Jeannie's Healthy Breakfast Cookies

2019-02-17+15.32.23.jpg

What could be better than a cookie? How about a cookie that’s packed with nutrients and can be eaten anytime, especially for breakfast, guilt free?

I love cookies. They are my go-to when I want to whip up something with limited time, or don’t have much energy for other more entailed desserts. I’m sure this has NOTHING to do with the fact that cookies are also one of my favorite things to eat. It ends up turning into a win-win-win situation because I’m having fun, being productive, get to eat some of the ingredients while baking, get to eat some dough while baking, and BONUS if there is enough dough to actually be baked into cookies! So many wins.

I have to bring up the negative, however, to classic cookie baking. They’re kinda calorific and not very good for you. I’m all for eating cookies for breakfast, but that usually goes along with a sugar crash later on. What to do?

Bake healthy cookies! They have to be delicious of course, and not gross. I have just the recipe for you, made up by my mom many years ago when we needed a portable nutritious breakfast for a trip. This recipe has been in my recipe box ever since as “Jean’s breakfast cookies”, made with many adjustments because the add ins are very versatile depending on your tastes. My mom likes to be called Jeannie (not by her kids of course) so I adapted the title accordingly.

One thing this recipe is not is a taste-alike recipe to say, chocolate chip cookies with a surprise twist that it’s healthy. Nope, these cookies have a satisfyingly healthy look and taste and are upfront about it from the get go. They get positive feedback and recipe requests wherever they go!

The recipe that follows is just one version of many, many possibilities. Just keep in mind that major adjustments may need other adjustments. For example, if you don’t have any honey or maple syrup on hand for the sweetener, you could use raw or regular cane sugar. Substituting a liquid for a dry ingredient, however, will mean you may need more liquid from elsewhere. Maybe add another egg, a bit more oil, or even water until you get a cookie dough consistency once again. Other ideas to make the recipe your own:

  • Use any kind of flour you wish instead of wheat flour. Oat flour, almond flour, coconut flour…I often use wheat germ in place of part of the flour or flaxmeal, usually 1/4 cup.

  • If you want these cookies to be gluten-free, ensure that your oats are gluten-free, and use a gluten-free flour.

  • Change up the spices. Sometimes towards fall I also add a bit of ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Cardamom is also nice.

  • Beyond dried fruit and walnuts, get creative with your add-ins! Just try not to go too far beyond 1 cup, otherwise there might not be enough dough to hold everything together. In the photos on this post I used dried apples, dried cranberries, and walnuts. I’ve also added various combinations of dried cherries, prunes, dried apricots, raisins, dates, dried figs, dried pears, fresh apples, grated coconut, pecans, hazelnuts, dark chocolate, crystallized ginger, and anything else I had on hand!

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from my mama


Jeannie’s Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Makes about 18-22 cookies

Ingredients:

2019-02-17 14.45.17.jpg
  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive or coconut oil

  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 eggs

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour

  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats

  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped

  • 1/2 apple, diced

  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.

  1. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.

  2. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.

  3. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.

  4. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

Jenny’s Notes:

  • you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder.

  • olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil.

  • 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

healthy, nutritious, cookies, gluten-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free, dried fruit, apple, fall spices, oats, nuts, coconut, portable
breakfast, dessert, snack
American
Yield: 12-16 cookies
Author:

Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

Healthy cookies packed with nutritious ingredients that make for a great breakfast or anytime snack. Dairy-free, refined sugar-free, and can easily be made gluten-free.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: 10 Mtotal time: 30 M

ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup / 112g olive oil or coconut oil
  • generous 1/3 cup / 120g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup / 120g all-purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups / 135g rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup / 90g flaxmeal
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup / 105g nuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 apple, diced
  • 1/4 cup / 50g dried fruit, chopped if necessary

instructions:

How to cook Jeannie's Breakfast Cookies

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Baking sheet lined with silpat or parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl combine wet ingredients: oil, maple syrup, eggs, and vanilla; beat with a spoon until smooth.
  3. In another medium bowl whisk together dry ingredients: flour, oats, flaxmeal, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
  4. Add dry ingredients, nuts, apple, and dried fruit to wet ingredients, mix until well combined.
  5. Spoon generous tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheet and flatten slightly as they won’t spread much, leaving at least 1 inch between cookies. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges turn lightly golden brown and centers are no longer doughy.

NOTES:

you can make flaxmeal at home by simply processing some flaxseeds in a coffee or spice grinder. olive oil has a rather strong taste so if you prefer to avoid that, try going with the coconut oil option or even a neutral oil like peanut oil. 3 egg whites can be substituted for the 2 eggs for cholesterol-conscience people.

Calories

265.40

Fat (grams)

15.87

Sat. Fat (grams)

2.49

Carbs (grams)

27.23

Fiber (grams)

3.34

Net carbs

23.89

Sugar (grams)

9.53

Protein (grams)

5.72

Sodium (milligrams)

188.36

Cholesterol (grams)

31.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 12 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator
2019-02-17+15.36.02.jpg

Buttermilk Bread

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when someone says, "Buttermilk"?  

For me, that would be buttermilk pancakes.  The lightest and fluffiest of all pancakes.  If you live in the south, maybe that's buttermilk biscuits.  Maybe your favorite cake recipe or scone recipe calls for buttermilk.  Whatever it may be, these delectable food items all have one thing in common:  Their light crumb, a.k.a. fluffiness.  The high acidity in the buttermilk reacts with the leavening agent, like baking soda, thus creating a beautiful rise, and a nice, light product.  

I don't often have buttermilk on hand; I find it much easier to make my own as I always have milk and lemon juice/vinegar on hand.  Lemon juice or vinegar are both very acidic and will have a similar effect on the leavening agent.  However, there is something so satisfying about using true buttermilk in a recipe.  After all, Milk and Lemon Juice Pancakes don't sound nearly as appealing as Buttermilk pancakes.   

So, a trip to the store, a carton of buttermilk bought, pancakes made and eaten.  Now, there is only 7/8 of a carton of buttermilk left in your fridge.  The likelihood of making 7 or more batches of buttermilk pancakes before the buttermilk goes bad is, well, not likely.  (But if you do, let me know, I’ll come live at your house!)  

The question remains, what I can do with the rest of this buttermilk without being wasteful?  Make buttermilk bread! (Another side note, if you like to drink buttermilk straight, well then.  You just can't relate with our buttermilk overload predicament, can you?)  The fluffiness factor we were talking about earlier still plays a role in this bread.  So fluffy.  Makes great toast.  And did I mention french toast?  Now you can serve buttermilk french toast! Oh yes.  Full circle, baby.  Actually, I don't really know where the circle started, so it's hard to tell if we actually came full circle...

On to the recipe! 

Recipe adapted from Jane's Sweets and Baking Journal


Buttermilk Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9x5 inch loaves

Ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620-740g all-purpose flour

  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast

  • 2 tsp / 10g salt

  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk

  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey

  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 375°F / 190°C.  Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.

  1. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt.  Mix together.  Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well.  Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.  

  2. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed.   This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand.  If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.

  3. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil.  Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.  

  4. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it.  Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.  

  5. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour.  Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action.  The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension.  If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth.  The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough.  This is called shaping a "Boule."  If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.  

  6. Repeat with other half of dough.  Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.

  7. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans.  Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour.  Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.  

  8. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam.  A spray bottle works well.  Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C.  Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.  

bread, white bread, carbs, buttermilk, toast, french toast bread
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Buttermilk Bread

A soft white bread made extra fluffy with the use of buttermilk. Great for toast and french toast.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 70 M

ingredients:

  • 5-6 cups / 620g-740g all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp / 9g instant yeast
  • 2 tsp / 10g salt
  • 2 cups / 474g buttermilk
  • 1 Tbsp / 20g maple syrup or honey
  • 2 Tbsp / 28g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Buttermilk Bread

  1. Oven 375°F / 190°C. Grease two approx. 9x5in / 24x13cm loaf pans.
  2. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place 5 cups of flour, yeast, and salt. Mix together. Add buttermilk, maple syrup, and oil, mixing well. Switch to the dough hook if using a stand mixer.
  3. Knead in the stand mixer or by hand on a lightly floured surface, until a smooth dough is formed, adding more flour as needed. This should take about 5-7 minutes with a stand mixer, 10 minutes by hand. If using a stand mixer, still knead a few rounds on a lightly floured surface at the end.
  4. Lightly grease a bowl and place your dough in it, flipping once so that all the dough is lightly coated in oil. Cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about one hour.
  5. When bread has risen, punch or press down to degas it. Dump back onto your floured surface and divide the dough into two even pieces, using a scale for accuracy.
  6. Starting with one half, form dough into a ball by flattening in a small square, then folding 3-4 times to create a ball, stretching as you do to create some tension. Move to a part of your work surface that has minimal flour. Place the ball between your two floured hands, loosely cupped. Move the ball between your hands in a circular motion while gently pulling the dough in a downward action. The bottom of the dough should stick to your surface a bit, and as you gently stretch it down in a circular motion you are creating surface tension. If the dough starts to tear lighten up on the pressure; the dough should look taught and smooth. The surface tension will create a nice crust for your dough. This is called shaping a "Boule." If you're as confused as I would be reading this for the first time, this demonstration from King Arthur Flour is very helpful, the technique we're going for is shown starting at about 0:30.
  7. Repeat with other half of dough. Place towel or plastic wrap over the two boules and let rest for 15 minutes.
  8. Shape each round into a loaf and place in prepared pans. Place back in a warm place to double, about 1 hour. Preheat your oven towards the end of this time.
  9. When dough has risen for the second time and the oven is hot, spray the inside walls of your oven with water to create steam. A spray bottle works well. Place loaves in oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until internal temperature reads 200-210°F / 93-99°C. Allow to cool in pans for 10 minutes, then remove and transfer to a wire rack.

Calories

161.19

Fat (grams)

2.00

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.28

Carbs (grams)

30.42

Fiber (grams)

1.12

Net carbs

29.30

Sugar (grams)

2.10

Protein (grams)

4.79

Sodium (milligrams)

239.83

Cholesterol (grams)

0.95
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from 20 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Whole Wheat Bread

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Simple, delicious, whole wheat bread.  No batons, bread machines, or rocket scientists required.  Actually, if you have a bread machine your bread making life is probably a lot simpler than mine.  I enjoy working the bread with my own hands, though.  It's very therapeutic and gives you a nice upper body workout.   Which means you could then eat more bread, yes?

Anyway, this is a simple, versatile bread, good for sandwiches, toast, and...bread.  

Recipe adapted from The Frugal Girl


Whole Wheat Bread

Makes 2 approx. 9in / 23cm loaves

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast

  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt

  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour

  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour

  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)

  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey

  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 177°C.  Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans. 

  1. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.  

  2. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil.  Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.  

  3. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.  

  4. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.  

  5. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it.  Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased.  Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.  

  6. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.  

  7. Separate dough into two equal pieces.  Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle.  It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches.  Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan.  Repeat with second piece.  

  8. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.  

  9. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes.  They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.  

  10. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan.

  • I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ.  Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile.  

  • The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.  I only eat pretty loaves.  ;)

vegan, dairy-free, whole wheat bread, wheat germ, honey, maple syrup, toast, french toast, whole wheat sandwich bread, homemade bread, loaves
Bread
American
Yield: 20
Author:

Whole Wheat Bread

Classic everyday whole wheat bread, great for sandwiches, toast, or anyway you like to eat bread!
prep time: 35 Mcook time: 30 Mtotal time: 65 M

ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp / 14g instant yeast
  • 2 1/2 tsp / 13g salt
  • 3 cups / 384g whole wheat flour
  • 2 3/4 cups / 330g all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/3 cups / 552g warm water (about 110°F / 43°C)
  • 1/4 cup / 80g maple syrup or honey
  • 1/4 cup / 56g oil or melted butter

instructions:

How to cook Whole Wheat Bread

  1. Oven 350°F / 177°C. Grease 2 approx. 9x5in / 23x13cm bread pans.
  2. Combine yeast, salt, 1 cup / 128g whole wheat flour, and 1 cup / 120g all-purpose flour in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed, or mix by hand.
  3. Add warm water, maple syrup, and oil. Mix until ingredients are combined, then increase speed to medium, beating for 3 minutes, or vigorously by hand.
  4. Add remaining whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until a soft but kneadable dough is formed.
  5. Switch to dough hook and knead for 5-7 minutes, turning out on to a lightly floured surface to knead for 1-2 minutes more, until dough looks smooth and elastic. Or, knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for about 10 minutes.
  6. Grease a large bowl and place dough in it. Flip the dough over once so that both sides are lightly greased. Cover bowl with a clean towel and place in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume, about 45-60 minutes.
  7. When dough has risen, punch down and knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes.
  8. Separate dough into two equal pieces. Roll or press one piece out into a small rectangle. It does not have to be exact or very big, the width of it should be a touch smaller than your bread pan, or 9 inches. Starting from the short end, roll the dough up and place in your prepared pan. Repeat with second piece.
  9. Place towel back over loaves and let rise until doubled, about 30-45 minutes.
  10. When loaves have risen, bake for about 30 minutes. They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom or the internal temperature should read about 205°F / 96°C.
  11. Cool in pans 10 minutes before removing and allowing to cool fully.

NOTES:

If you use oil to make this bread, it will be dairy-free. If you use oil and maple syrup, it will also be vegan. I have also made this bread with great success substituting part of the all-purpose flour with wheat germ. Gives it an extra nutty flavor profile. The rolling step creates surface tension in the bread, and therefore a prettier loaf.

Calories

162.77

Fat (grams)

3.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.30

Carbs (grams)

29.38

Fiber (grams)

2.69

Net carbs

26.69

Sugar (grams)

2.54

Protein (grams)

4.53

Sodium (milligrams)

254.58

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 1 slice from a 10-slice loaf.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

DSC_0185.jpg

Happy Thanksgiving!  I am thankful for so many things.  One of those things is cheesecake. 

Especially a caramel cheesecake with a layer of chocolate between the crust and cheesecake, toffee bits, whipped cream, and more caramel drizzled on top. Yep, especially that.

I love the graham cracker crust because it stays together so well! The secret is to use toffee bits in the crust. Toffee is sticky and while the crust is baking all the little pieces melt a bit, fusing the graham cracker crust together into a beautiful, slightly crunchy mass. No crumbling graham cracker crusts today! I mean, I even pressed the crust all the way up the sides of the pan and it stayed even after taking off the spring form pan. Success.

You know how they say actions speak louder than words?  Well, instead of talking about how much I love cheesecake and how great this crust is, I'm going to share the recipe with you...that's an action, right?  Then in turn you can make it, and then you acted on your thankfulness too.  This is such a great plan, let's go! 

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy something using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from Yammie’s Noshery


Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

Serves about 16-20

Ingredients:

For the Toffee Crust

  • 3 cups / 255g crushed graham crackers, about 2 packages or 18 sheets

  • 1/2 cup / 85g toffee bits, plain or with chocolate (Heath Bits O Brickle)

  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar

  • 1 cup / 226g butter, melted

  • 6 oz / 170g bitter-sweet chocolate, chopped

For the Filling

  • 3 8oz packages / 675g cream cheese, room temperature

  • 1 cup / 245g sour cream

  • 1 cup / 200g sugar

  • 1 Tbsp / 15g vanilla extract

  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce (To make homemade caramel, halve this recipe here)

  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten

For the Topping

  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream

  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup or sugar

  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce

  • 1/4 cup / 43g toffee bits

Directions:

Oven 300°F / 149°C.  10in / 26cm spring-form pan lined with parchment paper, bottom and sides.

Make the Toffee Crust

  1. Combine graham crackers, toffee, brown sugar, and butter.  Press firmly into the prepared spring-form pan, pressing all the way up the sides.  Sprinkle chopped chocolate evenly over bottom of crust. 

  2. Bake for 5 minutes or until chocolate is melted.  Remove from oven and spread chocolate evenly with a spatula.  Place crust in freezer while you make the filling.

Make the Filling

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese, sour cream, and sugar on low-medium speed for a few minutes.  Add vanilla and caramel.  Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until just combined. 

  2. Pour over crust and bake for about 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until edges are set and center is still a bit jiggly when lightly shaken. 

  3. Turn off oven and crack open the door, leaving cheesecake to set for another 30 minutes.  Remove from oven and allow to cool for a further 30 minutes.

  4. Refrigerate until completely chilled, about 6 hours or overnight.

Make the Topping

  1. When cheesecake is ready, beat whipping cream in the bowl of a stand mixer until soft peaks form.  Add maple syrup and beat until stiff peaks form. 

  2. Pipe whipped cream onto cheesecake, or if you don't have piping bags or tips, simply spread it with a spatula. 

  3. Warm caramel in a small saucepan and drizzle all over the cheesecake with a spoon or spatula.  Sprinkle with toffee and chill until ready to serve.

Jenny's Notes:

  • Cheesecakes require a decent amount of beating, however, avoid beating on high speeds as you don't want to incorporate too much air into the batter. 

  • You can also use an 8in / 20cm spring-form pan + a 6in / 15cm spring-form pan to make this recipe. Or, instead of the 6 incher just stick any extra crust in the bottom of a square baking dish, top with lefotver filling and you have cheesecake bars! I have done the second option before. :) The bars will bake for less time than a spring-form pan.

caramel, toffee crunch, Heath, Bits O Brickle, cheesecake, homemade caramel, chocolate, graham cracker crust
dessert
American
Yield: 16-20 servings
Author:

Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

Toffee graham gracker crust, a layer of dark chocolate, caramel cheesecake filling, and whipped cream, caramel, and more toffee bits on top.
prep time: 1 hourcook time: 1 H & 55 Mtotal time: 2 H & 55 M

ingredients:

For the Toffee Crust
  • 3 cups / 255g crushed graham crackers, about 2 packages or 18 sheets
  • 1/2 cup / 85g toffee bits, plain or with chocolate
  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar
  • 1 cup / 226g butter, melted
  • 6 oz / 170g bitter-sweet chocolate, chopped
For the Filling
  • 3 8oz packages / 675g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup / 245g sour cream
  • 1 cup / 200g sugar
  • 1 Tbsp / 15g vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce (To make homemade caramel, halve this recipe here)
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
For the Topping
  • 1 cup / 237g heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup or sugar
  • 1/4 cup / 75g caramel sauce
  • 1/4 cup / 43g toffee bits

instructions:

How to cook Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

  1. Oven 300°F / 149°C. 10in / 26cm spring-form pan lined with parchment paper, bottom and sides.
Make the Toffee Crust
  1. Combine graham crackers, toffee, brown sugar, and butter. Press firmly into the prepared spring-form pan, pressing all the way up the sides. Sprinkle chopped chocolate evenly over bottom of crust.
  2. Bake for 5 minutes or until chocolate is melted. Remove from oven and spread chocolate evenly with a spatula. Place crust in freezer while you make the filling.
Make the Filling
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat cream cheese, sour cream, and sugar on low-medium speed for a few minutes. Add vanilla and caramel. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until just combined.
  2. Pour over crust and bake for about 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until edges are set and center is still a bit jiggly when lightly shaken.
  3. Turn off oven and crack open the door, leaving cheesecake to set for another 30 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool for a further 30 minutes.
  4. Refrigerate until completely chilled, about 6 hours or overnight.
Make the Topping
  1. When cheesecake is ready, beat whipping cream in the bowl of a stand mixer until soft peaks form. Add maple syrup and beat until stiff peaks form.
  2. Pipe whipped cream onto cheesecake, or if you don't have piping bags or tips, simply spread it with a spatula.
  3. Warm caramel in a small saucepan and drizzle all over the cheesecake with a spoon or spatula. Sprinkle with toffee and chill until ready to serve.

NOTES:

Cheesecakes require a decent amount of beating, however, avoid beating on high speeds as you don't want to incorporate too much air into the batter. You can also use an 8in / 20cm spring-form pan + a 6in / 15cm spring-form pan to make this recipe. Or, instead of the 6 incher just stick any extra crust in the bottom of a square baking dish, top with lefotver filling and you have cheesecake bars! I have done the second option before. :) The bars will bake for less time than a spring-form pan.

Calories

619.24

Fat (grams)

42.95

Sat. Fat (grams)

25.01

Carbs (grams)

53.18

Fiber (grams)

0.90

Net carbs

52.27

Sugar (grams)

42.62

Protein (grams)

7.17

Sodium (milligrams)

376.36

Cholesterol (grams)

156.01
Nutritional information is approximate and based on 16 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

The great thing about these Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites is that they whip up so quick.  In less than 15 minutes you can have delicious morsels easy to grab for a snack, pack for a quick lunch, or take on long car rides.  They're so easy to make you might spend more time assembling the ingredients, or mis en place, than making them!

These little balls of energy are all about that pumpkin and spice and everything nice, and health and wealth with all of that schmealth.  Or something like that.  These will not make you rich.  Or give you schmealth.  I would never wish schmealth on anyone.  That sounds like some terrible disease.  Nor will these actually bite you.  You bite them.  Nom nom nom.

  Now if I would stop rambling you probably could've had them already made...Scusami.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!


Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

Makes about 12-15 Bites

Ingredients:

    •    1 cup / 90g rolled oats
    •    1/4 cup / 45g ground flax seeds or wheat germ
    •    1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
    •    1/4 tsp cloves
    •    1/4 tsp ginger
    •    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    •    1/4 cup / 65g peanut butter
    •    1/4 cup / 60g pumpkin puree
    •    3 Tbsp / 60g maple syrup or honey
    •    1 tsp vanilla extract
    •    1/4 cup / 45g mini chocolate chips

Directions:

  1. In a medium bowl combine all ingredients; mix well.

  2. Roll mixture into approximately 1 inch balls.  Place in a container and store in the refrigerator, or freeze for snacking at a later date. 

Jenny's Notes:

  • With these types of recipes you do not have to be overly exact in your measurements.  If the dough seems too soft, simply add more oats or flax.  Too crumbly and you can add any number of things, honey, maple syrup, peanut butter...the choice is yours to personalize as you wish!

  • To make these energy bites vegan, be sure to use maple syrup instead of honey. For gluten-free energy bites, make sure your oats are certified gluten-free. For dairy-free, ensure your chocolate chips are dairy-free.

pumpkin spice, energy balls, vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free, fall recipe
snacks
American
Yield: 12-15
Author:
Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

A quick and versatile snack, on the go breakfast, or dessert full of pumpkin and fall spice that is easily made vegan, gluten-free, and dairy-free.
prep time: 15 Mcook time: total time: 15 M

ingredients:

  • 1 cup / 90g rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup / 45g ground flax seeds or wheat germ
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup / 65g peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup / 60g pumpkin puree
  • 3 Tbsp / 60g maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup / 45g mini chocolate chips

instructions:

How to cook Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

  1. In a medium bowl combine all ingredients; mix well.
  2. Roll mixture into approximately 1 inch balls. Place in a container and store in the refrigerator, or freeze for snacking at a later date.

NOTES:

With these types of recipes you do not have to be overly exact in your measurements. If the dough seems too soft, simply add more oats or flax. Too crumbly and you can add any number of things, honey, maple syrup, peanut butter...the choice is yours to personalize as you wish! To make these energy bites vegan, be sure to use maple syrup instead of honey. For gluten-free energy bites, make sure your oats are certified gluten-free. For dairy-free, ensure your chocolate chips are dairy-free.

Calories

119.52

Fat (grams)

6.04

Sat. Fat (grams)

1.44

Carbs (grams)

14.60

Fiber (grams)

2.81

Net carbs

11.78

Sugar (grams)

5.77

Protein (grams)

3.37

Sodium (milligrams)

28.96

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 12 servings.
Did you make this recipe?
Tag @jenevamorris on instagram and hashtag it #jennyblogs
Created using The Recipes Generator

Now that didn't hurt, did it?  Happy snacking!

Pumpkin Sticky-Bun Muffins

In the midst of all the political upheaval, here is a little reprieve from the chaos to focus on the important things in life: pumpkin and autumn.  This is all I am going to write today, you have plenty of other lengthy essays from one political stand point or another to read at your leisure, you don't need another one from me.  You're welcome.  Go and make these Pumpkin Sticky-Bun Muffins in peace.

Montreal, Canada

Montreal, Canada

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase using these links, Jennyblogs may receive a small commission, at no extra cost to you. This helps to support Jennyblogs. For further information see the privacy policy. Grazie!

Recipe adapted from Southern Living


Pumpkin Sticky Buns

Makes 24 + a few extra

Ingredients:

I used walnuts in this batch

I used walnuts in this batch

  • 2 cups / 250g pecans or walnuts, or a mixture

  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter (1 stick), melted

  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar

  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup

  • 2 cups / 256g whole wheat flour

  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour

  • 2 1/2 cups / 500g sugar

  • 1 tsp cinnamon

  • 3/4 tsp cloves

  • 3/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 1/2 tsp ginger

  • 1 tsp baking soda

  • 1 tsp salt

  • 1 15 oz / 425g can pumpkin purée

  • 3/4 cup / 168g oil

  • 4 eggs

Directions:

Oven 350°F / 170°C.  Grease 2 12-cup muffin tins.

  1. Arrange pecans or walnuts evenly on a baking sheet.  Bake for about 10 minutes or until fragrant and slightly darker in color. 

  2. In a small bowl combine butter, brown sugar, and maple syrup.  Evenly distribute among the 24 muffin cups, putting about a tsp of the mixture in each.  Sprinkle evenly with toasted pecans and set aside.

  3. In a large bowl combine flours, sugar, spices, baking soda, and salt.  Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients.

  4. In another medium bowl beat together pumpkin, oil, eggs.  Pour this mixture into the well in the dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened and combined.  Spoon batter over pecans in muffin tins, filling about 2/3 full. 

  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

  6. Immediately run a knife around the edge of the muffins to loosen and invert pan onto a wire rack or counter to remove muffins.  If you wait too long the muffins will stick to your pans.  

Jenny's Notes:

  • This recipe makes extra batter, you may choose to make more pumpkin muffins, or grease a bread pan and make pumpkin bread.  Extras muffins or bread can always be frozen for a later date. 

  • I don't recommend using paper liners for this recipe.  However, to help with the clean up, be sure to immediately remove muffins from pans and soak pans in hot soapy water.

pumpkin sticky buns, cinnamon, pumpkin spice, nutmeg, cloves, pecans, walnuts, caramel, fall recipe, whole wheat pumpkin muffins
breakfast, brunch, snack, dessert
American
Yield: 26-28
Author:

Pumpkin Sticky-Bun Muffins

Whole wheat pumpkin muffins made with a sticky, gooey caramel and nut topping.
prep time: 40 Mcook time: 35 Mtotal time: 75 M

ingredients:

  • 2 cups / 250g pecans or walnuts, or a mixture
  • 1/2 cup / 113g butter (1 stick), melted
  • 1/2 cup / 100g brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp / 40g maple syrup
  • 2 cups / 256g whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups / 180g all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 cups / 500g sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 3/4 tsp cloves
  • 3/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 15 oz / 425g can pumpkin purée
  • 3/4 cup / 168g oil
  • 4 eggs

instructions:

How to cook Pumpkin Sticky-Bun Muffins

  1. Oven 350°F / 170°C. Grease 2 12-cup muffin tins.
  2. Arrange pecans or walnuts evenly on a baking sheet. Bake for about 10 minutes or until fragrant and slightly darker in color.
  3. In a small bowl combine butter, brown sugar, and maple syrup. Evenly distribute among the 24 muffin cups, putting about a tsp of the mixture in each. Sprinkle evenly with toasted pecans and set aside.
  4. In a large bowl combine flours, sugar, spices, baking soda, and salt. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients.
  5. In another medium bowl beat together pumpkin, oil, eggs. Pour this mixture into the well in the dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened and combined. Spoon batter over pecans in muffin tins, filling about 2/3 full.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  7. Immediately run a knife around the edge of the muffins to loosen and invert pan onto a wire rack or counter to remove muffins. If you wait too long the muffins will stick to your pans.

NOTES:

This recipe makes extra batter, you may choose to make more pumpkin muffins, or grease a bread pan and make pumpkin bread. Extras muffins or bread can always be frozen for a later date. I don't recommend using paper liners for this recipe. However, to help with the clean up, be sure to immediately remove muffins from pans and soak pans in hot soapy water.

Calories

323.77

Fat (grams)

18.03

Sat. Fat (grams)

3.58

Carbs (grams)

39.27

Fiber (grams)

2.73

Net carbs

36.55

Sugar (grams)

24.87

Protein (grams)

4.10

Sodium (milligrams)

179.52

Cholesterol (grams)

37.96
Nutritional information is approximate. Based on 26 servings.
Created using The Recipes Generator

No-Bake Pumpkin Date Bars

Happy Wednesday/Buon Mercoledì!! Still didn't quite make the "Baking Tuesday" but today I shall dub "Baking Wednesday."  And it shall be good.  And involve all things healthy disguised as dessert (did I just lose you? Don't go away just yet, I don't put gross food on my blog!), chocolate (there, now you'll stay), pumpkin, spice, and everything nice! Life is too short to eat and drink poorly.

"La vita è troppo breve per mangiare e bere male" - Eataly

These bars feature a creamy, pumpkin chocolate chip filling atop a wonderfully soft and chewy-sweet date crust .  They can easily be made gluten-free, vegan, and dairy-free.  And you can eat them anytime for breakfast or a healthy snack (to be pronounced snaaaaaack with the Italian hand going) because there is no refined sugar (except from the chocolate chips), protein from the beans, fiber from the oat flour and dates, antioxidants from the maple syrup and spices, and lots of vitamins and minerals from the pumpkin and above mentioned ingredients!  You guys, this is such a win-win.  In fact, these bars might help you not die.  That last claim is not backed by science. 

No-Bake Pumpkin Date Bars

Ingredients:

For the Date Crust

  • 1 cup packed dates
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • pinch of salt

For the Pumpkin Chocolate-Chip Filling

  • 1 15 oz can white beans (navy beans, great northern, etc.)
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup oat flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup packed dates
  • 5 Tbsp maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2/3 cup semi-sweet mini chocolate chips, plus extra for topping

Directions:

Make the Date Crust

In a food processor combine dates, almonds, and salt.  Pulse until the almonds are finely ground and everything comes together into a soft, crumbly dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers.  If after a few minutes the crust doesn't come together, add a few more dates.

Spread and press crust into a 8x8 or 9x9 in square pan.  Clean food processor, you are about to use it again.

Make the Pumpkin Chocolate-Chip Filling

In the food processor, combine all the filling ingredients except for chocolate chips.  Blend until smooth.  Scrape filling into a bowl and stir in chocolate chips.  Spread over crust and top with more chocolate chips. 

Cover and refrigerate for two hours before slicing and serving.  Of course, that's in an ideal world, if you just can't wait, it will be okay.  The center will just be softer.  (And I know this because...)

Jenny's Notes:

Vegan Version: Simply make sure your chocolate chips are vegan. 

Gluten-free: Use certified gluten-free oats.

Dairy-free: Make sure your chocolate chips are dairy-free.  Easy, no?

Don't have oat flour? Make your own! Put the amount of oat flour you need of oats in a food processor or blender, plus a little extra, and blend until finely ground into flour! Tada.

Regarding all spices ever, they should be ground for recipes.  I will indicate only if they should be whole.  For the most part I try to reduce redundancy, since most spices come pre-ground.  For optimal flavor I would recommend buying spices whole and grinding them as needed. A labor of love, but the flavor is so fresh.

If you like sweeter desserts, or are serving a crowd that isn't used to "healthy" desserts, you could always add an extra 1/2 cup or so of brown sugar to the filling.

Maple syrup made by my dad, home-ground oat flour, dry beans, homemade vanilla extract

Maple syrup made by my dad, home-ground oat flour, dry beans, homemade vanilla extract

Adapted from Imma Eat That

White Russian Tart

Mmmmm I love me a White Russian.  Or a Black Russian.  Or you can just give me the Kahlua.  But you know what I love more?  This tart.  Not to mention it is raw, gluten-free, refined-sugar free, and somehow delicious.  Nah I'm just kidding, there a lot of really delicious healthier desserts and foods out there, but the ones that aren't so much tend to get the attention and give the above labels a bad rap. 

When I'm experimenting and trying new recipes in the "healthy" department (as defined by trying to limit refined-sugars or flours, using a vegetable or bean or something that doesn't normally go in that there fudge brownie) I look for the 3 different categories of reactions from my tasters.  I tend to like some very strange things so I can't always judge by whether I like it or not...  Unsweetened cocoa powder by the spoonful, anyone??

  1. The category of "This is honest deliciousness."  When people ask for a recipe or have no idea that there are chickpeas or spinach powder hidden in what they're eating.  Something a normal or even picky eater would eat. 
  2. The category of "It's good for a healthy dessert!"  So it's palatable and they're not gagging, but most would still take a slice of cheesecake over it.  
  3. The category of "I would rather just eat a salad."  If I'm tempted to remedy the taste by adding cups and cups of maple syrup, then when that isn't strong enough, real sugar, it's probably beyond saving.  I know it's bad if I don't even like it.  No worries, those recipes won't come anywhere near this blog. 

This tart is a solid category 1.  Even my mom and brother approved this, and they keep me pretty honest when it comes to healthy desserts. 

I bounce back and forth between decadent desserts and healthier desserts.  I have a love and respect for both, and each have their place and time.  Some days it's honey, nuts, and coconut oil, and other days it's sugar, heavy whipping cream, and butter.  Variety is the spice of life.  Today, it's dates, avocado, and mascarpone.

White Russian Tart

Serves 8-12

Ingredients:

Crust

  • 1 1/2 cups almonds
  • 2 Tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 8-10 dates
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Chocolate Vodka Cream

  • 1/4 cup coconut oil (virgin, unrefined)
  • 1 Tbsp finely ground coffee beans
  • 1 large ripe avocado, peeled and sliced
  • 3 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp vodka
  • 1 tsp rum or Kahlua (of course the Kahlua option adds sugar)
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup

Mascarpone Cream

  • 8 oz mascarpone cheese
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

Make the Crust

In a food processor, combine almonds and coconut and pulse until small crumbles.  Add dates, vanilla, cocoa powder, and salt.  Process until well combined. 

Press into the bottom of a 8 or 9 inch spring-form pan or pie plate.

Make the Chocolate Vodka Cream

Heat coconut oil in small pan over low heat until liquefied.  Combine the melted coconut oil, coffee, avocado, cocoa powder, vodka, rum or Kahlua, and maple syrup in a food processor until smooth.  Stop and scrape down sides and bottom occasionally.  Spread over crust and place in freezer for about 30 minutes.

Make the Mascarpone Cream

Shortly before taking tart out of the freezer, combine mascarpone, maple syrup, and vanilla in a small bowl.  Take the tart out of the freezer and spread mascarpone mixture over it.  Place in fridge for about 2 hours before serving.   

Jenny's Notes:

This tart is not very sweet and really lets the mascarpone shine through.  However, if you or your guests prefer things a little on the sweeter side, feel free to add more maple syrup in either of the creams. 

Also, I like to use black cocoa powder in this recipe.  Sounds ghastly, but it's the stuff of Oreos.  (I didn't know the flavor of Oreo was supposed to be chocolate until I was an adult, but they get their unique flavor from black cocoa.)  If you can get your hands on it, it's really great.  I usually order it from Amazon. 

Adapted from The Clean Dish