, or don’t have much energy for other more entailed desserts. I’m sure this has NOTHING to do with the fact that cookies are also one of my favorite things to eat. It ends up turning into a win-win-win situation because I’m having fun, being productive, get to eat some of the ingredients while baking, get to eat some dough while baking, and BONUS if there is enough dough to actually be baked into cookies! So many wins.

I have to bring up the negative, however, to classic cookie baking. They’re kinda calorific and not very good for you. I’m all for eating cookies for breakfast, but that usually goes along with a sugar crash later on. What to do?

Bake healthy cookies! They have to be delicious of course, and not gross. I have just the recipe for you, made up by my mom many years ago when we needed a portable nutritious breakfast for a trip. This recipe has been in my recipe box ever since as “Jean’s breakfast cookies”, made with many adjustments because the add ins are very versatile depending on your tastes. My mom likes to be called Jeannie (not by her kids of course) so I adapted the title accordingly.

One thing this recipe is not is a taste-alike recipe to say, chocolate chip cookies with a surprise twist that it’s healthy. Nope, these cookies have a satisfyingly healthy look and taste and are upfront about it from the get go. They get positive feedback and recipe requests wherever they go!

The recipe that follows is just one version of many, many possibilities. Just keep in mind that major adjustments may need other adjustments. For example, if you don’t have any honey or maple syrup on hand for the sweetener, you could use raw or regular cane sugar. Substituting a liquid for a dry ingredient, however, will mean you may need more liquid from elsewhere. Maybe add another egg, a bit more oil, or even water until you get a cookie dough consistency once again. Other ideas to make the recipe your own:

  • Use any kind of flour you wish instead of wheat flour. Oat flour, almond flour, coconut flour…I often use wheat germ in place of part of the flour or flaxmeal, usually 1/4 cup.

  • If you want these cookies to be gluten-free, ensure that your oats are gluten-free, and use a gluten-free flour.

  • Change up the spices. Sometimes towards fall I also add a bit of ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Cardamom is also nice.

  • Beyond dried fruit and walnuts, get creative with your add-ins! Just try not to go too far beyond 1 cup, otherwise there might not be enough dough to hold everything together. In the photos on this post I used dried apples, dried cranberries, and walnuts. I’ve also added various combinations of dried cherries, prunes, dried apricots, raisins, dates, dried figs, dried pears, fresh apples, grated coconut, pecans, hazelnuts, dark chocolate, crystallized ginger, and anything else I had on hand!

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from my mama


Jeannie’s Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Makes about 18-22 cookies

Ingredients:

2019-02-17 14.45.17.jpg
  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive or coconut oil

  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour

  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats

  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped

  • 1/2 apple, diced

  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.

  1. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.

  2. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.

  3. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.

  4. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder.

  • olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil.

  • 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

healthy, nutritious, cookies, gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, dried fruit, apple, fall spices, oats, nuts, coconut, portable
breakfast, dessert, snack
American
Yield: 12-16 cookies
Author:

Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

Healthy cookies packed with nutritious ingredients that make for a great breakfast or anytime snack. Dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and can easily be made gluten-free.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: 10 Mtotal time: 30 M

ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive oil or coconut oil
  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 apple, diced
  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

instructions:

How to cook Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.
  3. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
  4. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.
  5. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

NOTES:

you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder. olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil. 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

Calories

265.40

Fat (grams)

15.87

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.49

Carbs (grams)

27.23

Fiber (grams)

3.34

Net carbs

23.89

Sugar (grams)

9.53

Protein (grams)

5.72

Sodium (milligrams)

188.36

Cholesterol (grams)

31.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2019-02-17+15.36.02.jpg

Food in Florence: Where to Eat the Most Scrumptious Breakfasts

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Starting off a new Italy series all about Food in Florence that I’m calling…wait for it…Food in Florence! Yay, you guessed it!

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I’ve been getting enough requests this past year from friends and friends for friends visiting Florence that I think it’s time to start compiling some helpful and easily accessible lists and tips of what to do/where to eat in this adopted city of mine, Florence. Creating custom “to do” and “to eat” lists is not very time efficient I find…or maybe I just give an overwhelming amount of information…nah, that couldn’t possibly be it. :)

It’s great fun to create lists that help people get the most out of their time in Florence. My favorite way to see a new city is exploring and wandering without any tour guides (with certain exceptions), while having read up a ton beforehand and bookmarked things to see, places to shop, and foods to try and where to try them. The biggest problem I always run into while preparing for a trip is knowing which lists are authentic and whose opinion I should trust. The lists in this new “Food in Florence” series would have saved me quite a bit of time before I came to Florence for the first time. I hope they will be useful to you and help you decide where you want to dine around Florence without falling for the tourist traps, specifically in this list where you can find the most scrumptious breakfasts.

As a disclaimer, these lists will probably be ever evolving because 1. Florence has a million and one places to try, 2. New places are always opening, 3. I’ve only lived here just over 2 consecutive years and 4. I probably don’t eat out nearly as much as you would expect for someone who lives in Italy. (Whaaat I don’t eat pasta for lunch and pizza for dinner everyday?! Lame.) Just remember, I’m a real person with a real budget. :)

What is a typical Italian breakfast?

You’re going out to breakfast, but what can you expect to find on the menu? What do Italians typically eat for breakfast?

Italians don’t go to a sit-down type restaurant for breakfast, which is usually what entails if you go out to breakfast in America. Instead, most Italians have their favorite local bar that they go to several, if not every, morning of the week. A cappuccino is usually eaten with a pastry, and just as often eaten standing and chatting as it is sitting down and reading the morning newspaper. At just over 2euro for a cappuccino and pastry, it makes for a very affordable breakfast out. If there is a menu, it’s probably a coffee menu on the wall. The pastries are chosen through the display case. It’s common to ask what they’re filled with, if one is unsure. You can expect varying croissants and sugary puff pastries filled with the classics: cream, chocolate, Nutella, jam (usually apricot or blackberry) and apple, along with more specialty fillings that will vary by place, such as cream and orange, whole wheat with honey, pistachio, etc.

What is the best time to go out for breakfast?

The famed hot chocolate at Caffè Gilli

The famed hot chocolate at Caffè Gilli

Whatever time you want. Really. Most pasticcerie and bars open between 5:30-7:00am, but pastries will be served until they’re gone, which is often into the afternoon. Of course, some busy places will run out by noon, so my only word of advice would be to go before then. You can manage that, right?

Or, if you’re like me and like to eat right away, have some fruit and snacks to eat first thing in the morning, and then eat a leisurely second breakfast or elevensies at a caffè once you’re out and about.

You’ll find people eating breakfast anywhere from the early morning hours to late morning, and it is socially acceptable to eat a pastry and a cappuccino in the afternoon as a snack, or a cappuccino by itself, contrary to popular American belief. See #12 on this blog post if you want to know why. So have at it! Just don’t drink a cappuccino with any food item other than pastries/cookies, k? Cappuccino and pizza taste gross together anyway.

Breakfast Etiquette

Bottega di Pasticceria

Bottega di Pasticceria

As a general rule, it’s best to pay at the cash register before ordering your pastry and drink at the bar. Many places don’t care if you eat or pay first, even if they have signs up asking you to pay first, however…some places DO care and if you’re not familiar with that particular locale, pay first to be safe.

It’s also advisable to ask before you sit down as some places up-charge for the “sit-down service.” Ya know, paying up to twice the price for your drink for the luxury of sitting down and usually them bringing you your order. Don’t think that carrying your own drink to your table is going to get you any discounts. You’re really paying for occupying the table, the service I like to think of as bonus so you might as well enjoy it!

The only place on the list below that should have an up-charge is Gilli and possibly Bottega di Pasticceria. Since they are classy and all about the experience anyway, I think we can forgive them.


Where to Eat the Most Scrumptious Breakfasts

  1. La Ménagère

    Via de’ Neri, 8, right in the center by San Lorenzo and the Mercato Centrale

    Open 8:00am - 2:30am every day

    Large and uniquely beautiful space, each room is a little different. Very cool atmosphere. There is even an area where you can buy some merchandise and flowers. Lots of pretty plants! Indoor and outdoor seating. Great coffee. A bit on the pricier side.

  2. Santarosa Bistrot

    Lungarno di Santa Rosa, on the south side of the river.

    Open 8:00am - Midnight weekdays, 10:00am - Midnight Saturday and Sunday

    Beautiful outdoor caffe where you can choose to sit outside among the greenery or in the main area with the roof if it rains. So cozy. I love this place when I want to get away from the hectic city life for a moment.

  3. Caffetteria delle Oblate

    Via dell’Oriuolo, 26, in the center not far from the Duomo.

    Open 2:00pm - 7:00pm Monday, 9:00am - Midnight Tuesday through Friday, 10:00am - Midnight Saturday, closed on Sunday.

    An old convent turned library with a third story caffè, this place is super cool and has spectacular views of the Duomo to boot. You can sit in the caffetteria or take your food to any of the 4 sided terrace overlooking in the inner open courtyard. There are seats and tables on most sides, but they are often occupied with studying students. When this happens I usually just sit on the floor, no one will mind. Note, the caffetteria will charge you 10 cents per person who eats outside of the caffetteria area. I find this ironically humorous as most bars will charge you if you sit down IN their area, not if you take away. Italy, the land of inconsistency.

  4. Bottega di Pasticceria

    Lungarno Francesco Ferrucci, 9c, south of the river on the edge of the city center

    Open 7:00am - 10:00pm Tuesday through Sunday, closed Monday

    This is a lovely open two story caffe that has an elegant feel to it, although don’t feel as though you need to dress up! Certain parts of the second story floor are made of glass, a warning to those who are wearing dresses and skirts! ;)

  5. Caffetteria La Loggia

    Via Pietrapiana, 12, not far from the church of Santa Croce

    Open 7:00am - 8:30pm every day

    A small little place but popular with the locals and me! A good variety of pastries and coffee, they even have some specialty drinks such as Hazelnut or Pistachio Coffee, very sweet but interesting to try! If there are no available places to sit, you can always drink your coffee and eat your pastry standing up at the bar, like the Italians do, or go and sit in the nearby Piazza della Loggia which the city of Florence recently redid.

  6. Caffè Libertà

    Piazza della Libertà, 27r, at the top tip of the city center in Piazza della Libertà

    Open 5:00am - 9:30pm every day

    This caffe is home to probably some of my favorite pastries in all of Florence, and that’s just talking about the pastries. The desserts are mouth-watering as well. I personally recommend the apple filled pastry, but I know others who rave about the pistachio filled pastry. Indoor or outdoor seating.

  7. Caffè Pasticceria Serafini

    Via Gioberti, 168r, just outside the city center on the east side

    Open 7:00am - 9:00am Monday through Saturday, closed Sunday

    Serafini is located in a very local area and has wonderful pastries and desserts. It can get busy, but there is indoor and outdoor seating and always the option to eat at the bar or take away. They have a great chocolate and pear pastry.

  8. Caffè Michelangelo

    Via Ghibellina, 116r, in the center near to Santa Croce

    Open 6:00am - 8:00pm Monday through Saturday, closed Sunday

    Another great local caffè with yummy pastries and coffee. There are a couple of baristas here who can make a mean cappuccino.

  9. Caffè Gilli

    Via Roma, 1r, on Piazza della Repubblica

    Open 7:30am - Midnight every day

    Gilli is the oldest caffè in Florence, established more than 270 years ago by a Swiss family. Their hot chocolate is renowned and their sweets and chocolate beloved by many. Situated in a beautiful building with a large covered outdoor sitting area right on Piazza della Repubblica, this is the place to go if you’re looking for a high class and historic experience. Just remember you’ll be paying higher prices, i.e., a normal hot chocolate costs 3-3.50euro, Gilli will charge you somewhere around 7euro.


Caffetteria delle Oblate

Caffetteria delle Oblate

Buon Appetito!

Want to see some of your favorite spots added to the list? Let me know in the comments below!

Mocha Punch

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This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

On entering any coffee shop in America, you’ll easily find mocha on the menu. I usually think of black coffee and cappuccino as being among the most commonly ordered, vanilla latte and mocha closely following. Because after enjoying coffee in its purer forms it is logical to then pair it with two of the greatest flavors: vanilla and chocolate. No? But I’m not a barista, so if you are, you tell me. :)

This is not the case in Italy. Italy may be the birthplace of coffee as we know it today, but that doesn’t mean that they own ALL the copyrights to the best coffee drinks. Cappuccino, espresso, macchiato….but Vanilla Latte and Mocha are not on the menu here, unless you go to one of the few “American” coffee shops, such as Arnold. First of all, if you order a latte you will get….milk. And if you order a mocha you will get…a withering stare. Not the end of the world, especially with all of the other types of coffee you can order, but sometimes I just want a mocha, ya know? I usually order my cappuccino with cocoa powder on top, but that’s not quite the same.

What’s a person to do when they don’t have mocha readily available to them? Make it at home, of course! It’s so easy, and can be even easier in a pinch, see my notes below!

But doesn’t the title say punch, you ask? Yes, yes it does. The recipe that follows can be drunk as a classic mocha, hot or iced, by simply not adding the ice cream. Or, as per the recipe, pour the whole thing in a punch bowl, add scoops of ice cream, and voila! Mocha punch fit for any party.

Recipe adapted from a friend’s mama. :)


Mocha Punch

Serves about 20

Ingredients:

  • 3 quarts / 3 L freshly brewed strong coffee

  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g sugar

  • 2 quarts / 2 L milk

  • 3/4 cup / 240g chocolate syrup, try this homemade recipe!

  • 3 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1/2 gallon (8 cups) / 1 kg vanilla ice cream

Directions:

  1. Pour brewed coffee into a large pot, bowl, or other large container. Stir sugar into hot coffee until dissolved. Cool in fridge.

  2. Remove coffee from fridge and add milk, chocolate syrup, and vanilla and stir until well combined.

  3. Chill until cold or overnight.

  4. Just before serving, pour into serving container, mix briefly, and scoop ice cream into the punch, allowing the ice cream to melt for a few minutes before serving. (Skip this step if not serving as a punch.)

  5. Store in fridge.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • For an everyday mocha I reduce the sugar and milk, sometimes by up to half, as I usually drink my coffee black, and it makes it less indulgent.

  • You can substitute store-bought chocolate syrup for the homemade and use instant coffee instead of brewing, if you wish! I think the flavor will always be superior when you make things from scratch, or in this instance, use good and fresh coffee instead of instant!

  • If you choose to make the homemade chocolate syrup recipe, make a half recipe for exactly the quantity needed for this Mocha Punch. Or make a full recipe and enjoy the extra!

  • Of course, you don’t have to use vanilla ice cream, you could use chocolate or moose tracks or heck, coffee ice cream! Whatever you like.

  • When serving, you can choose to pour the whole recipe’s worth of punch into a punch bowl with ice cream, or, for smaller or longer parties, start with just a portion of the punch and ice cream, keeping the remainder in the fridge and freezer, respectively, so by the end the punch isn’t warm and the ice cream long melted.

  • This punch is easily stored in pitchers or empty milk jugs!

American
Yield: 20
Author:

Mocha Punch

Sweet and creamy coffee meets chocolate in this adaptable mocha. Add ice cream for a delectable party punch or drink hot or cold for an anytime mocha!
prep time: 25 Mcook time: total time: 25 M

ingredients:

  • 3 quarts / 3 L freshly brewed strong coffee
  • 1 1/2 cups / 300g sugar
  • 2 quarts / 2 L milk
  • 3/4 cup / 240g chocolate syrup, try this homemade recipe!
  • 3 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 gallon (8 cups) / 1 kg vanilla ice cream

instructions:

How to cook Mocha Punch

  1. Pour brewed coffee into a large pot, bowl, or other large container. Stir sugar into hot coffee until dissolved. Cool in fridge.
  2. Remove coffee from fridge and add milk, chocolate syrup, and vanilla and stir until well combined.
  3. Chill until cold or overnight.
  4. Just before serving, pour into serving container, mix briefly, and scoop ice cream into the punch, allowing the ice cream to melt for a few minutes before serving. (Skip this step if not serving as a punch.)
  5. Store in fridge.

NOTES:

For an everyday mocha I reduce the sugar and milk, sometimes by up to half, as I usually drink my coffee black, and it makes it less indulgent. You can substitute store-bought chocolate syrup for the homemade and use instant coffee instead of brewing, if you wish! I think the flavor will always be superior when you make things from scratch, or in this instance, use good and fresh coffee instead of instant! If you choose to make the homemade chocolate syrup recipe, make a half recipe for exactly the quantity needed for this Mocha Punch. Or make a full recipe and enjoy the extra! Of course, you don’t have to use vanilla ice cream, you could use chocolate or moose tracks or heck, coffee ice cream! Whatever you like. When serving, you can choose to pour the whole recipe’s worth of punch into a punch bowl with ice cream, or, for smaller or longer parties, start with just a portion of the punch and ice cream, keeping the remainder in the fridge and freezer, respectively, so by the end the punch isn’t warm and the ice cream long melted. This punch is easily stored in pitchers or empty milk jugs!

Calories

202.41

Fat (grams)

4.98

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.02

Carbs (grams)

33.94

Fiber (grams)

0.49

Net carbs

33.45

Sugar (grams)

26.31

Protein (grams)

5.27

Sodium (milligrams)

91.66

Cholesterol (grams)

19.30
Nutritional information is approximate. Calculated including vanilla ice cream
Created using The Recipes Generator
2018-12-29+15.44.21-2.jpg

Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

But why are they so golden? Many thanks to butter and egg wash.

But why are they so golden? Many thanks to butter and egg wash.

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

I've been thinking about you a lot recently.  How sweet you are, how tender you are, how you like to butter me up. Yeah, you're a little soft, but I love that about you.  I wake up in the morning hoping you'll want to meet me for coffee.  Will you, brioche?  Please say yes.  Before life hardens you and you become like a rock.  But if not, how about your friend?  He looks yummy, too - Oh hey. Welcome to my blog!  Yep, I'm writing a recipe about brioche, mmm hmmm.  No, I was not talking to the brioche. Just eating. Nom nom nom.  See?  Delicious.  Yep.  Believe me and make these, and you'll be talking to your brioche, too.  

Brioche is a yeasted, enriched bread or bun.  By enriched I mean, rich in butter, with help from sugar and eggs.  The amount of butter in the recipe for brioche must be equal to or more than 20% of the flour weight, but can go up to 100%.  I like to think of brioche in three categories, as called by Peter Reinhart: 

  1. Poor man's brioche - consisting of at least 20% butter

  2. Middle-class brioche - consisting of around 50% butter

  3. Rich man's brioche - consisting of 50-80% butter, or on rare occasion, more!

To find the butter percentage, divide the weight of the butter by the weight of the flour and multiply by 100.  

Butter weight / flour weight x 100 = Butter percentage

For example, let's take the recipe below, which calls for 6 Tbsp butter or 85g by weight, divided by 2 1/2 cups flour or 300g by weight, which equals 0.28.  Multiply 0.28 by 100 and you get 28.  Thus the butter percentage is 28 percent in this recipe.  Poor man's brioche!  

85 / 300 x 100 = 28

If the words ratio, weight, percentage make you glaze over, stay with me.  It can be confusing at first, but understanding these concepts can really enhance your baking experience.  Think of it as the key that unlocks all recipes and links them together.  Instead of blindly following a recipe, always secretly wondering what will happen if you omit an egg, use baking soda instead of baking powder, add less flour or sugar than called for, formulas such as this can help you compare recipes across the board. start to notice similarities, how textures are affected by the ratio of liquids to flour, fat to flour, etc.  Ok, so baking soda vs. baking powder is more in the realm of science, but also helpful!  Science and math, who knew?  I know, it's a lot of work, with a scrunched up nose, calculator, and pencil eraser shavings everywhere as you figure out formulas, but it's worth it!  Of course, I'm not here to force you to do anything, so feel free to skip on down to the recipe and ignore all this fancy talk.  No shame or guilt.  

Trust me, I'm still new to this too, and figuring it out myself.  I feel like I've just discovered the tip of the iceberg, and I know, it's slippery along the way as you're calculating numbers, but at the end, you'll have a giant...iceberg...of...information?  Yeah, that.  My boat hit the er, iceberg, when I was gifted Peter Reinhart's bread book.  I had recently started my own levain, really wanting to learn how to make artisan breads.  I didn't really know what I was getting into when I mixed some flour and water together to make a levain.  Now I see there is so much to learn, and I hope to share some of the adventure with you.  I don't plan to become a master bread baker before I start to blog some recipes, so you can share in the discoveries with me.    

Are we done yet? No, on to the poor man's brioche!

Recipe adapted from Soup Addict


Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

Makes 12 rolls

Ingredients:

IMG_4887.jpg
  • 2 1/2 cups / 300g all-purpose flour

  • 2 tsp / 6g instant yeast

  • 1/3 / 67g cup sugar

  • 1 1/2 tsp / 11g salt

  • 1/2 cup / 118g milk

  • 1/2 cup / 118g buttermilk or sour milk

  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter, room temperature

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 1/3 cup / 234g chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat.

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix together flour, yeast, sugar, and salt.  

  2. In a small saucepan heat milk and buttermilk until about 105°F / 40°C.  Add to flour mixture and mix until well combined.  

  3. With the mixer running, add butter and allow to mix until fully immersed.  Add 1 egg.  

  4. Switch to the dough hook and knead on medium speed for 6-8 minutes, until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl and starts to make a slapping sound against the bowl.  If the dough is still clinging to the sides, add a touch more flour until it no longer sticks.  

  5. Mix in chocolate chips just long enough to incorporate.  

  6. Transfer dough to a large oiled bowl.  Flip the dough so that both sides are now oiled.  Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to ferment in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours, or until doubled in size.   

  7. Place dough on a lightly floured surface and divide into 12 equal pieces.  Roll each piece into a ball and place evenly spaced on the prepared baking sheet.  

  8. Beat the second egg with 1 tablespoon of water.  Use a pastry brush or your fingers to brush each dough well with egg wash.  Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour, or until puffed.  

  9. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown and internal temperature reads about 180°F / 82°C.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you don’t have buttermilk or sour milk, you can make your own sour milk by adding 1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar per 1 cup milk.

  • After you've made the dough, you can place the dough in the fridge before the first or second ferment.  That way the ferment will happen slowly in the fridge, and you can shape or bake the rolls the next day.  Allow the dough to come to room temperature before rolling or baking, then continue as instructed.

  • Use any leftover egg wash for another baking venture or omelette!

brioche, brioche rolls, poor man's brioche, recipe, chocolate chip brioche, butter
Bread, Breakfast
French
Yield: 12
Author:

Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

Buttery, soft, sweet, enriched brioche rolls speckled with chocolate chips.
prep time: 55 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 85 M

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups / 300g all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp / 6g instant yeast
  • 1/3 / 67g cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp / 11g salt
  • 1/2 cup / 118g milk
  • 1/2 cup / 118g buttermilk or sour milk
  • 6 Tbsp / 85g butter, room temperature
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/3 cup / 234g chocolate chips or chunks

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Chip Brioche Rolls

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone mat.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix together flour, yeast, sugar, and salt.
  3. In a small saucepan heat milk and buttermilk until about 105°F / 40°C. Add to flour mixture and mix until well combined.
  4. With the mixer running, add butter and allow to mix until fully immersed. Add 1 egg.
  5. Switch to the dough hook and knead on medium speed for 6-8 minutes, until the dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl and starts to make a slapping sound against the bowl. If the dough is still clinging to the sides, add a touch more flour until it no longer sticks.
  6. Mix in chocolate chips just long enough to incorporate.
  7. Transfer dough to a large oiled bowl. Flip the dough so that both sides are now oiled. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to ferment in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours, or until doubled in size.
  8. Place dough on a lightly floured surface and divide into 12 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and place evenly spaced on the prepared baking sheet.
  9. Beat the second egg with 1 tablespoon of water. Use a pastry brush or your fingers to brush each dough well with egg wash. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour, or until puffed.
  10. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown and internal temperature reads about 180°F / 82°C.

NOTES:

If you don’t have buttermilk or sour milk, you can make your own sour milk by adding 1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar per 1 cup milk. After you've made the dough, you can place the dough in the fridge before the first or second ferment. That way the ferment will happen slowly in the fridge, and you can shape or bake the rolls the next day. Allow the dough to come to room temperature before rolling or baking, then continue as instructed. Use any leftover egg wash for another baking venture or omelette!

Calories

265.01

Fat (grams)

12.95

Sat. Fat (grams)

7.58

Carbs (grams)

34.61

Fiber (grams)

1.96

Net carbs

32.65

Sugar (grams)

13.04

Protein (grams)

5.38

Sodium (milligrams)

439.38

Cholesterol (grams)

47.41
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_4900.jpg

Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

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Shout out to all my Swedish friends, here's an ode to Semlor!  Do I even know any Swedish people? Do I even know any Swedish-Americans?  Hmmm.  Well, if you know one, or are one, let me know would ya?  I think the most I know about Sweden is what I learned from the American Girl doll Kirsten as a child, they have a pretty blue and yellow flag, and that these buns are delicious.  They take a bit of time to make, unless you have a bread machine, but honestly I love working food with my hands and would take the extra time to mix and knead over a bread machine any day.  However, sometimes practicality or time saving takes place over the therapeutic sensation of kneading bread.  Your call.  But if you choose the bread machine route, you're on your own because I've never operated one.  Sorry 'bout ya.  My roommate used to have one and she made it look so easy that I'm sure you could translate this recipe for a bread recipe easily without my help.  

These buns, as I've read, are traditionally associated with Lent and eaten on Shrove Tuesday, or Fat Tuesday.  You could think of them as the equivalent to Polish paczki.  If you're thinking, "Wow, thanks, that helps me so much - WHAT is a paczki??" It's similar to a jelly filled doughnut traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday and pronounced poonch-key.  Also delicious.  There is quite a large Polish population near where I grew up, including an annual Polka Fest!  Plenty of polka-ing and beer to go around.  Anyway, Semlor is also eaten in various forms and under other names in other Nordic countries such as Finland, Estonia, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania, Latvia, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands.  Let's stick to Swedish Semlor, shall we? 

Recipe adapted from LondonEats


Semlor

Makes 10 buns

Ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns

  • 1 cup / 237g milk

  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter

  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt

  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom

  • 2 eggs

  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour

  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream

For the Marzipan Filling

  • insides of the buns

  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk

  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream

  • powdered sugar, for dusting

Directions:

Make the Cardamom Buns

Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.

  1. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer.  Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt.  Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.  

  2. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle.  Beat until all ingredients are incorporated.  Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms.  Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed.  You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom.  If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.  

  3. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more.  Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls.  Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.   

  4. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.

  5. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.  

  6. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.  

Make the Marzipan Filling

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

Your filling may look like baby spit-up, too. And that's ok.

  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside.  Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl.  Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can.  Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.  

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.  

Assembly

  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.  

  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine.

  • If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was.

  • When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass.

  • I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

  • "Semlor" is plural, so if you would like to eat only one bun, ask for a "Semla."

semla,semlor,cardamom buns,marzipan filling,swedish buns
Nordic
Yield: 10
Author:

Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Sweet cardamom buns with a creamy marzipan filling and whipped cream topping.
prep time: 1 H & 20 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 1 H & 35 M

ingredients:

For the Cardamom Buns
  • 1 cup / 237g milk
  • 7 Tbsp / 100g butter
  • 2 tsp / 6.3g instant yeast
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g salt
  • 1/3 cup / 40g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp / 1g ground cardamom
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups / 450g all-purpose flour or bread flour
  • 1 tsp / 5g water, milk, or heavy cream
For the Marzipan Filling
  • insides of the buns
  • 7 oz / 200g marzipan (make your own marzipan here!)
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g milk
  • generous 3/4 cup / 195g heavy whipping cream
  • powdered sugar, for dusting

instructions:

How to cook Semlor (Swedish Cardamom Buns)

Make the Cardamom Buns
  1. Oven 390°F / 200°C. 2 baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silpat.
  2. Place milk in a small saucepan and heat until milk just begins to simmer. Remove from heat and add butter, stirring to melt. Once butter is completely melted and integrated, allow mixture to sit until lukewarm.
  3. Place milk mixture, yeast, salt, sugar, cardamom, and 1 egg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle. Beat until all ingredients are incorporated. Switch to the dough hook and add flour slowly on medium-low speed until a soft dough forms. Continue to beat for several minutes on medium speed. You should hear the dough slapping the sides of the bowl, sticking only to the bottom. If the dough is sticking to the sides, add flour gradually until dough no longer sticks.
  4. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 1-2 minutes more. Divide dough into 10 equal portions and roll into balls. Place evenly prepared baking sheets. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  5. Beat the second egg with the water and use a pastry brush or your hands to evenly brush the buns.
  6. Bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown or when internal temperature registers 185-190°F / 85-88°C.
  7. Transfer buns to a cooling rack, cover with a towel, and allow to cool.
Make the Marzipan Filling
  1. Once the buns are cool enough to handle, cut out a lid from the top using a small serrated knife. Set the lids aside. Using a fork, scoop out the inside of each bun and place in a medium bowl. Crumble/tear with your fingers as best you can. Add marzipan and milk and work into a smooth paste using your hands or a fork.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream until stiff peaks from.
Assembly
  1. Fill the buns evenly with the marzipan mixture. Pipe whipped cream over the filling using a large star tip (1M) or a spoon.
  2. Place the tops on the whipped cream, then dust tops with powdered sugar using a small sieve.

NOTES:

I always knead my dough by hand for a bit after kneading it in a machine. The machine doesn't always do a perfect job and I've had instances before where I kneaded solely in the machine and had a strange dough rise as a result. A few rounds of kneading by hand fixed the problem; the yeast hadn't been distributed evenly when kneaded only by machine. If you have a scale you can ensure your buns will be all the same size. Weigh the dough mass, then divide this number by 10. This will give you an idea how much each of the 10 buns should weigh. You don't have to be exact down to the gram, of course, but I would stay within 5 or so grams of this number. Divide the dough mass in 2, then divide each half into 5 equal parts. Then weigh each piece to see how accurate your eye was. When you "crumble" the filling into pieces you may notice the dough is moist and hard to crumble, but tear it as best you can into small chunks. When you add the milk and marzipan the pieces will absorb the liquid and eventually come together into a smoothish mass. I made my own marzipan for this recipe and used rose water. Rose is a very strong flavor, so go light, but I thought it made for a very unique pairing with almond and cardamom and very "European" tasting. Or, leave out the rose if you're skeptical and you'll still have a lovely cardamom/almond combination.

Calories

436.24

Fat (grams)

19.78

Sat. Fat (grams)

10.76

Carbs (grams)

56.25

Fiber (grams)

1.82

Net carbs

54.43

Sugar (grams)

18.41

Protein (grams)

9.08

Sodium (milligrams)

149.19

Cholesterol (grams)

84.19
Nutritional information is approximate.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Coconut Scones

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Scones come in all different shapes and sizes.  Whether they're flat or fluffy, dry or moist, sweet or savory, round, square, or triangular.  I've never had the honor to eat a real British or Scottish scone, but I have a few favorite recipes that I only hope the real thing could live up to.  Not too sweet and lovely with a cup of tea or coffee, although drinking liquids with them isn’t necessary because they are moist enough by themselves.  I always think bright citrus flavors are marvelous in scones, but you can never go wrong with coconut.  

Recipe adapted from Food Network.


Coconut Scones

Makes about 20

Ingredients:

For the Scones

  • 4 1/4 cups / 531g all-purpose flour

  • 2 Tbsp / 30g baking powder

  • 1 tsp / 5g salt

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar, plus more for sprinkling

  • 2 cups / 160g shredded unsweetened coconut

  • 1 1/2 cups / 339g butter, cubed, or 1 1/4 cups / 277g oil

  • 1 cup / 237g unsweetened coconut milk

  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten

  • 1 tsp / 5g coconut extract

  • 2 cups / 250g pecans, finely chopped, plus more for sprinkling, optional

For the Glaze

  • 1 cup / 125g powdered sugar

  • 2-3 Tbsp / 30-45g unsweetened coconut milk

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g coconut extract

  • 1/4 tsp / 1g vanilla extract

Directions:

Oven 400°F / 205°C.  Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

Make the Scones

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and coconut.  Add the butter or oil, and beat until mixture is coarse and crumbly.  

  2. In another bowl, whisk together milk, eggs, and coconut extract.  Stir into dry ingredients just until moistened.  Do not over mix.  Gently stir in pecans.  

  3. Scoop dough onto prepared baking pans into approximately 3 in / 7cm mounds, leaving enough space between scones so that they can brown evenly, about 2 in / 5cm.  Sprinkle with extra sugar and pecans, if desired.   

  4. Bake for 13-16 minutes, until starting to turn golden and the center no longer feels doughy to the touch.  

Make the Glaze

  1. In a small bowl whisk together powdered sugar, extracts, and 2 tablespoons of milk.  Add more milk to get a drizzling consistency, if needed.  

  2. Drizzle over scones while they are still warm.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • You might notice I don't always give the weight for measurements less than 1 tsp and never for eggs.  Unless a recipe needs to be very exact (such as plenty of French classics), I find eggs don't need to be weighed.  A little less or extra egg in a recipe like this one is not going to make a world of difference, and the 1/4 of an egg you had to remove to get an exact weight would probably go to waste.  That’s a shame, so I always round the egg measurements or weight to the nearest whole egg.  As far as the teaspoon measurements, I find scales tend to be less precise than an actual teaspoon, unless you have one of those smaller and more precise (to the nearest .001g) scales.

  • Some family members of mine don't appreciate nuts in their baked goods, so I omit the nuts in the batter and sprinkle some on half of the scones.  

  • An ice cream scoop works great to transfer the dough onto the baking sheets.  

  • Don't have coconut milk?  Use any kind of milk you have on hand! 

coconut scones, moist scones, pecan, coconut, coconut glaze, scones,
Yield: about 20 scones
Author:

Coconut Scones

Moist coconut scones with a coconut glaze and pecans.
prep time: 25 Mcook time: 16 Mtotal time: 41 M

ingredients:

For the Scones
  • 4 1/4 cups / 531g all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp / 30g baking powder
  • 1 tsp / 5g salt
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 2 cups / 160g shredded unsweetened coconut
  • 1 1/2 cups / 339g butter, cubed, or 1 1/4 cups / 277g oil
  • 1 cup / 237g unsweetened coconut milk
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp / 5g coconut extract
  • 2 cups / 250g pecans, finely chopped, plus more for sprinkling, optional
For the Glaze
  • 1 cup / 125g powdered sugar
  • 2-3 Tbsp / 30-45g unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g coconut extract
  • 1/4 tsp / 1g vanilla extract

instructions:

How to cook Coconut Scones

Make the Scones
  1. Oven 400°F / 205°C. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and coconut. Add the butter or oil, and beat until mixture is coarse and crumbly.
  3. In another bowl, whisk together milk, eggs, and coconut extract. Stir into dry ingredients just until moistened. Do not over mix. Gently stir in pecans.
  4. Scoop dough onto prepared baking pans into approximately 3 in / 7cm mounds, leaving enough space between scones so that they can brown evenly, about 2 in / 5cm. Sprinkle with extra sugar and pecans, if desired.
  5. Bake for 13-16 minutes, until starting to turn golden and the center no longer feels doughy to the touch.
Make the Glaze
  1. In a small bowl whisk together powdered sugar, extracts, and 2 tablespoons of milk. Add more milk to get a drizzling consistency, if needed.
  2. Drizzle over scones while they are still warm.

NOTES:

Some family members of mine don't appreciate nuts in their baked goods, so I omit the nuts in the batter and sprinkle some on half of the scones. An ice cream scoop works great to transfer the dough onto the baking sheets. Don't have coconut milk? Use any kind of milk you have on hand!

Calories

410.68

Fat (grams)

29.69

Sat. Fat (grams)

14.90

Carbs (grams)

33.36

Fiber (grams)

3.25

Net carbs

30.11

Sugar (grams)

9.93

Protein (grams)

5.89

Sodium (milligrams)

384.66

Cholesterol (grams)

73.64
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 20 servings and includes pecans.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Tourte Milanese

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Tourte Milanese, also known as Tourte Milanaise.  No, the second version does not include mayonnaise.  Part of the family en croute, or encased in dough.  Who doesn't want to eat food, soup, and anything edible wrapped in flaky, buttery dough?  In this case, roasted peppers, herbed scrambled eggs, cheese, spinach, and meat.  

You will feel quite accomplished pulling this out of the oven, and taking your first bite into the explosion of hot, flaky layers, melty cheese, herbs, sweet peppers, smoky meat, and garlicky spinach.  It may look intimidating, but you can adjust this recipe to how much time and effort you want to put into it.  For example, you can make your own puff pastry, or you can pick it up at the store.  You could roast your own peppers, or buy a jar of already roasted peppers.  Of course, I enjoy making everything as home-made and from scratch as possible...clearly don't have kids yet.  I recommend reading through the recipe once or twice and taking a peek at my notes at the bottom to make your game plan.  For example, puff pastry can easily be a two day recipe, so you'll want to make that a day ahead, or way ahead, and freeze it until you have the urge to make a recipe like this.  

Want some inspiration?  Watch this fun video of Julia Child and Michel Richard making Puff Pastry and Tourte Milanese!


Tourte Milanese

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Crust

  • 1 lb. / 450g puff pastry, home-made or store bought

  • Egg wash made from 1 egg beaten with 1 Tbsp water

For the Eggs

  • 10 eggs

  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh chives or green onion

  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or basil

  • 2 tsp snipped fresh tarragon or fresh or dried oregano

  • salt and ground pepper, to taste

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g butter

For the Rest of the Filling

  • 6 large red bell peppers (or use a 16oz jar or two of roasted red peppers)

  • 1 1/2 lbs / 680g spinach

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g olive oil

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter

  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

  • salt and pepper, to taste

  • 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg

  • 8 oz / 225g Swiss cheese

  • 8 oz / 225g smoked turkey or ham

Directions:

Generously grease an 8in / 20cm springform pan.  

Make the Crust

  1. Cut off 1/4 of the puff pastry, cover, and set aside.  

  2. Roll out the remaining pastry to 1/4" thick round.  Be sure to roll it thin enough so it will have a chance to be baked all the way through in the oven.  It should be big enough to cover the bottom and sides of your springform pan with an overhang.  Carefully press into pan, being sure to press all the way into the corners.  Cover and refrigerate.

  3. Roll out the remaining 1/4 of puff pastry until it is 1/4" thick.  Cut out an 8 in / 20cm circle, using an 8 in / 20cm pie plate or cake tin as a template.  Place on a plate or baking sheet, cover, and refrigerate.  

Make the Eggs

  1. Whisk eggs, herbs, salt and pepper together.  Melt butter in a skillet over low heat and pour in eggs.  Gently stir, continuously moving the setting eggs towards the center and allowing runny eggs to reach the bottom of the pan.  When the whole mixture has started to thicken, but still a bit runny, remove from heat and pour onto a plate. Cover and refrigerate and until ready to use.  

Roast the Peppers

Skip this step if you bought roasted red peppers.  

Method 1: Place peppers over an open flame on your stove top until blackened.  Flip and allow second side to roast.  Repeat until all peppers have been roasted.  

Method 2: Place all peppers onto a tinfoil lined sheet pan.  Place under broiler in your oven, checking every few minutes, until peppers are blackened.  Turn peppers over and roast second side.  

Once peppers have been roasted, place in an airtight container or ziploc bag for about 20 minutes to steam.  

Remove peppers and rub the skin off.  Cut out the stems and slice from top to bottom, laying them flat.  Remove seeds and trim away any inside veins.  

Place peppers on a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any excess liquid, cover, and refrigerate.  

Blanch and Sauté the Spinach

  1. Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil.  Add spinach and blanch for 1 minute.  Drain in a colander and rinse in cold water to stop it from cooking.  Press the spinach to remove excess liquid.  

  2. Place oil, butter, and garlic in a large frying pan over medium heat.  When garlic starts to sizzle, add blanched spinach and sauté for 3 minutes.  Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg.  Remove from heat and transfer spinach to a plate lined with paper towels.  Cover and refrigerate until needed.  

Assemble the Tourte

Preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.  

Remove the pastry lined pan from the fridge, along with your eggs, peppers, spinach, cheese, and turkey/ham.  Layer your ingredients in this order, laying them flat and spreading to the edge:

  1. Half of eggs

  2. Half of spinach

  3. Half of turkey/ham

  4. Half of cheese

  5. All the peppers

  6. Other half of cheese

  7. Other half of turkey/ham

  8. Other half of spinach

  9. Other half of eggs

Trim the pastry overhang to within 1 in / 2.5cm of the pan.  Brush the inner side with egg wash and fold over filling.  Brush the other side with more egg wash. 

Remove the round pastry top from fridge, re-rolling if it has shrunk any.  Place over the folded edges of the tourte, pressing down to seal it.  Brush with more egg wash.  Cut a vent in the center of the dough, or use a knife to trace a design.  Or, you can cut out shapes form the puff pastry scraps and decorate the top.  Brush shapes with more egg wash.  Chill assembled tourte in fridge for 30 minutes prior to baking.  

Place tourte on a tinfoil lined baking sheet and bake for 1 hour 10 minutes - 1 hour 30 minutes, or until pastry is puffed and a deep golden brown.  

Cool for 30 minutes before releasing from pan and serving.

Can be assembled a day ahead.  Keep in the refrigerator for up to a week.  To reheat, place in an oven preheated to 350°F / 177°C for 20-30 minutes. 

Jenny's Notes:

The recipe above is pretty traditional, however, it can easily be adjusted to your tastes.  

No soggy bottoms here!

No soggy bottoms here!

  • Before layering in the filling, I suggest sprinkling the bottom with a grated hard cheese, such as parmesan, or bread crumbs, to avoid the soggy-bottom syndrome. I did a combo of cheese and bread crumbs.

  • For the herbed scrambled eggs, chives, parsley, and tarragon combo is more traditional, but I prefer green onion, basil, and oregano. To be completely honest I've never had tarragon, but from what I've read I can't say I have a real desire to.

  • Feel free to use whichever color peppers you like! I roasted multi-colored mini sweet peppers. The white from the eggs (ish), green from the spinach, and red from the peppers is supposed to resemble the colors of the Italian flag, but hey. I'm just making Italy more colorful than it already it is.

  • 1 1/2 lbs of spinach may seem outrageous, but it really cooks down. I have used a scant pound before when that’s all I had, but the spinach is surprisingly delicious and I wouldn’t modify the recipe down if I had a choice.

  • Play around with cheeses! You'll want softer cheeses, ones that melt well. Think cheddar, gruyere, havarti, gouda, brie...I opted for half Swiss and half dill havarti. Two beautiful melting cheeses.

  • I pulled the tourte out of the oven after 1 hour 10 minutes, but it could have used more time to bake the pastry all the way through. It can be difficult to tell as your only clue is the color of the pastry.

Tourte Milanese, Julia Child, Michel Richard, spinach, roasted red peppers, en croute, scrambled eggs, cheese, puff pastry,turkey, Italian flag
breakfast, dinner
Italian, French
Yield: 8-12 Servings
Author:

Tourte Milanese

Layers of turkey, cheese, spinach, roasted red peppers, and eggs encased in flaky puff pastry.
prep time: 1 H & 35 Mcook time: 1 H & 30 Mtotal time: 2 H & 65 M

ingredients:

For the Crust
  • 1 lb. / 450g puff pastry, home-made or store bought
  • Egg wash made from 1 egg beaten with 1 Tbsp water
For the Eggs
  • 10 eggs
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh chives or green onion
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or basil
  • 2 tsp snipped fresh tarragon or fresh or dried oregano
  • salt and ground pepper, to taste
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g butter
For the Rest of the Filling
  • 6 large red bell peppers (or a 16oz jar or two of roasted red peppers)
  • 1 1/2 lbs / 680g spinach
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
  • 8 oz / 225g Swiss cheese
  • 8 oz / 225g smoked turkey or ham

instructions:

How to cook Tourte Milanese

Make the Crust
  1. Generously grease an 8in / 20cm springform pan.
  2. Cut off 1/4 of the puff pastry, cover, and set aside.
  3. Roll out the remaining pastry to 1/4" thick round. Be sure to roll it thin enough so it will have a chance to be baked all the way through in the oven. It should be big enough to cover the bottom and sides of your springform pan with an overhang. Carefully press into pan, being sure to press all the way into the corners. Cover and refrigerate.
  4. Roll out the remaining 1/4 of puff pastry until it is 1/4" thick. Cut out an 8 in / 20cm circle, using an 8 in / 20cm pie plate or cake tin as a template. Place on a plate or baking sheet, cover, and refrigerate.
Make the Eggs
  1. Whisk eggs, herbs, salt and pepper together. Melt butter in a skillet over low heat and pour in eggs. Gently stir, continuously moving the setting eggs towards the center and allowing runny eggs to reach the bottom of the pan. When the whole mixture has started to thicken, but still a bit runny, remove from heat and pour onto a plate. Cover and refrigerate and until ready to use.
Roast the Peppers
  1. Skip this step if you bought roasted red peppers.
  2. Method 1: Place peppers over an open flame on your stove top until blackened. Flip and allow second side to roast. Repeat until all peppers have been roasted.
  3. Method 2: Place all peppers onto a tinfoil lined sheet pan. Place under broiler in your oven, checking every few minutes, until peppers are blackened. Turn peppers over and roast second side.
  4. Once peppers have been roasted, place in an airtight container or ziploc bag for about 20 minutes to steam.
  5. Remove peppers and rub the skin off. Cut out the stems and slice from top to bottom, laying them flat. Remove seeds and trim away any inside veins.
  6. Place peppers on a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any excess liquid, cover, and refrigerate.
Blanch and Sauté the Spinach
  1. Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil. Add spinach and blanch for 1 minute. Drain in a colander and rinse in cold water to stop it from cooking. Press the spinach to remove excess liquid.
  2. Place oil, butter, and garlic in a large frying pan over medium heat. When garlic starts to sizzle, add blanched spinach and sauté for 3 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Remove from heat and transfer spinach to a plate lined with paper towels. Cover and refrigerate until needed.
Assemble the Tourte
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F / 177°C.
  2. Remove the pastry lined pan from the fridge, along with your eggs, peppers, spinach, cheese, and turkey/ham. Layer your ingredients in this order, laying them flat and spreading to the edge:
  3. Half of eggs
  4. Half of spinach
  5. Half of turkey/ham
  6. Half of cheese
  7. All the peppers
  8. Other half of cheese
  9. Other half of turkey/ham
  10. Other half of spinach
  11. Other half of eggs
  12. Trim the pastry overhang to within 1 in / 2.5cm of the pan. Brush the inner side with egg wash and fold over filling. Brush the other side with more egg wash.
  13. Remove the round pastry top from fridge, re-rolling if it has shrunk any. Place over the folded edges of the tourte, pressing down to seal it. Brush with more egg wash. Cut a vent in the center of the dough, or use a knife to trace a design. Or, you can cut out shapes form the puff pastry scraps and decorate the top. Brush shapes with more egg wash. Chill assembled tourte in fridge for 30 minutes prior to baking.
  14. Place tourte on a tinfoil lined baking sheet and bake for 1 hour 10 minutes - 1 hour 30 minutes, or until pastry is puffed and a deep golden brown.
  15. Cool for 30 minutes before releasing from pan and serving.
  16. Can be assembled a day ahead. Keep in the refrigerator for up to a week. To reheat, place in an oven preheated to 350°F / 177°C for 20-30 minutes.

NOTES:

Before layering in the filling, I suggest sprinkling the bottom with a grated hard cheese, such as parmesan, or bread crumbs, to avoid the soggy-bottom syndrome. I did a combo of cheese and bread crumbs. For the herbed scrambled eggs, chives, parsley, and tarragon combo is more traditional, but I prefer green onion, basil, and oregano. To be completely honest I've never had tarragon, but from what I've read I can't say I have a real desire to. Feel free to use whichever color peppers you like! I roasted multi-colored mini sweet peppers. The white from the eggs (ish), green from the spinach, and red from the peppers is supposed to resemble the colors of the Italian flag, but hey. I'm just making Italy more colorful than it already it is. 1 1/2 lbs of spinach may seem like a lot, but it really cooks down. Play around with cheeses! You'll want softer cheeses, ones that melt well. Think cheddar, gruyere, havarti, gouda, brie...I opted for half Swiss and half dill havarti. Two beautiful melting cheeses. I pulled the tourte from the oven after 1 hour 10 minutes, but it could have used more time to bake the pastry all the way through. It can be difficult to tell as your only clue is the color of the pastry.

Calories

653.54

Fat (grams)

44.19

Sat. Fat (grams)

13.43

Carbs (grams)

38.20

Fiber (grams)

4.08

Net carbs

34.12

Sugar (grams)

5.94

Protein (grams)

27.68

Sodium (milligrams)

762.57

Cholesterol (grams)

308.66
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

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Cream Cheese Coffee Cake. Think a delicate crumb, super moist with swirls of cream cheese making the coffee cake even softer, and a sweet crumble on top.

Coffee cakes (and scones) often get a bad rap for being dry. No one likes to eat something that makes their mouth feel like it’s full of sawdust. There is no need to make dry baked goods when there are so many good recipes out there! A good example? This Cream Cheese Coffee Cake recipe. I already have a few favorite NOT dry recipes like this Cinnamon Streusel Coffee Cake, but today’s Cream Cheese Coffee Cake really uh, takes the cake on the moist scale. I apologize if you don’t like the word “moist”, but I struggle finding suitable synonyms that get the same point across. If you have any ideas, I’m open to suggestions so I don’t offend some people’s sensibilities. :)

Now, post Valentine's Day, or Galentine's Day, you may need to take a break from chocolate.  No wait, never mind, that's silly.  Chocolate is always necessary.  What was I thinking?  But I'm sure you already have plenty of chocolate on your hands (maybe literally, put that candy bar down and get busy making this coffee cake) in the form of heart boxes, Dove dark chocolate with those hidden messages, Hershey's kisses, or in my case, Toblerone.  So instead, let's make a very white dessert (or breakfast, hey) with a delicate crumb and cheesecake filling.  Yes? Yes.


Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

Serves 12-16

Ingredients:

For the Filling

  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, softened

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 egg

For the Cake

  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g oil

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 1/2 cup / 123g yogurt or sour cream

For the Streusel

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour

  • 3 Tbsp / 42g cold butter, cubed

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Greased 8x8in / 20x20cm square baking pan.

For the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat cream cheese until smooth, about 30 seconds. 

  2. Add sugar, vanilla, egg and beat on medium-low speed until combined.  Pour into another bowl and set aside. 

For the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. 

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine oil and sugar.  Beat in eggs one at a time.  Add vanilla. 

  3. Alternate adding the dry ingredients and yogurt to the oil and sugar mixture.  Dry, yogurt, dry, yogurt, dry.  Mix only until just combined after each addition. 

For the Streusel

  1. Combine sugar, flour, and butter in a small bowl with a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands until crumbles the size of pebbles appear.

Assembly

  1. Spread half of the cake batter in the bottom of prepared pan. 

  2. Pour and spread cream cheese filling evenly over batter; gently swirl.

  3. Spread remaining half of cake batter over cream cheese filling. 

  4. Evenly sprinkle streusel over the top.

  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean. 

Jenny's Notes:

  • Love coffee cake or serving at a party?  You can double this recipe and bake in a 9x13 inch pan.  Increase baking time to about 40 minutes.

cream cheese, coffee cake, streusel, cream cheese filling, swirl, moist
Breakfast, Dessert
American
Yield: 12-16 Servings
Author:

Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

Super moist coffee cake with a thick cream cheese swirl and delicate streusel topping.
prep time: 45 Mcook time: 25 Mtotal time: 70 M

ingredients:

For the Filling
  • 8 oz / 225g cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
For the Cake
  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g oil
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 cup / 123g yogurt or sour cream
For the Streusel
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 30g all-purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp / 42g cold butter, cubed

instructions:

How to cook Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

For the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat cream cheese until smooth, about 30 seconds.
  2. Add sugar, vanilla, egg and beat on medium-low speed until combined. Pour into another bowl and set aside.
For the Cake
  1. In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine oil and sugar. Beat in eggs one at a time. Add vanilla.
  3. Alternate adding the dry ingredients and yogurt to the oil and sugar mixture. Dry, yogurt, dry, yogurt, dry. Mix only until just combined after each addition.
For the Streusel
  1. Combine sugar, flour, and butter in a small bowl with a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands until crumbles the size of pebbles appear.
Assembly
  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Greased 8x8in / 20x20cm square baking pan.
  2. Spread half of the cake batter in the bottom of prepared pan.
  3. Pour and spread cream cheese filling evenly over batter; gently swirl.
  4. Spread remaining half of cake batter over cream cheese filling.
  5. Evenly sprinkle streusel over the top.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out mostly clean.

NOTES:

Love coffee cake or serving at a party? You can double this recipe and bake in a 9x13 inch pan. Increase baking time to about 40 minutes.

Calories

269.85

Fat (grams)

13.92

Sat. Fat (grams)

6.21

Carbs (grams)

31.96

Fiber (grams)

0.47

Net carbs

31.48

Sugar (grams)

18.21

Protein (grams)

4.58

Sodium (milligrams)

270.60

Cholesterol (grams)

58.08
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Orange Chocolate Chip Scones

Do you know what goes great with cold weather?  Hot beverages, like tea and coffee. 

And do you know which carbs goes best with tea and coffee?  Scones. 

That's not to say that scones are dry and should only be served with hot liquids to help re-salivate your mouth.  If that's your past experience, then you need to find a new scone recipe or scone baker.  I like the sound of that.  Scone baker.  Sconed baker.  The scorned baker.  Maybe not.  Moving on.  These scones are wonderful!!  Light and flaky.  Not too sweet, with a nice burst of citrusy orange that pairs beautifully with the bitterness of the chocolate.

January is for baking.  Not dieting.  (Whole30 I'm looking at you.  In a very kind way.  Maybe not.)  Particularly breads, scones, cookies...winter and carbs are good buddies.  Love handles are an awkward third wheel.  But we get to wear big cozy sweaters and sit by fireplaces if we want to.  I love winter.  I love baking. I love these scones. Without further ado….

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Recipe adapted from Joy the Baker


Orange Chocolate Chip Scones

Makes about 12 scones

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups / 360g all-purpose flour

  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar

  • 4 tsp orange zest

  • 4 1/2 tsp baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1 tsp salt

  • scant 3/4 cup / 150g oil

  • 1 egg

  • 3/4 cup / 180g buttermilk

  • 1 cup / 170g chocolate chips or chunks

Directions:

Oven 425°F / 218°C.  Baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

2019-05-18%2B10.08.01-2.jpg
  1. In a large bowl whisk together flour, sugar, zest, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  Add oil and mix until texture resembles coarse crumbs.

  2. Whisk together egg and buttermilk.  Add to dry mixture until evenly moistened but being careful not to overmix.  Fold in chocolate chips. 

  3. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for a few rounds, 12-14 times.  Roll or pat out into a rectangle of about 1-inch thickness.  Cut into 12 squares.

  4. Place on prepared baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes, until scones no longer look doughy in the center and the bottoms are a light golden brown.  

  5. Best served same day, with tea and coffee and butter and jam, if you wish.   



Jenny's Notes:

  • In place of chocolate chips you can also break up a chocolate bar. Last time I used a chocolate bar with hazelnuts in it for Orange Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Scones and it was scrumptious.

  • Scones are so great, and there are many different varieties and recipes for them.  As long as they aren't too dry, I think they all have merit.  In fact, I have several different scone recipes, this is just one of them.  They are similar, but with slight differences that make each one valuable.

Scones, quick bread, orange, chocolate
bread, breakfast
American, British
Yield: 12 servings
Author:

Orange Chocolate Chip Scones

Light, moist, orange and chocolate chip scones.
prep time: 25 Mcook time: 15 Mtotal time: 40 M

ingredients:

  • 3 cups / 360g all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup / 50g sugar
  • 4 tsp orange zest
  • 4 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • scant 3/4 cup / 150g oil
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup / 180g buttermilk
  • 1 cup / 170g chocolate chips or chunks

instructions:

How to cook Orange Chocolate Chip Scones

  1. Oven 425°F / 218°C. Baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl whisk together flour, sugar, zest, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add oil and mix until texture resembles coarse crumbs.
  3. Whisk together egg and buttermilk. Add to dry mixture until evenly moistened but being careful not to overmix. Fold in chocolate chips.
  4. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for a few rounds, 12-14 times. Roll or pat out into a rectangle of about 1-inch thickness. Cut into 12 squares.
  5. Place on prepared baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes, until scones no longer look doughy in the center and the bottoms are a light golden brown.
  6. Best served same day, with tea and coffee and butter and jam, if you wish.

NOTES:

In place of chocolate chips you can also break up a chocolate bar. Last time I used a chocolate bar with hazelnuts in it for Orange Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Scones and it was scrumptious.

Calories

317.34

Fat (grams)

17.57

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.59

Carbs (grams)

37.50

Fiber (grams)

1.72

Net carbs

35.78

Sugar (grams)

12.69

Protein (grams)

4.72

Sodium (milligrams)

465.72

Cholesterol (grams)

16.10
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Lemon Raspberry Rolls

We all love a good cinnamon roll.  The soft dough, warm-gooey-buttery-cinnamon filling, topped with a sweet glaze or cream cheese icing.  The smell of fresh baked breads wafting from the kitchen and the warmth of bread in our tummy are especially comforting as the months turn colder.  Today, however, we are not making cinnamon rolls (that's old hat) but lemon raspberry rolls.  The tang of the lemon and raspberry paired with the sweet glaze is a match made for breakfast.  Or anytime.  Pair it with a cup of tea or coffee and you have all the incentive you need to get out of bed in the morning!

Lemon Raspberry Rolls

Makes 12 Rolls

Ingredients:

For the Dough

  • 1 cup milk or water
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 4 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 4 1/4 cups all-purpose flour + about 1/2 cup for kneading

For the Lemon Raspberry Filling

  • 1 1/4 cup fresh or frozen raspberries (if using frozen do not thaw)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter

For the Glaze

  • 1 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 3 Tbsp lemon juice

Directions:

Oven 400 Fahrenheit.  Grease a 9x13 in pan.

Make the Dough

In a small saucepan over low heat warm milk until it is about 100 degrees.  Pour milk into a large bowl.  Add the sugar and yeast and allow to sit for 7-10 minutes.  The yeast should foam up a bit. 

Add oil, eggs, zest, and salt.  Add the 4 1/4 cups of flour and mix until combined. 

Flour a clean surface and turn out dough.  Knead for about 8-10 minutes, sprinkling more flour on your work surface as needed.   Dough should be soft and elastic by the end, so don't get too flour-happy. 

Lightly grease or flour a large bowl (the bowl you mixed the dough in is fine) and place dough in the bowl.  Cover with a towel and place in a warm area to rise for 1 1/2 hours or until doubled in size. 

Make the Lemon Raspberry Filling

In a small saucepan melt the butter and let simmer until it starts to brown.  Remove from heat and cool slightly. 

In a medium bowl lightly mix raspberries with sugar, zest, and cornstarch.  It's okay if the raspberries get a little crushed. 

Assemble the Rolls

When the dough has risen, punch it down and turn out onto a lightly floured surface.  Knead for about a minute, then roll into a large rectangle, about 10x20 in.   

Spread cooled butter over dough almost to the edges, then sprinkle evenly with raspberry mixture. 

Starting from one of the longer sides, roll dough into a spiral, pinching the dough together at the end to seal it. 

Cut the log in quarters, then each quarter into 3 slices.  Place the rolls in a 9x13 pan and cover lightly with plastic wrap and a towel.  Place in a warm area to rise for about an hour.  

Bake for 20-22 minutes, until golden on top and centers no longer look doughy. 

Make the Glaze

In a small bowl whisk together powdered sugar and lemon juice.  It should be thin enough to drizzle but not too liquid.  Add more powdered sugar or lemon juice as needed. 

Drizzle warm rolls with glaze. 

Jenny's Notes:

If you don't have a thermometer handy to know what 100 degrees is, simply warm until the milk feels quite warm, but not hot.  It'll be fine!

You can freeze these rolls once you have sliced them and put them in the pan.  Once removed from the freezer allow to thaw and proceed as normal. 

You could always use a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook to knead.  I still recommend kneading it for a few minutes by hand after the machine, I find they are not as thorough as kneading by hand and you want an even rise for your dough.  I usually prefer to do it all by hand.

Healthy Chocolate Chip Banana Cookies

What has chocolate and oats in it, tastes like a cookie, but is sneakily nutritious for you?  These cookies!  Yay for things that taste good and are healthy simultaneously.  And don't forget fun to make!  So many wins, I want to make these all over again.  Instead, I shall have just as much fun writing out the recipe for you. 

Chocolate Chip Banana Cookies

Makes about 30 cookies

Ingredients:

  • about 15 dates (if medjool, you'll need less)
  • 1/4 cup milk almond milk (or milk of choice)
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1 small very ripe banana, mashed
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 12 oz bag semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans (optional)

Directions:

Oven 350 Fahrenheit.

In a blender or food processor, blend dates until very finely chopped.  Slowly add milk and continue to blend until a smooth paste forms.  If using a food processor, be extra careful adding the milk as it may splatter; food processors tend to not have as good of a seal as blenders.  

Add peanut butter, banana, egg, and vanilla to the date paste and beat well. 

In a separate bowl whisk together oats, baking soda, and salt.  Add to date mixture.

Stir in chocolate chips and pecans just until combined.  Refrigerate dough for 15 minutes. 

Drop by spoonful onto cookie sheets lined with parchment paper and bake for 12-15 minutes until edges start to turn lightly golden.  Allow cookies to cool and set a bit before removing from pan. 

Jenny's Notes:

These can easily be made vegan, dairy and/or gluten-free: Make a flax egg instead of a normal egg by adding 1 Tbsp flax powder to 3 Tbsp water, use vegan chocolate chips, use certified GF oats and vanilla extract.  Voila!  Now anyone can eat these delicious morels. 

Adapted from Veggies Don't Bite

Baked Egg Baguettes

Happiness is, a good piece of bread and a stairway in Paris.

Happiness is, a good piece of bread and a stairway in Paris.

"How can you tell how good bread is without tasting it? Not the smell, not the look, but the sound of the crust. Listen. [bread crackles] Oh, symphony of crackle. Only great bread sound this way."             - Colette, Ratatouille

Disclaimer: This is not a bread recipe, but it involves using your favorite crusty bread...think baguettes, with their wonderful crisp outside, soft and chewy inside...oh yes.  I have not been everywhere in the world or tried all the bread, not even close, but of the places I have been, France has the best bread.  And pastries.  And butter.  And lots of other things.  The best part?  You can go to just about any bakery, even the world renowned, and never pay more than 1.50 euro.  That's less than $2 for the world's best bread.  Unfortunately I'm not in France right now, so a package of demi-baguettes will have to do for this recipe. 

Baked Egg Baguettes

Serves 4-8 (depending on if you want to eat a whole mini baguette or cut them in half)

Ingredients:

  • 4 demi-baguettes
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1/4 small white onion, diced
  • 2-3 green onions, chopped
  • 3 oz smoked Gouda cheese, shredded
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

Oven 350 Fahrenheit

Cut out the middle of each baguette, making a V shape, you can pretend like you're carving out a canoe.  Enter inner Pocahontas. 

Whisk together eggs and milk, beating lightly.  Add in onion, green onion, and half of the cheese.  Lightly salt and pepper.  Divide evenly among the baguettes.  Top each with the remaining cheese. 

Place on a baking sheet or dish and bake for 20-25 minutes, until golden and the center is set and slightly puffed up.  Allow to cool for a few minutes, then slice and serve. 

Jenny's Notes:

This is a very quick and easy recipe to execute, and yummy!  You can add or adjust the add ins as you wish.  I also enjoy adding chopped spinach, mushrooms, diced red or green onion, or sun-dried tomatoes.  Also use your favorite cheese for the filling and topping! 

Adapted from Spoon Fork Bacon

Coconut Banana Breakfast Cookies

Everyone wants to eat cookies for breakfast.  And lunch.  And for a snack, and dinner, and second breakfastsies.  If you don't, then you might not want to read this post.  Just...leave quietly.  But before you go, these are no Chips Ahoy. (No judgment there, if that was your breakfast.  In fact, invite me over next time.)  These are delicious and nutritious and with no refined sugar.  Think bananas, coconut, pecans, and apricots with a light tough of maple syrup and oats.  Of course, I practically just gave you the whole ingredient list so let's just get baking, shall we?? 

Coconut Banana Breakfast Cookies

Makes about 15 cookies

Ingredients:

Directions:

  • *1 1/2 cups oats
  • 1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut or flakes
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped pecans
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped almonds
  • 1 Tbsp flax seeds
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots, chopped
  • 3 very ripe bananas, mashed
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Oven 350 Fahrenheit

In a medium bowl, stir together oats, coconut, pecans, flax, salt, and apricots.  Add the bananas, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla until combined.  Spoon generous mounds onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or silpat. 

Bake 23-25 minutes, until lightly golden. 

Some raisins snuck into these ones

Some raisins snuck into these ones

Jenny's Notes:

Recipes like this are great because they can be so easily adapted to your tastes, or simply to change it up.  Feel free to use any kind of nuts you wish, or a combination of several, change up the dried fruit, or use honey instead of maple syrup.  I recommend also trying dried blueberries and dried cherries!

*Most recipes will list whether quick oats, rolled oats, or old-fashioned oats should be used.  You'll notice I don't specify unless I think the recipe really needs a specific kind of oat.  I've found that in most recipes the different kind of oats can be interchanged without affecting the quality of your product.  Just keep in mind that quick oats are more absorbent, so use slightly less than called for if substituting for old-fashioned or rolled, or slightly more rolled if substituting for quick.   

 

Treat Yo'self with Coffee Pancakes and Mocha Syrup

And whipped cream.

I got a little chocolate drizzle happy.  Not to mention this was a time sensitive photo, the first whipped cream mound melted and slipped off the back due to the hot and delicious nature of the pancakes.  Pictured here, whipped cream mound take 2. 

I got a little chocolate drizzle happy.  Not to mention this was a time sensitive photo, the first whipped cream mound melted and slipped off the back due to the hot and delicious nature of the pancakes.  Pictured here, whipped cream mound take 2. 

Some mornings I wake up and oatmeal, fruit, or eggs just aren't going to cut it.  Some mornings call for pancakes.  And some mornings call for pancakes that involve coffee, chocolate, and whipped cream.  The fact that the sun is shining again after a little snowstorm, family is around, it's Spring Break, and Good Friday, might also have had something to do with it.  So I decided to "Treat Yo'self."  Donna Meagle would be proud. 

Last night I watched the final episode of Parks & Recreation.  It was the perfect ending in every sense except that it was just that, the end. Wahhhhhhhh.  Guess I'll just have to start it all over again.  If you've never watched Parks & Rec then stop right where you are and go watch it.  Or better yet, make these delicious pancakes (more like dessert trying to disguise itself as breakfast food, which also happens to be two of my favorite categories of food) and eat them while watching Parks and Rec.  Actually, regardless of if you've ever seen the show or not, that's probably what you should do.  Treat Yo'self.  Even if it's midnight, because breakfast food is appropriate anytime of the day. 

If I had it my way, I would have breakfast for all 3 meals of the day.  Eggs and toast for breakfast, french toast and fruit for lunch, pancakes or waffles for dinner.  But that's not entirely socially acceptable (but we could start a movement!) nor a well-balanced diet, so I save that for Treat Yo'self days

   Alright, enough of the funny talk and let's get down to serious business.

Coffee Pancakes with Mocha Syrup

Makes 2-3 servings, or 6-8 pancakes.

Ingredients:

Mocha Syrup

Make this first so it has time to cool and your pancakes don't get cold!

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 Tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp corn starch
  • 2 Tbsp strong brewed coffee
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Combine all ingredients except vanilla in small saucepan.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until boiling.  Reduce heat to low and boil for 5 minutes.

Remove from heat and add vanilla.  Allow to cool while you make the pancakes.  Store leftovers in the fridge for up to 1 month.  Sugar is a wonderful preservative.  I'm going to live so long. 

Whipped Cream

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a hand held mixer, beat cream until soft peaks form.  Add sugar and vanilla, beat until stiff peaks appear.

Coffee Pancakes

Make these last so they will be nice and hot when you serve them!

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground espresso, or freshly ground coffee (sometimes I use the contents of a Nespresso capsule)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk of choice, or water
  • 2 Tbsp oil of choice, or melted butter or coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat lightly greased griddle or pan to 350 Fahrenheit.

In a medium bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, and ground espresso. 

Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the egg, milk, oil, and vanilla.  Stir until just moistened, some lumps will remain.  If you prefer thinner pancakes, you may add more milk.  Allow to sit for a few minutes.

Pour about 1/4 cup of batter onto hot griddle, allow to cook 1-2 minutes on each side, either until light golden-brown or when the air bubbles pop, but don't fill in immediately.  If the first pancakes seem too thick or too thin, add more milk or flour, respectively, until desired consistency is reached.  Repeat with remaining batter. 

Any leftover batter or pancakes can be stored in the refrigerator for about 1-2 days.  They can be reheated on the griddle or pan, microwave (boo), or my favorite way, the toaster. 

Assembly:

Place pancakes on a plate.  If desired, butter each pancake.  Drizzle generously with mocha syrup and top with copious amounts of whipped cream. And maybe drizzle with more syrup.  Don't forgot a complementary cup of coffee.  Complementary as in it goes with it nicely, not I'm giving you a complimentary cup of coffee.  I would totally give you a free cup of coffee, but, you're reading a blog right now, and this is only 2016.  Maybe by 2038 when Leslie Knope is President, I can send you coffee over the interwebs. 

Adapted from Pastry Affair

And Happy Good Friday.  This morning I kept thinking to myself "Black Friday" but that is quite the opposite of what today is.  No consumerism today.  A day to reflect on Jesus as He took our place on the cross.  The least deserving and only perfect man to walk the earth, bearing the wrath and punishment of separation from God the Father so that we might never have to.  Instead, He cloaks us in His righteousness so that we might receive the love of the Father freely.  Hallelujah, what a Savior.