Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

IMG_5063.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Let me take a gander at what you're thinking, probably something like, "OH! PEANUT BUTTER PIE? I love peanut butter pie! So good! But I already have a recipe for peanut butter pie. Why do I need this recipe? Wait, don't YOU already have a recipe up on this blog for peanut butter pie??" Maybe? Well, you'd be right about one thing, this is not my first recipe up for a peanut butter pie.  But let me tell you, they each have their own merited place in your recipe box.  For example, the Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream has a shortbread crust, creamy peanut butter filling, topped with chocolate whipped cream.  Perfect for casual events, potlucks, birthdays, summer evenings, Sunday afternoons...but what happens if you need a peanut butter pie for a gala? The president is coming over?  You're presenting a peanut butter pie to the CEO of Godiva chocolate and want chocolate to be showcased more prominently?  Then you need a peanut butter pie with refinement, elegance, and classy chocolate utilized in more than one element of the pie.  How do you do this without compromising the stand-alone peanut butter filling of a peanut butter pie?  Why, you change out the shortbread crust for a chocolate crust, and top the pie with flowing chocolate ganache.  Elegance.  Refinement.  The chocolate ganache envelopes the peanut butter filling in a tender embrace...still with me?  Ok let's stop dreaming and comparing peanut butter pies and MAKE one!  

Not a fan of chocolate and peanut butter together? Neither is my mom.  That's ok, I still love you.  And because of that, why not head over to this Nutter Butter Pie instead? No chocolate there! 

Recipe adapted from what megan's making.


Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

For the Chocolate Crust

  • 7.5 oz / 210g chocolate graham crackers, teddy grahams, or chocolate shortbread

  • 2 oz / 55g (1/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or mini chips

  • 5 Tbsp / 65g butter, melted

For the Peanut Butter Filling

IMG_5030.JPG
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 8 oz / 227g mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1 cup / 250g peanut butter

  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar

  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract

For the Chocolate Ganache

  • 4 oz / 110g (2/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or chips

  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter

  • 1/2 cup / 118g heavy whipping cream

Directions:

Oven 325°F / 163°C.  Ungreased 9in / 23cm pie dish.  

Make the Chocolate Crust

  1. In a food processor combine chocolate grahams, butter, and chocolate chips.  Pulse until the mixture is uniformly fine crumbs.  Or do it the "old fashioned" way and beat the crumbs to oblivion in a well sealed plastic bag with a rolling pin or other hard object, then mixing in the chocolate and butter in a bowl with a spoon. 

  2. Press evenly into the bottom and sides of pie dish and bake for 8 minutes or until fragrant.  Set aside to cool completely.

Make the Peanut Butter Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, beat the whipping cream until stiff peaks form.  Transfer to another bowl if using a stand mixer and set aside.

  2. Again in the bowl of a stand mixer or a separate bowl with a handheld mixer, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter, sugar, and vanilla until light and fluffy.  

  3. Carefully fold the whipped cream into the peanut butter mixture in three or four parts.  

  4. Spoon the filling over the cooled crust and smooth the top.  Refrigerate to set.  

IMG_5064.JPG

Make the Chocolate Ganache

  1. Place the chocolate and butter in a small bowl.  Heat the cream in a small saucepan over low heat, just until simmering.  The moment you see bubbles remove from heat and pour over chocolate and butter.  Let sit for 1 minute to melt the chocolate, then whisk briskly until smooth and shiny.  

  2. Pour over chilled pie.  If you don't desire chocolate running over the sides, you may have to wait a minute or two between pourings, or simply don't use all the ganache.  (The rest can be disposed of with a spoon and a mouth.  But I don't need to tell you that.)  

  3. Chill for 3-4 hours or overnight until set.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If using a shallow pie dish you may have some leftover crust, and that's ok. Don't feel like you have to use all the crust mixture or you may have an impenetrable crust, especially in the corners.

  • I frequently substitute whole milk or coconut milk for all or part of the cream in ganache, but usually not when it's a topper as it can separate a bit if you don't use all cream. However, one time when making this I only had 1/4 cup cream left for the topping and so added 1/4 cup whole milk, and it made for a beautiful ganache, even as the topper.

  • Top with chocolate chips or chocolate shavings as desired!

American
Yield: 8-12
Author:

Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Chocolate cookie crust, whipped mascarpone peanut butter filling, and chocolate ganache to top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 8 Mtotal time: 1 H & 8 M

ingredients:

For the Chocolate Crust
  • 7.5 oz / 210g chocolate graham crackers, teddy grahams, or chocolate shortbread
  • 2 oz / 55g (1/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or mini chips
  • 5 Tbsp / 65g butter, melted
For the Peanut Butter Filling
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 8 oz / 227g mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup / 250g peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup / 100g sugar
  • 1 tsp / 5g vanilla extract
For the Chocolate Ganache
  • 4 oz / 110g (2/3 cup) semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped, or chips
  • 1 Tbsp / 14g butter
  • 1/2 cup / 118g heavy whipping cream

instructions:

How to cook Mascarpone Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Ganache

Make the Chocolate Crust
  1. Oven 325°F / 163°C. Ungreased 9in / 23cm pie dish.
  2. In a food processor combine chocolate grahams, butter, and chocolate chips. Pulse until the mixture is uniformly fine crumbs. Or do it the "old fashioned" way and beat the crumbs to oblivion in a well sealed plastic bag with a rolling pin or other hard object, then mixing in the chocolate and butter in a bowl with a spoon.
  3. Press evenly into the bottom and sides of pie dish and bake for 8 minutes or until fragrant. Set aside to cool completely.
Make the Peanut Butter Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, beat the whipping cream until stiff peaks form. Transfer to another bowl if using a stand mixer and set aside.
  2. Again in the bowl of a stand mixer or a separate bowl with a handheld mixer, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter, sugar, and vanilla until light and fluffy.
  3. Carefully fold the whipped cream into the peanut butter mixture in three or four parts.
  4. Spoon the filling over the cooled crust and smooth the top. Refrigerate to set.
Make the Chocolate Ganache
  1. Place the chocolate and butter in a small bowl. Heat the cream in a small saucepan over low heat, just until simmering. The moment you see bubbles remove from heat and pour over chocolate and butter. Let sit for 1 minute to melt the chocolate, then whisk briskly until smooth and shiny.
  2. Pour over chilled pie. If you don't desire chocolate running over the sides, you may have to wait a minute or two between pourings, or simply don't use all the ganache. (The rest can be disposed of with a spoon and a mouth. But I don't need to tell you that.)
  3. Chill for 3-4 hours or overnight until set.

NOTES:

If using a shallow pie dish you may have some leftover crust, and that's ok. Don't feel like you have to use all the crust mixture or you may have an impenetrable crust, especially in the corners. I frequently substitute whole milk or coconut milk for all or part of the cream in ganache, but usually not when it's a topper as it can separate a bit if you don't use all cream. However, one time when making this I only had 1/4 cup cream left for the topping and so added 1/4 cup whole milk, and it made for a beautiful ganache, even as the topper. Top with chocolate chips or chocolate shavings as desired!

Calories

791.91

Fat (grams)

62.46

Sat. Fat (grams)

30.79

Carbs (grams)

54.43

Fiber (grams)

3.89

Net carbs

50.53

Sugar (grams)

37.64

Protein (grams)

12.12

Sodium (milligrams)

502.22

Cholesterol (grams)

110.56
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 8 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
IMG_5066.JPG

 

Classic Tiramisù: The Real Deal.

IMG_4530.jpg

This post contains affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

As in, I could just copy and paste the original recipe in Italian, and we could all follow the pretty pictures to make it.  That doesn't sound very reliable to me, so I shall do my best to translate it.  Maybe also not very reliable.  My point is, this is a good, sound, Italian written recipe of Tiramisù.  Raw eggs, real mascarpone (pronounced mas-car-pohn-AY no matter what those chefs on Food Network say.  I cry a little on the inside when people insist on saying mars-cah-pone.  There is no R before the C. Mas-car-pone is acceptable, as that would be how to say it in English.  But deep down we all want to be a bit more Italian, no?) no cream cheese involved.  It's so simple, and the ingredients are few.  Mascarpone can be quite expensive in the States, which is why many substitute cream cheese, but it is so worth the splurge.  If you do feel the need to use cream cheese, (I don't know, maybe your 3 year-old wants tiramisù for a birthday party of 50??) then maybe don't call it tiramisù, call it something else.  Tiramigiù, maybe.  :)

Just like any replication, it will never be as good as in the place where it was founded and crafted and came to fame.  Some of the best mascarpone will be found here in Italy, and at much cheaper costs.  In fact, it's cheaper than cream cheese. Even if you take the exact same method and make mascarpone in another country, those cows will be different cows, who eat different sustenance, and produce milk that tastes different .  Not to mention if the first time you ever tried tiramisù was on your first trip to Italy, surrounded by cobblestone streets, freshly hung laundry on the corner, magnificent old buildings, and the too-loud Italian conversations and even louder hand gestures whirling about, that is something very hard to replicate in anywhere but Italy.  

That said, this is the best recipe for Tiramisù I have yet found.  No, it's not from a wonderful Italian nonna (grandma) I know from down the street or a recipe handed down for generations in one of my friend's families, but I did listen to a podcast once in Italian where a girl was making tiramisù with a nonna and it was essentially the same as the one I'm about to share with you.  That counts, right? Ok, andiamo! (Let's go!) 

Original recipe in Italian, with video and step by step photos, on GialloZafferano.


Tiramisù

Serves 12-15

Ingredients:

  • 220g / about 4 medium eggs, as fresh as you can get them

  • 100g / 1/2 cup sugar

  • 500g mascarpone

  • 300g / about 1 medium package Savoiardi (lady fingers)

  • 300g / 1 1/4 cup brewed coffee from a Moka pot or very strong coffee, sweetened to taste and cooled

  • Cocoa powder for dusting the top

Directions:

IMG_4520.JPG
  1. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, placing the yolks in the bowl of a stand mixer and setting aside the egg whites, or placing them in two medium bowls if you plan on using an electric hand mixer. 

  2. Beat the yolks, slowly adding half the sugar.  

  3. When the mixture becomes light and frothy, beat in the mascarpone, a little at a time.  Once all the mascarpone is beat in, you should have a dense and creamy mixture.  

  4. Clean the beaters well or transfer mascarpone mixture to another bowl and clean the stand mixer bowl and beater.  Beat the egg whites, slowly adding in the rest of the sugar.  Beat until stiff peaks form.

  5. Add one spoonful of the beaten whites to the mascarpone mixture, stirring energetically with a spatula, to begin to lighten it.  Then continue adding the egg whites, folding in delicately one spoonful at a time, until all has been incorporated. 

  6. In a 30x20cm / 8x11in pan, spoon about 1/3 of the cream mixture into the bottom and spread evenly.  Place your cold coffee in a shallow bowl or dish.  Dip your savoiardi in the coffee for a few seconds and place in rows over the cream until an even layer has been established.  

  7. Spoon another third of cream evenly over the savoiardi and repeat another layer of coffee soaked savoiardi.  Top with the remaining cream and smooth evenly.  

  8. Dust with cocoa powder using a sieve and refrigerate for a few hours before serving.             

Buon Appetito!

Jenny's Notes:

IMG_4524.jpg
  • Most grocery stores and supermarkets carry mascarpone and lady fingers in the States, mascarpone being with the cheese or special cheese, lady fingers I had to look in the "imported" section.

  • Remember that in order to beat egg whites there must not be any trace of egg yolk or grease or they won't beat up properly.

  • One way to tell if your egg whites have been properly beaten is to hold the bowl upside down. The egg whites shouldn't move. Of course, at this point you should already be confident that your whites are stiff enough so you don't end up with, um, egg whites everywhere. It is possible to overbeat egg whites, so don't over do it or they become dry.

  • The Italians making this recipe said they added only 1 tsp of sugar to the coffee, I don't usually add any. If you prefer sweeter desserts, you may decide to add more.

  • If you don't have a 30x20cm / 8x11in pan on hand, you can use a 9x13in. Or halve the recipe and use an 8x8in / 20x20cm or 9x9in.

  • When dipping the Savoiardi I found 4-5 seconds to be ideal. Any less and the coffee didn't soak all the way through, any more and the cookies became over-saturated and broke. When you start running out of coffee you may need to dip one side of the cookie and then the other to get an even soak.

  • Some say it's almost a sin if you cut into the tiramisù if it has been in the fridge for any less than 24 hours. I think it's optimal after just a few hours, and best if eaten within a few days.

  • Can be frozen for up to 2 weeks.

Italian
Yield: 12-15
Author:

Classic Tiramisù

Recipe for the classic Italian tiramisù with savoiardi (ladyfingers), mascarpone, raw eggs, and not too much sugar. Translated from Italian.
prep time: 45 Mcook time: total time: 45 M

ingredients:

  • 220g / about 4 medium eggs, as fresh as you can get them
  • 100g / 1/2 cup sugar
  • 500g mascarpone
  • 300g / about 1 medium package Savoiardi (lady fingers)
  • 300g / 1 1/4 cup brewed coffee from a Moka pot or very strong coffee, sweetened to taste and cooled
  • Cocoa powder for dusting the top

instructions:

How to cook Classic Tiramisù

  1. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, placing the yolks in the bowl of a stand mixer and setting aside the egg whites, or placing them in two medium bowls if you plan on using an electric hand mixer.
  2. Beat the yolks, slowly adding half the sugar.
  3. When the mixture becomes light and frothy, beat in the mascarpone, a little at a time. Once all the mascarpone is beat in, you should have a dense and creamy mixture.
  4. Clean the beaters well or transfer mascarpone mixture to another bowl and clean the stand mixer bowl and beater. Beat the egg whites, slowly adding in the rest of the sugar. Beat until stiff peaks form.
  5. Add one spoonful of the beaten whites to the mascarpone mixture, stirring energetically with a spatula, to begin to lighten it. Then continue adding the egg whites, folding in delicately one spoonful at a time, until all has been incorporated.
  6. In a 30x20cm / 8x11in pan, spoon about 1/3 of the cream mixture into the bottom and spread evenly. Place your cold coffee in a shallow bowl or dish. Dip your savoiardi in the coffee for a few seconds and place in rows over the cream until an even layer has been established.
  7. Spoon another third of cream evenly over the savoiardi and repeat another layer of coffee soaked savoiardi. Top with the remaining cream and smooth evenly.
  8. Dust with cocoa powder using a sieve and refrigerate for a few hours before serving.

NOTES:

Remember that in order to beat egg whites there must not be any trace of egg yolk or grease or they won't beat up properly. One way to tell if your egg whites have been properly beaten is to hold the bowl upside down. The egg whites shouldn't move. Of course, at this point you should already be confident that your whites are stiff enough so you don't end up with, um, egg whites everywhere. It is possible to overbeat egg whites, so don't over do it or they become dry. The Italians making this recipe said they added only 1 tsp of sugar to the coffee, I don't usually add any. If you prefer sweeter desserts, you may decide to add more. If you don't have a 30x20cm / 8x11in pan on hand, you can use a 9x13in. Or halve the recipe and use an 8x8in / 20x20cm or 9x9in. When dipping the Savoiardi I found 4-5 seconds to be ideal. Any less and the coffee didn't soak all the way through, any more and the cookies became over-saturated and broke. When you start running out of coffee you may need to dip one side of the cookie and then the other to get an even soak. Some say it's almost a sin if you cut into the tiramisù if it has been in the fridge for any less than 24 hours. I think it's optimal after just a few hours, and best if eaten within a few days. Can be frozen for up to 2 weeks.

Calories

327.99

Fat (grams)

20.59

Sat. Fat (grams)

11.84

Carbs (grams)

9.97

Fiber (grams)

0.08

Net carbs

9.88

Sugar (grams)

9.38

Protein (grams)

3.90

Sodium (milligrams)

202.45

Cholesterol (grams)

111.33
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
I have somehow never managed to get a photo after it has been dug into. And I couldn't take photos before, because, well, Christmas and other events. "Who broke into the dessert early?!?!" I never would've hear the end of it.

I have somehow never managed to get a photo after it has been dug into. And I couldn't take photos before, because, well, Christmas and other events. "Who broke into the dessert early?!?!" I never would've hear the end of it.


Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream

Shortbread crust.  A layer of creamy peanut butter filling.  Topped with a mountain of chocolate whipped cream.  And chocolate shavings.  Because, we're so fancy, you already know.  Did I mention No-Bake?

I first made this pie with a pretzel crust.  The salty sweetness really off-set the creamy full-bodied mouth feel of the layers well.  Yes, sometimes I describe dessert and food like wine.  It just works so well.  But if you ever catch me saying "I prefer the '98 vintage of this cheesecake" or something along that line, I might have taken it too far.  Ew, rancid cheesecake.  Anyway...

The next time I made this pie was in Italy.  Pretzels do exist here, but they have a very strange texture.  Think pretzels that went stale and chewy and then got so stale they got crispy again, almost. But still a little chewy.  And don't chop well in a food processor. It took over 8 minutes to get them partly broken up.  The crust was still good, but it looked more like a bird's nest of pretzel sticks than a uniform crust.  

Oh hey, Thanksgiving pie.  And there is Lucia the poinsettia in the background.  Good times, good times.

Oh hey, Thanksgiving pie.  And there is Lucia the poinsettia in the background.  Good times, good times.

Regardless, all the Americans in Italy are so peanut butter deprived that everyone loved it.  In fact, two days later was Thanksgiving and it was requested of me to make and bring this pie to Thanksgiving dinner.  Not pecan pie.  Not pumpkin pie.  Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream.  With a delicious but slightly strange looking crust.  

When I made the pie this time, I used shortbread cookies with great success.  The Italian supermarkets have practically a whole aisle devoted to all their different kinds of shortbread cookies, called frollini.  A nice big 800g bag for 1.5-2.5 euros?  Hehe don't mind if I do.  Shortbread with cream, with chocolate and stars, with buckwheat, with almond, with almond and chocolate, with hazelnut, stuffed with apricot, stuffed with chocolate, with coarse sugar, with egg, chocolate drops...just to name a few. 

Someday I will share with you the pretzel crust, but when I have access again to pretzels that behave in a food processor and get can get some decent photos.  But until then, get your hands on some shortbread cookies.  You could make some homemade (classic shortbread consists of just 3 ingredients: flour, butter, sugar) or if you're in the States buy some Sandie's shortbread cookies or something similar. 

Peanut Butter Pie with Chocolate Whipped Cream

Ingredients:

For the Shortbread Crust

  • 15 shortbread cookies
  • 4 Tbsp butter, melted

For the Peanut Butter Filling

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone or cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar

For the Chocolate Whipped Cream

  • 100g or roughly 4 oz good quality dark chocolate, chopped
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • Extra chocolate in bar form, for chocolate shavings

Directions:

Make the Chocolate Whipped Cream First

Place a small amount of water in a pan and place on the stove over low heat.  Place chocolate and whipping cream in a bowl that will rest on the pan but without touching the water.  This is a make shift double-boiler.  Feel free to use a real double boiler if you have one. 

Gently stir until chocolate is mostly melted.  Remove from heat and continue stirring until chocolate is completely melted.  Place in the refrigerator for 2 hours. 

Make the Shortbread Crust

In a food processor, pulse cookies until they become crumbly.  Add butter and pulse until smooth and can be pressed into a crust.  Depending on the type of cookies you chose to use, you may need to add a touch more melted butter to ensure the crust will stay together.  Press into a 9 in pie plate and refrigerate.

Make the Peanut Butter Filling

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, whip heavy cream until stiff peaks form.  Transfer to another bowl. 

Again, in the bowl of the stand mixer beat mascarpone, peanut butter, and brown sugar together until smooth.  Gently fold in the whipped cream with a spatula.  Pour filling over crust and return to the refrigerator. 

Assembly

Once the chocolate cream is cooled, beat with a stand mixer or handheld mixer until stiff peaks form.  Remove pie from the refrigerator and spread or pipe chocolate whipped cream over the top. 

Using a vegetable peeler or knife, shave a chocolate bar over the pie for the finishing touch. 

Jenny's Notes:

Try using Nutella or Biscoff spread instead of peanut butter.  YUM.

Adapted from Cooking Channel

Amaretto Mascarpone Coffee Cake

Guest Photography featuring Bailey Shoemaker

Guest Photography featuring Bailey Shoemaker

When my roommate Rachel moved back to the States at the at the end of June, it wasn't possible to take everything with her.  Some things got left behind, and I got to inherit them.  Dishes? Yay, I don't have to eat off my hands.  Laundry hamper?  Keeping all the dirty clothes in one place, I like it.  Coffee grinder?  Yahoo, fresh ground coffee in the morning!  And a of bottle Disaronno?? Oh, joy! What baking adventures lie before us, my sweet (literally), Italian made, amaretto flavored, almond liqueur? Maybe cupcakes, coffee cake, and cookies, oh my! 

Today, coffee cake.  With a layer of slightly sweet mascarpone in the middle to balance the sweetness of the Disaronno and oatmeal crumble on top. 

Amaretto Mascarpone Coffee Cake

Ingredients:

For the Cake

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 1 whole egg + 1 egg white
  • 1/4 cup amaretto
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk or sour milk

For the Mascarpone Filling

  • 8 oz mascarpone, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 egg yolk

For the Oat Streusel

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup oats
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature

Directions:

Oven 325 Fahrenheit.  Grease well either an 8 in. spring-form or 8x8 pan. 

Make the cake

In a large bowl or in the bowl of an electric mixer, combine flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.  Add oil and mix until crumbly.  Add eggs, milk, and amaretto and beat until smooth. 

Pour half of this batter into prepared pan.  Set remaining half aside while you make the mascarpone filling.

Make the Mascarpone Filling

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a handheld mixer, beat mascarpone, sugar, and yolk just until creamy.  Pour over cake batter in pan and carefully spread to the edges. 

Pour remaining cake batter over mascarpone filling and spread to the edges. 

Make the Oat Streusel

In a bowl combine flour, sugar, oats, and salt.  Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter, fork, or clean hands.  Combine until coarse crumbs form.  Evenly crumble over the top of the cake batter.

Bake for 25-30 minutes or until center is almost set but still has a slight jiggle to it.  Allow to cool completely before slicing and serving. 

I suggest serving (to the adults, of course!) with hot coffee with a splash of milk and amaretto...your very own caffè corretto!  Caffè corretto means "corrected coffee."  Because we all know, coffee without alcohol isn't correct...haha.

Jenny's Notes:

Don't have mascarpone on hand, but do have cream cheese?  They can usually be substituted for each other, and certainly in this case if you wish.  Mascarpone is a decadently creamy Italian cheese, a touch thicker than cream cheese, but it is the same price here as the cream cheese, if not cheaper.  Despite what you've probably heard most of your life, even sadly from chefs and cooks on TV, it is not pronounced mas-car-pone nor mars-cah-pone, but mas-car-pone-NAY.  Let that Italian fly free and pronounce that hard E at the end!

You can get creative with what type of liqueur or liquor you use in this coffee cake!  Bailey's, rum, Kahlua, Triple Sec...

Adapted from Call Me PMc

White Russian Tart

Mmmmm I love me a White Russian.  Or a Black Russian.  Or you can just give me the Kahlua.  But you know what I love more?  This tart.  Not to mention it is raw, gluten-free, refined-sugar free, and somehow delicious.  Nah I'm just kidding, there a lot of really delicious healthier desserts and foods out there, but the ones that aren't so much tend to get the attention and give the above labels a bad rap. 

When I'm experimenting and trying new recipes in the "healthy" department (as defined by trying to limit refined-sugars or flours, using a vegetable or bean or something that doesn't normally go in that there fudge brownie) I look for the 3 different categories of reactions from my tasters.  I tend to like some very strange things so I can't always judge by whether I like it or not...  Unsweetened cocoa powder by the spoonful, anyone??

  1. The category of "This is honest deliciousness."  When people ask for a recipe or have no idea that there are chickpeas or spinach powder hidden in what they're eating.  Something a normal or even picky eater would eat. 
  2. The category of "It's good for a healthy dessert!"  So it's palatable and they're not gagging, but most would still take a slice of cheesecake over it.  
  3. The category of "I would rather just eat a salad."  If I'm tempted to remedy the taste by adding cups and cups of maple syrup, then when that isn't strong enough, real sugar, it's probably beyond saving.  I know it's bad if I don't even like it.  No worries, those recipes won't come anywhere near this blog. 

This tart is a solid category 1.  Even my mom and brother approved this, and they keep me pretty honest when it comes to healthy desserts. 

I bounce back and forth between decadent desserts and healthier desserts.  I have a love and respect for both, and each have their place and time.  Some days it's honey, nuts, and coconut oil, and other days it's sugar, heavy whipping cream, and butter.  Variety is the spice of life.  Today, it's dates, avocado, and mascarpone.

White Russian Tart

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

Crust

  • 1 1/2 cups almonds
  • 2 Tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 8-10 dates
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Chocolate Vodka Cream

  • 1/4 cup coconut oil (virgin, unrefined)
  • 1 Tbsp finely ground coffee beans
  • 1 large ripe avocado, peeled and sliced
  • 3 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp vodka
  • 1 tsp rum or Kahlua (of course the Kahlua option adds sugar)
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup

Mascarpone Cream

  • 8 oz mascarpone cheese
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Make the Crust

In a food processor, combine almonds and coconut and pulse until small crumbles.  Add dates, vanilla, cocoa powder, and salt.  Process until well combined. 

Press into the bottom of a 8 or 9 inch spring-form pan or pie plate.

Make the Chocolate Vodka Cream

Heat coconut oil in small pan over low heat until liquefied.  Combine the melted coconut oil, coffee, avocado, cocoa powder, vodka, rum or Kahlua, and maple syrup in a food processor until smooth.  Stop and scrape down sides and bottom occasionally.  Spread over crust and place in freezer for about 30 minutes.

Make the Mascarpone Cream

Shortly before taking tart out of the freezer, combine mascarpone, maple syrup, and vanilla in a small bowl.  Take the tart out of the freezer and spread mascarpone mixture over it.  Place in fridge for about 2 hours before serving.   

Jenny's Notes:

This tart is not very sweet and really lets the mascarpone shine through.  However, if you or your guests prefer things a little on the sweeter side, feel free to add more maple syrup in either of the creams. 

Also, I like to use black cocoa powder in this recipe.  Sounds ghastly, but it's the stuff of Oreos.  (I didn't know the flavor of Oreo was supposed to be chocolate until I was an adult, but they get their unique flavor from black cocoa.)  If you can get your hands on it, it's really great.  I usually order it from Amazon. 

Adapted from The Clean Dish